Apple App Store and Google Play downloads grew 8.2% in Q1 thanks to games

Clash Royale is dominant.

Mobile is still growing, and gaming — as with nearly every emerging consumer technology — should get most of the credit.

People downloaded 17.2 billion apps from the iOS and Android app markets in the first quarter of 2016, according to a new report from intelligence firm Sensor Tower. That’s up 8.2 percent over the same period in 2015. As usual, the gaming category made up the most significant chunk of that total with 1.95 billion game installs from the Apple App Store and 4.7 billion from Android’s Google Play. Gaming is 284 percent and 404 percent larger than the next closest categories on iOS and Android, respectively. This data reveals why it isn’t surprising that the global gaming industry is worth $34.8 billion annually and growing.

While iOS trails Android in terms of volume of downloads, its gaming category is growing much faster. The App Store saw a 14 percent year-over-year increase for its gaming category while the same sector on Google Play jumped less than a percent. That makes some sense considering games on Google’s mobile operating system are so far ahead of everything else.

iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it's growing at a rate that's outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Above: iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it’s growing at a rate that’s outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Image Credit: Sensor Tower

Of course, it’s the same handful of companies taking advantage of the massive mobile audience. Madden NFL Mobile publisher Electronic Arts, Candy Crush company King, and Kim Kardashian developer Glu Mobile do well on iOS, Android, or both in terms of downloads. And that makes for a familiar download list — although publisher Supercell’s new strategy battler Clash Royale debuted high on the charts despite having only one month on the market. This is one of the big reasons it made $110 million last month.

The top downloaded games worldwide in the first quarter of 2016, according to Sensor Tower:

  1. Piano Tiles 2
  2. Candy Crush Jelly Saga
  3. Color Switch
  4. Clash Royale
  5. Subway Surfers
  6. Traffic Rider
  7. Clash of Clans
  8. My Talking Tom
  9. Candy Crush Saga
  10. Temple Run 2

This continued growth is a positive sign for developers and publishers who have turned gaming on smart devices into a lucrative business. Clash Royale is on pace to generate $1 billion this year, but it isn’t alone. You can expect Supercell’s Clash of Clans to likely do the same. The suite of Candy Crush releases from King should likely surpass that massive milestone as well.

For gaming as a whole, a strong mobile sector proves that consumers still want to spend their money on interactive entertainment. This should convince companies like Sony, Microsoft, Facebook, and more to keep investing in the space whether that’s with traditional consoles, cutting-edge virtual reality systems, or mobile apps.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Apple App Store and Google Play downloads grew 8.2% in Q1 thanks to games

Clash Royale is dominant.

Mobile is still growing, and gaming — as with nearly every emerging consumer technology — should get most of the credit.

People downloaded 17.2 billion apps from the iOS and Android app markets in the first quarter of 2016, according to a new report from intelligence firm Sensor Tower. That’s up 8.2 percent over the same period in 2015. As usual, the gaming category made up the most significant chunk of that total with 1.95 billion game installs from the Apple App Store and 4.7 billion from Android’s Google Play. Gaming is 284 percent and 404 percent larger than the next closest categories on iOS and Android, respectively. This data reveals why it isn’t surprising that the global gaming industry is worth $34.8 billion annually and growing.

While iOS trails Android in terms of volume of downloads, its gaming category is growing much faster. The App Store saw a 14 percent year-over-year increase for its gaming category while the same sector on Google Play jumped less than a percent. That makes some sense considering games on Google’s mobile operating system are so far ahead of everything else.

iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it's growing at a rate that's outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Above: iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it’s growing at a rate that’s outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Image Credit: Sensor Tower

Of course, it’s the same handful of companies taking advantage of the massive mobile audience. Madden NFL Mobile publisher Electronic Arts, Candy Crush company King, and Kim Kardashian developer Glu Mobile do well on iOS, Android, or both in terms of downloads. And that makes for a familiar download list — although publisher Supercell’s new strategy battler Clash Royale debuted high on the charts despite having only one month on the market. This is one of the big reasons it made $110 million last month.

