Twitter gears up for new push into China with hiring of regional director

China map.shutterstock_119761585

With user growth remaining elusive, it appears Twitter is getting ready to make a run at the world’s largest population of Internet of users.

Twitter chief executive Jack Dorsey tweeted that the company has hired Kathy Chen to be its Greater China managing director.

Its chances of making much headway in China would appear to be slim. The service remains blocked in the country. And even if that changed, it would face huge social networking incumbents like Tencent QQ, Q Zone, Sina Weibo and WeChat.

That said, the Chinese are heavy users of social media and social networking. And according to Chen’s Twitter bio (which she has tweeted seven times!), she is based in Hong Kong. So while she and Dorsey will likely keep trying to woo Chinese government officials, she will also probably try to get Chinese companies who want to reach a global audience to consider ads on Twitter.

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Twitter gears up for new push into China with hiring of regional director

China map.shutterstock_119761585

With user growth remaining elusive, it appears Twitter is getting ready to make a run at the world’s largest population of Internet users.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted that the company has hired Kathy Chen as managing director for Greater China.

Twitter’s chances of making much headway in China would appear to be slim. The service remains blocked in the country. And even if that changed, it would face huge social networking incumbents like Tencent QQ, Q Zone, Sina Weibo, and WeChat.

That said, the Chinese are heavy users of social media and social networking. And according to Chen’s Twitter bio (which she has tweeted seven times!), she is based in Hong Kong. So while she and Dorsey will likely keep trying to woo Chinese government officials, she will also probably try to get Chinese companies who want to reach a global audience to consider running ads on Twitter.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Twitter gears up for new push into China with hiring of regional director

China map.shutterstock_119761585

With user growth remaining elusive, it appears Twitter is getting ready to make a run at the world’s largest population of Internet users.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted that the company has hired Kathy Chen as managing director for Greater China.

Twitter’s chances of making much headway in China would appear to be slim. The service remains blocked in the country. And even if that changed, it would face huge social networking incumbents like Tencent QQ, Q Zone, Sina Weibo, and WeChat.

That said, the Chinese are heavy users of social media and social networking. And according to Chen’s Twitter bio (which she has tweeted seven times!), she is based in Hong Kong. So while she and Dorsey will likely keep trying to woo Chinese government officials, she will also probably try to get Chinese companies who want to reach a global audience to consider running ads on Twitter.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Twitter gears up for new push into China with hiring of regional director

China map.shutterstock_119761585

With user growth remaining elusive, it appears Twitter is getting ready to make a run at the world’s largest population of Internet users.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted that the company has hired Kathy Chen as managing director for Greater China.

Twitter’s chances of making much headway in China would appear to be slim. The service remains blocked in the country. And even if that changed, it would face huge social networking incumbents like Tencent QQ, Q Zone, Sina Weibo, and WeChat.

That said, the Chinese are heavy users of social media and social networking. And according to Chen’s Twitter bio (which she has tweeted seven times!), she is based in Hong Kong. So while she and Dorsey will likely keep trying to woo Chinese government officials, she will also probably try to get Chinese companies who want to reach a global audience to consider running ads on Twitter.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Twitter gears up for new push into China with hiring of regional director

China map.shutterstock_119761585

With user growth remaining elusive, it appears Twitter is getting ready to make a run at the world’s largest population of Internet users.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted that the company has hired Kathy Chen as managing director for Greater China.

Twitter’s chances of making much headway in China would appear to be slim. The service remains blocked in the country. And even if that changed, it would face huge social networking incumbents like Tencent QQ, Q Zone, Sina Weibo, and WeChat.

That said, the Chinese are heavy users of social media and social networking. And according to Chen’s Twitter bio (which she has tweeted seven times!), she is based in Hong Kong. So while she and Dorsey will likely keep trying to woo Chinese government officials, she will also probably try to get Chinese companies who want to reach a global audience to consider running ads on Twitter.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Twitter gears up for new push into China with hiring of regional director

China map.shutterstock_119761585

With user growth remaining elusive, it appears Twitter is getting ready to make a run at the world’s largest population of Internet users.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted that the company has hired Kathy Chen as managing director for Greater China.

Twitter’s chances of making much headway in China would appear to be slim. The service remains blocked in the country. And even if that changed, it would face huge social networking incumbents like Tencent QQ, Q Zone, Sina Weibo, and WeChat.

