ASO master class: How to get 40K app downloads for free and other growth hacks (webinar)

app store.shutterstock_302135009

You could spend $10K to drive paid traffic and get some users — or you can growth-hack and land 40,000 downloads in just a few days. What’s the secret? Join top ASO gurus for this free half-hour master class in getting your app ranked, fast.

Register here for free.


“There’s this notion that you build a great app, and people will find it. Unfortunately that’s just not true anymore,” says Steve P. Young, ASO wizard and founder of App Masters.

Young, the host of the top mobile app podcast, has been picking the brains of hundreds of mobile developers since 2013. He’s successfully launched hundreds of new apps with his PR firm, Runway.bz. And he knows what mistakes make an app sink — and more importantly, how to make it rise.

App store and app marketing optimization (ASO and AMO), Young emphasizes, is not optional any more. “With the cost per installs continually going up,” he says, “you’re just going to have to spend a lot more money to get that visibility if you’re not doing ASO.”

App store optimization, he explains, is essentially SEO for the app store, juiced to drive organic growth by finding users with intent: those who are organically searching for your app, or your type of app. And those users are out there looking for you. Approximately 60 percent of app store users are there to search for particular apps.

The users who are pleased to find your app turn up at the top of their search results are going to have a better user experience, which is going to make them a better, and more profitable, long-term user.

Getting ranked requires surprisingly easy tweaks that can be made and updated instantly: ensuring your icon is eye-catching, and optimizing your description. Young has seen downloads double when developers get just these key elements right.

And there are short-term boosts you can leverage right away. “You can get downloads and not have to pay a cent,” Young says. He’s seen his favorite growth hack used successfully over and over: running a paid-to-free campaign where you where you make a paid app available for free for a couple of days. His first experiment with the technique netted him over 40,000 downloads in just a few days.

The key is getting press in the sites that track paid-to-free campaigns. “Coverage in one of these media outlets drives huge amounts of downloads,” Young says. And that’s the kind of action that drives you to the top of the app store charts, netting you more organic users. Not many traditional app marketing strategies are as elegant, easy — and free.

To learn more about the innovative tips, tricks and hacks that get your app onto the phones of the users you want, join our free webinar, “Growthhacking your app store downloads via AMO.”


Don’t miss out!

Register here for free.


In this half hour ASO masterclass, you’ll learn:

  • The tools, tips, and techniques to get your app in front of your audience and top of mind with app stores
  • How to identify the small changes in components, such as your in-app purchase descriptions, that will have big impact on downloads
  • The differences between Google Play and Apple’s App Store, and map how you should adapt your ASO/AMO strategy for both

Speakers:

  • Peggy Anne Salz, analyst, VentureBeat
  • Steve P. Young, ASO ‘wizard’ and founder of App Masters

Moderator:

  • Wendy Schuchart, analyst, VentureBeat









ASO master class: How to get 40K app downloads for free and other growth hacks (webinar)

app store.shutterstock_302135009

You could spend $10K to drive paid traffic and get some users — or you can growth-hack and land 40,000 downloads in just a few days. What’s the secret? Join top ASO gurus for this free half-hour master class in getting your app ranked, fast.

Register here for free.


“There’s this notion that you build a great app, and people will find it. Unfortunately that’s just not true anymore,” says Steve P. Young, ASO wizard and founder of App Masters.

Young, the host of the top mobile app podcast, has been picking the brains of hundreds of mobile developers since 2013. He’s successfully launched hundreds of new apps with his PR firm, Runway.bz. And he knows what mistakes make an app sink — and more importantly, how to make it rise.

App store and app marketing optimization (ASO and AMO), Young emphasizes, is not optional any more. “With the cost per installs continually going up,” he says, “you’re just going to have to spend a lot more money to get that visibility if you’re not doing ASO.”

App store optimization, he explains, is essentially SEO for the app store, juiced to drive organic growth by finding users with intent: those who are organically searching for your app, or your type of app. And those users are out there looking for you. Approximately 60 percent of app store users are there to search for particular apps.

The users who are pleased to find your app turn up at the top of their search results are going to have a better user experience, which is going to make them a better, and more profitable, long-term user.

Getting ranked requires surprisingly easy tweaks that can be made and updated instantly: ensuring your icon is eye-catching, and optimizing your description. Young has seen downloads double when developers get just these key elements right.

And there are short-term boosts you can leverage right away. “You can get downloads and not have to pay a cent,” Young says. He’s seen his favorite growth hack used successfully over and over: running a paid-to-free campaign where you where you make a paid app available for free for a couple of days. His first experiment with the technique netted him over 40,000 downloads in just a few days.