The top downloaded games worldwide in the first quarter of 2016, according to Sensor Tower:

  1. Piano Tiles 2
  2. Candy Crush Jelly Saga
  3. Color Switch
  4. Clash Royale
  5. Subway Surfers
  6. Traffic Rider
  7. Clash of Clans
  8. My Talking Tom
  9. Candy Crush Saga
  10. Temple Run 2

This continued growth is a positive sign for developers and publishers who have turned gaming on smart devices into a lucrative business. Clash Royale is on pace to generate $1 billion this year, but it isn’t alone. You can expect Supercell’s Clash of Clans to likely do the same. The suite of Candy Crush releases from King should likely surpass that massive milestone as well.

For gaming as a whole, a strong mobile sector proves that consumers still want to spend their money on interactive entertainment. This should convince companies like Sony, Microsoft, Facebook, and more to keep investing in the space whether that’s with traditional consoles, cutting-edge virtual reality systems, or mobile apps.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Apple App Store and Google Play downloads grew 8.2% in Q1 thanks to games

Clash Royale is dominant.

Mobile is still growing, and gaming — as with nearly every emerging consumer technology — should get most of the credit.

People downloaded 17.2 billion apps from the iOS and Android app markets in the first quarter of 2016, according to a new report from intelligence firm Sensor Tower. That’s up 8.2 percent over the same period in 2015. As usual, the gaming category made up the most significant chunk of that total with 1.95 billion game installs from the Apple App Store and 4.7 billion from Android’s Google Play. Gaming is 284 percent and 404 percent larger than the next closest categories on iOS and Android, respectively. This data reveals why it isn’t surprising that the global gaming industry is worth $34.8 billion annually and growing.

While iOS trails Android in terms of volume of downloads, its gaming category is growing much faster. The App Store saw a 14 percent year-over-year increase for its gaming category while the same sector on Google Play jumped less than a percent. That makes some sense considering games on Google’s mobile operating system are so far ahead of everything else.

iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it's growing at a rate that's outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Above: iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it’s growing at a rate that’s outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Image Credit: Sensor Tower

Of course, it’s the same handful of companies taking advantage of the massive mobile audience. Madden NFL Mobile publisher Electronic Arts, Candy Crush company King, and Kim Kardashian developer Glu Mobile do well on iOS, Android, or both in terms of downloads. And that makes for a familiar download list — although publisher Supercell’s new strategy battler Clash Royale debuted high on the charts despite having only one month on the market. This is one of the big reasons it made $110 million last month.

The top downloaded games worldwide in the first quarter of 2016, according to Sensor Tower:

  1. Piano Tiles 2
  2. Candy Crush Jelly Saga
  3. Color Switch
  4. Clash Royale
  5. Subway Surfers
  6. Traffic Rider
  7. Clash of Clans
  8. My Talking Tom
  9. Candy Crush Saga
  10. Temple Run 2

This continued growth is a positive sign for developers and publishers who have turned gaming on smart devices into a lucrative business. Clash Royale is on pace to generate $1 billion this year, but it isn’t alone. You can expect Supercell’s Clash of Clans to likely do the same. The suite of Candy Crush releases from King should likely surpass that massive milestone as well.

For gaming as a whole, a strong mobile sector proves that consumers still want to spend their money on interactive entertainment. This should convince companies like Sony, Microsoft, Facebook, and more to keep investing in the space whether that’s with traditional consoles, cutting-edge virtual reality systems, or mobile apps.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Apple App Store and Google Play downloads grew 8.2% in Q1 thanks to games

Clash Royale is dominant.

Mobile is still growing, and gaming — as with nearly every emerging consumer technology — should get most of the credit.

People downloaded 17.2 billion apps from the iOS and Android app markets in the first quarter of 2016, according to a new report from intelligence firm Sensor Tower. That’s up 8.2 percent over the same period in 2015. As usual, the gaming category made up the most significant chunk of that total with 1.95 billion game installs from the Apple App Store and 4.7 billion from Android’s Google Play. Gaming is 284 percent and 404 percent larger than the next closest categories on iOS and Android, respectively. This data reveals why it isn’t surprising that the global gaming industry is worth $34.8 billion annually and growing.

While iOS trails Android in terms of volume of downloads, its gaming category is growing much faster. The App Store saw a 14 percent year-over-year increase for its gaming category while the same sector on Google Play jumped less than a percent. That makes some sense considering games on Google’s mobile operating system are so far ahead of everything else.

iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it's growing at a rate that's outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Above: iOS gaming is bringing in more downloads than ever, and it’s growing at a rate that’s outpacing the rest of the App Store.