That said, the Chinese are heavy users of social media and social networking. And according to Chen’s Twitter bio (which she has tweeted seven times!), she is based in Hong Kong. So while she and Dorsey will likely keep trying to woo Chinese government officials, she will also probably try to get Chinese companies who want to reach a global audience to consider running ads on Twitter.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Here are the 16 world leaders and organizations who are embracing Snapchat

how-world-leaders-use-snapchat-

Snapchat may be one of the hottest social networks, but unlike rivals Twitter and Facebook, it can be a bit tougher to measure the success of any individual or organization.

Still, Burson-Marsteller, a global public relations and communications firm, decided to take a stab. The firm regularly issues reports on how world leaders and governments are using Twitter and Facebook. Now, it has decided to take a look at Snapchat.

“Snapchat is the fastest growing social media platform and, according to the latest statistics, almost two thirds of its users are aged between 13 and 24 years old, making it the ultimate platform to reach young audiences,” says the Burson-Marsteller report. “It therefore comes as no surprise that government leaders are starting to set up accounts on the platform to reach out to future leaders.”

What makes tracking Snapchat tricky is that unlike other social networks, it doesn’t post the number of followers an account has in public, or the views a snap gets. And those snaps disappear after 24 hours.

Not surprisingly, in this initial review, the numbers of users are quite small: 16 heads of state and international organizations. Those ranks include four presidents, three governments, two foreign ministries, and a foreign minister:

These include:

“Despite its limitations some governments have discovered Snapchat to be a formidable broadcasting tool to target a decidedly younger audience, either by chronicling the public activities of their leaders or to raise the level of public engagement at selected events,” says the report. “International organizations, particularly UNICEF and the European Parliament, use Snapchat to engage with their followers, often reposting their snaps. And the numbers are impressive: the UK Foreign Office reports an engagement rate of more than 60% (Snap views in comparison to followers) and a 90% completion rate (last snap views minus first snap views) of its stories.”

According to the report, the UKForeignOffice was the first of this group to create a Snapchat account, which it opened last September in conjunction with the Rugby World Cup.

The U.S. State Department followed suit in December for the COP21 environmental summit in Paris. The WhiteHouse jumped on the bandwagon in January.

The report highlights UNICEF and the European Parliament as probably doing the best job on Snapchat. The European Parliament shares its agenda and engages with followers. UNICEF has used the platform to tell powerful stories about relief work being done in places like Yemen’s capital.

Finally, the reports offers some critical advice to governments considering embracing Snapchat. Most notably: “Don’t vomit rainbows, that’s what mean kids do.”

 

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Antitrust pressure on Google’s Android builds as Russia’s fine looms

Android Marshmallow

Sometime today Alphabet’s Google may learn just how large of a fine it is facing for alleged Android antitrust abuses in Russia.

But the antitrust ruling it lost last month in Russia is just one of a series of setbacks for the world’s largest mobile operating system, which finds itself under a growing amount of regulatory scrutiny around the world.

In March, a Russian appeals court denied Google’s appeal and let stand a ruling that Android had broken the nation’s antitrust rules by requiring pre-installation of some of Google’s apps.

The original complaint had been brought by Russian Internet giant Yandex. Russian officials had said that the fine could be as high as eight percent of the revenue Google derives from people using its services on Android in Russia. However, it’s still unclear what that revenue number is.

The European Union announced last year that it was investigating similar issues with regard to Android. Last week, EU Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said its inquiry was pressing ahead and hinted that her agency could be filing formal charges soon, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Meanwhile, back on the home front, Android continues to face the possibility that the Federal Trade Commission will open a formal investigation into the OS. Last September, Bloomberg reported that the agency has begun the initial stages of a probe, though no formal inquiry or charges have been announced yet.

All these investigations revolve around the same basic question: Is Google being too aggressive in requiring handset makers that use Android to bundle its apps on their phones? Many rivals have complained about the practice.

Google might walk a fine line here, but the practice also seems an essential underpinning of the strategy behind offering a free mobile phone operating service in the first place. Losing such a case over the long-term could be about more than just whatever fines Google may or may not have to pay.

If Google was at some point forced to strip all of its own apps and services from Android, one could wonder to what degree the company would want to continue to focus on its development.

Anything that caused Google to back away from Android, even a bit, could have giant consequences for a huge ecosystem of handset makers, app developers, and new consumers who are able to buy their first smartphones thanks the increasingly low cost of handsets.

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HTC 10 promotional video leaks ahead of launch event

HTC at Mobile World Congress 2015 Barcelona

There has already been some photographic leakage of HTC’s next attempt at flagship phone. Now there is video leakage.

Just one day before the company is set to unveil the HTC 10 in ceremonies across the global, a promotional video has surfaced.