The key is getting press in the sites that track paid-to-free campaigns. “Coverage in one of these media outlets drives huge amounts of downloads,” Young says. And that’s the kind of action that drives you to the top of the app store charts, netting you more organic users. Not many traditional app marketing strategies are as elegant, easy — and free.

To learn more about the innovative tips, tricks and hacks that get your app onto the phones of the users you want, join our free webinar, “Growthhacking your app store downloads via AMO.”


Don’t miss out!

Register here for free.


In this half hour ASO masterclass, you’ll learn:

  • The tools, tips, and techniques to get your app in front of your audience and top of mind with app stores
  • How to identify the small changes in components, such as your in-app purchase descriptions, that will have big impact on downloads
  • The differences between Google Play and Apple’s App Store, and map how you should adapt your ASO/AMO strategy for both

Speakers:

  • Peggy Anne Salz, analyst, VentureBeat
  • Steve P. Young, ASO ‘wizard’ and founder of App Masters

Moderator:

  • Wendy Schuchart, analyst, VentureBeat









ASO master class: How to get 40K app downloads for free and other growth hacks (webinar)

app store.shutterstock_302135009

You could spend $10K to drive paid traffic and get some users — or you can growth-hack and land 40,000 downloads in just a few days. What’s the secret? Join top ASO gurus for this free half-hour master class in getting your app ranked, fast.

Register here for free.


“There’s this notion that you build a great app, and people will find it. Unfortunately that’s just not true anymore,” says Steve P. Young, ASO wizard and founder of App Masters.

Young, the host of the top mobile app podcast, has been picking the brains of hundreds of mobile developers since 2013. He’s successfully launched hundreds of new apps with his PR firm, Runway.bz. And he knows what mistakes make an app sink — and more importantly, how to make it rise.

App store and app marketing optimization (ASO and AMO), Young emphasizes, is not optional any more. “With the cost per installs continually going up,” he says, “you’re just going to have to spend a lot more money to get that visibility if you’re not doing ASO.”

App store optimization, he explains, is essentially SEO for the app store, juiced to drive organic growth by finding users with intent: those who are organically searching for your app, or your type of app. And those users are out there looking for you. Approximately 60 percent of app store users are there to search for particular apps.

The users who are pleased to find your app turn up at the top of their search results are going to have a better user experience, which is going to make them a better, and more profitable, long-term user.

Getting ranked requires surprisingly easy tweaks that can be made and updated instantly: ensuring your icon is eye-catching, and optimizing your description. Young has seen downloads double when developers get just these key elements right.

And there are short-term boosts you can leverage right away. “You can get downloads and not have to pay a cent,” Young says. He’s seen his favorite growth hack used successfully over and over: running a paid-to-free campaign where you where you make a paid app available for free for a couple of days. His first experiment with the technique netted him over 40,000 downloads in just a few days.

The key is getting press in the sites that track paid-to-free campaigns. “Coverage in one of these media outlets drives huge amounts of downloads,” Young says. And that’s the kind of action that drives you to the top of the app store charts, netting you more organic users. Not many traditional app marketing strategies are as elegant, easy — and free.

To learn more about the innovative tips, tricks and hacks that get your app onto the phones of the users you want, join our free webinar, “Growthhacking your app store downloads via AMO.”


Don’t miss out!

Register here for free.


In this half hour ASO masterclass, you’ll learn:

  • The tools, tips, and techniques to get your app in front of your audience and top of mind with app stores
  • How to identify the small changes in components, such as your in-app purchase descriptions, that will have big impact on downloads
  • The differences between Google Play and Apple’s App Store, and map how you should adapt your ASO/AMO strategy for both

Speakers:

  • Peggy Anne Salz, analyst, VentureBeat
  • Steve P. Young, ASO ‘wizard’ and founder of App Masters

Moderator:

  • Wendy Schuchart, analyst, VentureBeat









Cloud data warehouses: Why simple is better (webinar)

cloud data 2.shutterstock_228273733 (1)

Collecting data is easy compared to knowing what to do with it. Join us for this fast-paced webinar to understand how databases and data warehouses come into play with a truly world-class data analytics strategy.

Register here for free.


We’ve all heard the phrase “Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems,” but for the tech industry it’s “Mo Data, Mo Problems.”

Big data routinely offers new and far-reaching opportunities for businesses to expand their market. However, the complexities involved in processing such large amounts of data can lead to monumental headaches. Trying to find meaning in customer data, log data, inventory data, search data, and so on can be intimidating for marketers given the continuous flow of information. In fact, a 2014 Duke CMO Survey showed that 65 percent of respondents said they lack the ability to really measure marketing impact accurately.