Image Credit: Sensor Tower

Of course, it’s the same handful of companies taking advantage of the massive mobile audience. Madden NFL Mobile publisher Electronic Arts, Candy Crush company King, and Kim Kardashian developer Glu Mobile do well on iOS, Android, or both in terms of downloads. And that makes for a familiar download list — although publisher Supercell’s new strategy battler Clash Royale debuted high on the charts despite having only one month on the market. This is one of the big reasons it made $110 million last month.

The top downloaded games worldwide in the first quarter of 2016, according to Sensor Tower:

  1. Piano Tiles 2
  2. Candy Crush Jelly Saga
  3. Color Switch
  4. Clash Royale
  5. Subway Surfers
  6. Traffic Rider
  7. Clash of Clans
  8. My Talking Tom
  9. Candy Crush Saga
  10. Temple Run 2

This continued growth is a positive sign for developers and publishers who have turned gaming on smart devices into a lucrative business. Clash Royale is on pace to generate $1 billion this year, but it isn’t alone. You can expect Supercell’s Clash of Clans to likely do the same. The suite of Candy Crush releases from King should likely surpass that massive milestone as well.

For gaming as a whole, a strong mobile sector proves that consumers still want to spend their money on interactive entertainment. This should convince companies like Sony, Microsoft, Facebook, and more to keep investing in the space whether that’s with traditional consoles, cutting-edge virtual reality systems, or mobile apps.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Supercell’s Clash Royale on pace for $1B year after $110M debut last month

Clash Royale is doing OK.

Supercell knows how to make money.

The mobile publisher earned $80 million from it’s newly released head-to-head strategy battler Clash Royale last month, according to industry-tracking firm NewZoo. That figure does not include the 30 percent that Supercell gave to Apple and Google, which would put the game’s total monthly revenues closer to $110 million. Clash Royale is an online multiplayer game where two people send out units from their deck to attack each other’s defensive towers. It is fast-paced with a strong layer of tactics, and it is already on pace to bring in more than $1 billion annually — although that isn’t guaranteed. That’s something that only a handful of mobile apps have ever done. Gaming on smartphones and tablets already generates $34.8 billion in spending every year, but Clash Royale could bump that number up a few notches.

Supercell isn’t new to this level of success. The company has previously made more than $1 billion annually from its Clash of Clans, which has finished beyond or near that mark since 2013. What’s extra impressive in this case, however, is that Clash Royale’s revenues are not coming at a significant detriment to Clash of Clans.

“[Supercell’s] flagship title saw only a slight single-digit decline in March,” reads a Newzoo report.

The better news for Supercell is that the $110 million doesn’t include Android revenues from China. Clash Royale only just made its debut in that key market this month after Kunlun, Supercell’s Chinese publishing partner, released it on a variety of mobile stores in that country (Google Play does not work in China).

At this point, more than half of the game’s iOS revenue is coming from just the U.S. and China. When you look at the spending by major territory, North America and Asia Pacific represent 64 percent of all iOS Clash Royale spending, so you can see the importance of getting the game out on Android in a country where Google’s operating system has a much larger install base.

Newzoo points out that Clash Royale has rocketed to such quick success because of its strong core gameplay elements combined with some serious pressure to spend real money to keep up with your friends. The game is arguably one of the best games to ever top the grossing chart on iOS or Android, and it stinks to lose a match because your opponent has a card you do not or has upgraded a character to a higher level. I know that convinced me to fork over $10.

But Clash Royale is also a treadmill. I didn’t feel any different about the game after spending that money. I immediately thought that I needed to spend more money to keep moving forward, and some people obviously end up doing that over and over.

These money-making techniques have pushed Clash Royale to the top of the grossing charts in the most important mobile markets including the United States, Canada, Germany, and Brazil.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Blizzard is fending off a potential Lizard Squad cyberattack that’s affecting Battle.net

Overwatch is Blizzard's upcoming third-person shooter.

You may have trouble getting your Hearthstone on.

Blizzard acknowledges it is dealing with a distributed denial-of-service attack that is preventing some people from getting online with the publisher’s Battle.net services.