VentureBeat’s Evan Blass had recently reported on many of the HTC 10 details:

A 5.2-inch, Android Marshmallow 6.0-powered handset, the 10 is HTC’s attempt to reverse a several-year decline in profitability, including a particularly disappointing flagship performance in 2015’s HTC One M9. That device was widely panned for its imaging performance, a flaw that the company is hoping to correct with 10’s 12-megapixel UltraPixel 2 sensor, alongside laser auto focus and an optically stabilized f/1.8 lens.

Now, take a look and see what you think:

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The shocking fall of Marvell’s Weili Dai, long hailed as a role model for women in Silicon Valley

Weili Dai, co-founder of Marvell

A few years ago, I made the trek out to the headquarters of Marvell Technology Group in Santa Clara to meet co-founder and president Weili Dai. As an immigrant, an engineer, an entrepreneur and, yes, a woman, hers was a remarkable tale of success.

And it was a tale oft told. I wrote a profile for the Los Angeles Times following our interview. But I was hardly the first or the last to profile the astonishing woman who had been lauded so many times as a pioneer and an inspiration and a role model.

I’ll admit that I didn’t take too much notice when I heard some of the rumblings about accounting issues and investigations at Marvell a few months ago. So it was a shock to see that Dai and her husband, Marvell co-founder and chief executive Sehat Sutardja, had been fired this week.

In a press release, the company said Sutardja and Dai will remain on the board of directors, with Sutardja continuing as chair. Marvell has created an executive committee to run the company while the board searches for new leadership. Marvell’s accounting firm resigned a few months ago and has since been replaced in the midst of the inquiry.

The couple’s dismissal comes after a months-long probe found no accounting fraud. But as Reuters noted, the investigation found: “There was ‘significant pressure’ from the management on sales teams to meet revenue targets. The audit committee also noted that internal controls were not fully followed and revenue was booked prematurely for some transactions.”

Certainly the demise of Sutardja is its own tragic story. But for many years, Dai served as the public face of Marvell, a tough executive who balanced that role with being the company’s goodwill ambassador. She was funny, fashionable, scary smart, and personable.

Dai, a software engineer, and Sutardja, a chip designer, co-founded Marvell in 1995. The company is a “fabless” semiconductor company, meaning it designs the chips and someone else builds them.

She was a native of Shanghai who moved to the U.S. as a girl with her family. Dai had been interested in technology at an early age and eventually graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in computer science. Having done an internship as an undergraduate at Bell Labs in New Jersey, she started working after graduation in 1984 at Xerox’s PARC lab in Palo Alto.

As the company grew, Dai received much of the public acclaim. As her bio on the company’s website notes: “Weili Dai is one of the most successful women entrepreneurs in the world today…the only woman co-founder of a global semiconductor company.”

Over time, the awards and plaudits piled high, as her bio also points out:

For her contributions to technology and society, Newsweek named Ms. Dai one of the “150 Women Who Shake the World” and was recently profiled by CNN International for the Leading Women Series: Leading the Female Tech Charge, Leading Women Principles Fair and Care,Educating for Future Success, and Leading Women Inspire Others. Additionally, Forbes Magazine lists Ms. Dai as one of the “World’s 100 Most Powerful Women”.

The Global Semiconductor Alliance (GSA) recently recognized Ms. Dai along with her husband Sehat Sutardja, CEO of Marvell, with the prestigious 2013 Dr. Morris Chang Exemplary Leadership Award.

When I met her in 2013, she had just recently participated in a roundtable of tech leaders who had met with President Obama. Our meeting also followed her recognition by the state of California for her work advocating the need for more female engineers. She was one of 11 women honored by the California Assembly with its “Breaking the Glass Ceiling” award for “female pioneers in science, civil rights and government.

“It was such an honor to be part of this group of 11 amazing women,” Dai told me that day. “I guess they picked me because they were looking for a geek. Just joking.”

She made it clear that in charting her success, she felt no need to bend to convention, or change her identity to fit neatly into a male-dominated industry. That day we toured the company’s headquarters, which she had a strong hand in designing. She was proud to be passionate about sports, wearing her geekiness on her sleeve, and above all being a woman in this field — something she felt was not just a liability to overcome, but a distinct advantage.

“It’s not just about developing ‘nerdy’ technology,” Dai said that day. “It’s about relating it to the social aspects of our lives. And guess what? A woman’s natural talent is design, and the look and feel, and making these things fit into our lifestyles.”

It will take some time for the dust to settle from the events this week. Perhaps when the full story emerges, and with the passing of time, she will be able to reclaim some sense of her reputation and legacy.

But for now, her tale has morphed from inspirational to cautionary. And Silicon Valley has once again been reminded that placing people on a pedestal too high can make their fall even more painful to watch.

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