The infamous cyberattack group Lizard Squad started talking about blitzing Battle.net and Blizzard earlier today.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Microsoft on causing Oculus Rift delays: ‘This is false’

The Oculus Rift VR headset comes with all of these items.

If you preordered the Oculus Rift headset, you might still be waiting for it — but that’s not because of the Xbox One controller.

Microsoft has debunked allegations that it is responsible for the delays customers are experiencing with their Oculus Rift headset orders. Yesterday, a post on Reddit from someone claiming to have “insider” status at Oculus VR (the company responsible for the impressive head-mounted display) went into great detail about how Rift shipments weren’t going out on time because Microsoft failed to deliver enough Xbox One controllers. This claim picked up some traction among VR-news sites, and this prompted GamesBeat to reach out to Microsoft — who debunked this claim.

“This is false,” a Microsoft spokesperson told GamesBeat. “And questions about Rift should be directed to Oculus VR.”

Oculus confirmed in a statement last week that it is facing a “component shortage,” and the Reddit post provided a compelling narrative that enabled some people to put all of the blame on Microsoft. But no matter what the source of the problem is, the delays could turn into a problem down the line for an industry that analysts like tech adviser Digi-Capital and SuperData Research predict could generate between $30 billion and $40 billion in revenue by 2020.

Reddit has since tagged the post as “confirmed fake” because an Oculus customer-support specialist, who has confirmed their identity with the moderators of the forum, laughed off the claim.

“Totally fake, but super-entertaining,” reads TheTwistgibber’s post. “Thanks for this! Keep the fanfic coming!”

The original claim doesn’t make a lot of sense. The Xbox One controller is one of the few components inside the Oculus Rift package that doesn’t require a new manufacturing pipeline. Microsoft started producing the device in 2013. Even if you consider that this is the revised edition of the gamepad with the built-in microphone jack, Microsoft started making those in early 2015. That’s opposed to the custom Fresnel lenses, an array of ARM-chip-powered sensors, and a new display for the headset. To mass produce those items, Oculus needed to spin up a whole new supply chain, and that is notoriously difficult.

And it doesn’t take a ton of demand to experience delays. The now-forgotten Ouya Android-powered microconsole went through something similar, and it had absolutely no dealings with Microsoft.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Virtual reality justifies those ludicrous 17-inch ‘portable desktops’

This MSI laptop with a desktop Nvidia GTX 980 enables me to quickly set up my living room for VR without having to lug a huge tower downstairs.

Gaming laptops are a consumer-electronics category that don’t make a whole lot of sense anymore. They’re expensive, bulky, and hot as hell. That’s why companies like Razer are rethinking these products. But the age of virtual reality is starting to reveal some new reasons to own a massive laptop with insane graphics capabilities.

Soon after getting the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift virtual reality headsets, computer manufacturer MSI sent GamesBeat its GT72S Dominator Pro laptop, and while a portable desktop like this may seem excessive in a world where I have powerful desktop and a light ultrabook, it turns out this is an ideal machine for virtual reality. This version of the Dominator features the Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 graphics card — notice that does not have the “M” suffix. That means this is the full desktop GPU (graphics processing unit), which puts it well above the minimum specs for handling VR games both from Steam and the Oculus Store. And after a few days with my desktop in my family room, I loved putting that away without having to worry about dragging it back out. Instead, I can just set up the relatively small, organized gaming laptop when it’s time for more VR.

Analysts with research firms like SuperData predict that VR could generate $40 billion in revenues by 2020. That’s a big number, and that kind of spending could rub off on other categories like the companies that produce gaming-specific PC hardware. MSI, along with companies like Razer and Gigabyte, are well positioned to take advantage of this.

Money and power

VR requires a lot of processing power. That’s the key here. It takes a lot of juice to render games at 90 frames per second for each eye. Developers need to hit that in order to make a comfortable experience that doesn’t make the player nauseous. But studios will only reliably reach that threshold if they are targeting PC systems with some high-end components.

The minimum-spec machine for Oculus Rift needs at least an Nvidia GTX 970 graphics card and an Intel i5-4590 processor. You can build that into a large desktop case for around $900 or so. But if you’re looking to jump into VR by buying a new PC and a $600-to-$800 headset, then you’re already considering the prospect of spending a lot of money. And a gaming laptop isn’t that much more when you take everything into consideration.

The MSI machine I’m using sells for around $2,200, but those prices are likely going to start coming down as Nvidia ramps up production of its next-gen graphics cards. Even still, this is not exactly $2,200 versus $900. This MSI comes with a built-in SteelSeries keyboard, and those can easily sell for $150. It also comes with an Nvidia G-Sync monitor, and those start at around $400. Having all of that in one shell is convenient and potentially worth the extra cost because you are getting some very serious benefits for VR when you invest in a laptop like this.

The MSI Dominator.

Above: The MSI Dominator.

Image Credit: MSI

A gaming laptop is minuscule compared to a full gaming rig

Today, when we talk about VR, we’re primarily talking about the HTC Vive and the Oculus Rift. Eventually, we’ll also have the PlayStation VR and future generations of the Gear VR phone head-mounted display. But, for now, high-end VR requires a connection to a PC. Another thing about this technology is that it takes up a lot of space.

Most notably, the Vive has several games that work best when you clear floor space for its room-scale position-tracking features. This enables you to walk around inside of simulated spaces, and this has led to some of my favorite VR moments yet. Oculus Rift is primarily for use while sitting down, but that’s going to change later this year with the arrival of Oculus Touch.

This all means that your space is at a premium, and it is much easier to maximize the square footage of your VR room when you’re dealing with a laptop instead of a giant gaming rig. When I had my desktop in the family room, I had to put it in place where it would physical fit along with the monitor, keyboard, and mouse. I needed my narrow stand-up desk to properly organize all of this crap. It still took up a huge chunk of the floor, and that’s without worrying about the cords tangling and crisscrossing one another all over the ground.

This is a lot to drag around.

Above: This is a lot to drag around.

Image Credit: iBuyPower

With the laptop, I just need to ensure that it is in a place where the cords from the Vive or Rift can reach the furthers corner of the play space. This makes for a much more compact and clean solution. I don’t need a desk, I can just set my laptop on an end table next to the lamp. It has its own monitor and keyboard, so I also don’t have cables everywhere.

Having that extra space and organization is a huge positive when it comes to using a gaming laptop in a VR setup.

VR is best when shared

The best thing by far about using a laptop for VR is that it’s so much easier to get out and put away. If I had to lug my desktop downstairs every time I wanted to do room-scale VR, I’d probably rarely do so.

I don’t want to permanently turn any one of my household rooms into a “VR dungeon.” Having the laptop gives me the option for a quick setup if I find out that friends are coming over or that my wife wants to try AudioShield again.

The laptop is also — despite its large size compared to something like a MacBook Air — portable. I can throw the Rift into a bag and the MSI onto the passenger seat of my car, and I’m ready to take the VR show on the road. That process is a lot more complicated when it’s a desktop, and chances are your friends won’t even want you to bring it over if they find out you’re gonna spend the first 30 minutes of your visit setting up a giant PC.

When I travel home to see my family — something I only do once a year — I’m gonna want to show them the Rift and Vive. Without a gaming laptop, that wasn’t an option. No way in hell am I ever going to pack up my tower to fly across the country. But I may invest in the laptop to ensure I can make that happen.

Now, of course, a VR-capable laptop isn’t all joy. A self-contained portable computer powerful enough to run Rift and Vive games is going to cost a lot more than a comparable desktop. And for most people, the desktop is still probably the best answer. But I can’t deny how much of an improved experience it is to have a laptop ready to go for VR. If that’s your main concern, I would argue that you should at least consider it as an option.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Grand Theft Auto studio says former director’s lawsuit is ‘without merit’ and ‘downright bizarre’

Leslie Benzies and Dan Houser accepting an award.

Rockstar Games is now defending itself in the public as well as in court.

The Grand Theft Auto developer has responded to a lawsuit from the game’s former director Leslie Benzies by filing a countersuit of its own and providing GamesBeat with a statement about the case. Benzies’ complaint is asking publisher Take-Two Interactive, Rockstar Games, and Rockstar founders Dan and Sam Houser to pay $150 million in royalties. In an earlier statement, Benzies’ legal counsel referred to Take-Two and Rockstar’s countersuit as ‘sparse,’ and now Rockstar is hitting back with claims that the former director’s original filing is “downright bizarre.” This battle is waging over one of the $99.3 billion gaming industry’s biggest properties, and it could also reveal some internal secrets of one that business’s most secretive studios.

“Leslie Benzies was a valued employee of our company for many years,” reads the Rockstar Games statement provided to GamesBeat. “Sadly, the events that culminated in his resignation ultimately stem from his significant performance and conduct issues. Despite our repeated efforts to address and resolve these issues amicably both before and after his departure, Leslie has chosen to take this route in an attempt to set aside contract terms to which he previously agreed on multiple occasions.”

In the original complaint from Benzies, the former president of Rockstar North preemptively addressed some of these claims. That filing references Sam Houser allegedly threatening to blame Benzies’ incompetence for the delays of GTA V and GTA: Online. In response to that, Benzies suit includes several emails throughout the launch period of those games where Houser praises Benzies.

The Rockstar Games statement continues by dismissing all of lawsuit’s assertions.

“[Benzies’] claims are entirely without merit and in many instances downright bizarre, and we are very confident this matter will be resolved in our favor,” reads the statement. “A core ethos since Rockstar’s inception has been the concept of ‘the team.’  It is deeply disappointing and simply wrong for Leslie to attempt to take personal credit for what has always been the tremendous efforts of the entire Rockstar team, who remain hard at work delivering the most immersive and engaging entertainment experiences we can for our fans. We do not intend to comment further on this matter.”

Rockstar’s comment regarding “the team” here is a reference to Benzies taking credit for many of the innovations that turned both Grand Theft Auto III and GTA: Online into massive successes. It is worth pointing out, however, that the Rockstar Games “team” are not eligible for a share of the royalties from the GTA games. That agreement only included Benzies and the Housers, so it is in Rockstar’s interest to de-emphasize his role.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook









Grand Theft Auto studio says former director’s lawsuit is ‘without merit’ and ‘downright bizarre’

Leslie Benzies and Dan Houser accepting an award.

Rockstar Games is now defending itself in the public as well as in court.

The Grand Theft Auto developer has responded to a lawsuit from the game’s former director Leslie Benzies by filing a countersuit of its own and providing GamesBeat with a statement about the case. Benzies’ complaint is asking publisher Take-Two Interactive, Rockstar Games, and Rockstar founders Dan and Sam Houser to pay $150 million in royalties. In an earlier statement, Benzies’ legal counsel referred to Take-Two and Rockstar’s countersuit as ‘sparse,’ and now Rockstar is hitting back with claims that the former director’s original filing is “downright bizarre.” This battle is waging over one of the $99.3 billion gaming industry’s biggest properties, and it could also reveal some internal secrets of one that business’s most secretive studios.

“Leslie Benzies was a valued employee of our company for many years,” reads the Rockstar Games statement provided to GamesBeat. “Sadly, the events that culminated in his resignation ultimately stem from his significant performance and conduct issues. Despite our repeated efforts to address and resolve these issues amicably both before and after his departure, Leslie has chosen to take this route in an attempt to set aside contract terms to which he previously agreed on multiple occasions.”

In the original complaint from Benzies, the former president of Rockstar North preemptively addressed some of these claims. That filing references Sam Houser allegedly threatening to blame Benzies’ incompetence for the delays of GTA V and GTA: Online. In response to that, Benzies suit includes several emails throughout the launch period of those games where Houser praises Benzies.

The Rockstar Games statement continues by dismissing all of lawsuit’s assertions.

“[Benzies’] claims are entirely without merit and in many instances downright bizarre, and we are very confident this matter will be resolved in our favor,” reads the statement. “A core ethos since Rockstar’s inception has been the concept of ‘the team.’  It is deeply disappointing and simply wrong for Leslie to attempt to take personal credit for what has always been the tremendous efforts of the entire Rockstar team, who remain hard at work delivering the most immersive and engaging entertainment experiences we can for our fans. We do not intend to comment further on this matter.”

Rockstar’s comment regarding “the team” here is a reference to Benzies taking credit for many of the innovations that turned both Grand Theft Auto III and GTA: Online into massive successes. It is worth pointing out, however, that the Rockstar Games “team” are not eligible for a share of the royalties from the GTA games. That agreement only included Benzies and the Housers, so it is in Rockstar’s interest to de-emphasize his role.

More information:

Get more stories like this on TwitterFacebook