Data analytics cannot be ignored and the industry knows this full well, as 60 percent of CIOs are prioritizing big data analytics for the 2016/2017 budget cycles. It’s why you see companies turning to data warehouses to solve their analytic woes.

But one simply can’t hop on any data warehouse and call it a day. There are a variety of data warehouse platforms and vendors to choose from and the large volume of platforms can be overwhelming for any business, let alone first-timers. Many questions regarding your purchase of a data warehouse must be answered: How many platforms is too much for the size of my company? What am I looking for in performance and availability? Which platforms are cloud-based operations?

This is why we’ve assembled some crack data warehouse practitioners for our one-hour webinar on the subject. Grega Kešpret, the Director of Engineering, Analytics at Celtra — the fast-growing provider of creative technology for data-driven digital display advertising — will instruct attendees on how to build high-performance data processing pipeline capable of processing over 2 billion analytics events per day.

We’ll also hear from Jon Bock, VP of Marketing and Products at Snowflake, a data warehouse company that secured $45 million in funding from leading venture capital firms such as Altimeter Capital, Redpoint Ventures, and Sutter Hill Ventures.

Mo’ data no longer has to mean mo’ problems. Join our webinar and learn how to acquire the best data warehouse platform for your business, and most importantly, know what to do with it.


Don’t miss out!

Register here for free.


In this webinar you’ll:

  • Learn how to build a simpler, faster way to support your data analytics
  • Support diverse reporting and ad hoc analytics in one system
  • Understand what your users are doing in different sessions rather than just aggregating data
  • Scale your strategy to handle semi-structured JSON data without complex transformations or performance trade-offs

Speakers:

  • Grega Kešpret, Director of Engineering, Analytics, Celtra
  • Jon Bock, VP of Marketing and Products, Snowflake

Moderator:

  • Evan Schuman, Moderator, VentureBeat

    This webinar is sponsored by Snowflake.










Bluefly pivots to mobile as the default ecommerce experience

VentureBeat-hero-1

This sponsored post is produced in association with Mozu.


Mobile has moved on from being “the new black” in ecommerce to become the default experience. And while customer engagement can be a journey, making a purchase should never be — customers want push-button purchasing ability that they can do wherever whenever.

Bluefly understands the important role mobile plays in ecommerce. The ecommerce retailer recently transitioned from a traditional retail model to a fashion and design marketplace with over 2,500 brands, relaunching their website with a significant focus on creating a robust and integrated mobile front to facilitate a holistic customer experience for their users.

“People have been talking about ‘the year of mobile,’ but we like to call it ‘the year of NO mobile,’ because there’s no distinction anymore. Everything is mobile now,” says Carly Rosenberg, President of Bluefly. “We need to stop talking about this as a separate channel because mobile is the channel.

That said, it took some proactive investments for Bluefly to move to the head of the pack on the mobile front

Mobile and a holistic customer experience

Bluefly started out with a popular ecommerce platform, but it proved difficult to manage and required heavy resources. After six months of serious deliberation over picking another ecommerce platform, they decided to go with cloud commerce platform Mozu for their relaunch.

Mobile was the main catalyst for the switch. Bluefly saw roughly half of its traffic and a third of its conversion via mobile even before it transitioned to Mozu as an ecommerce platform. The company observed that because they had a poor mobile experience, mobile users would wait until they could log back in using desktops before buying. Desktop conversion was 3X as much as mobile. There was no question they were losing transactions.

Older ecommerce platforms – like the one Bluefly used before – were specialized for desktop or laptop experiences. Mobile was an add-on, which is a common pain point for many online retailers. As a result of lack of mobile integration on the part of ecommerce platform vendors, ecommerce companies have had to develop and maintain separate mobile sites, and the integration of both the customer experience and administration across screens has been next to impossible to manage smoothly.

In addition to struggling to make mobile conversions, it was impossible for Bluefly to create and schedule push notifications with its old platform. This meant that Bluefly — and other ecommerce companies stuck on similar platforms — had to prioritize one screen experience over others. With the Mozu platform, Bluefly is now able to keep its customers engaged with the creation and scheduling of push notifications, and update content on mobile, desktop, and app within the same tool.

Customer adoption has outpaced retail’s response

Bluefly was not alone in experiencing these pain points. Customer adoption of mobile technology has been much faster than ecommerce companies have been able to keep up with — it’s such a rapid shift that many of the most widely-used platform vendors of the past decade have been rendered obsolete by users going “mobile first.”

Now, ecommerce companies have interconnected needs that all stem from the same roots: the need to meet customers on mobile. Retailers require integrated management for content, pricing, promotions, and customer communication. Customer information and carts need to be seamlessly unified, with payment options and preferences saved throughout the customer’s experience and across screens.

With Bluefly’s relaunch, the company can seamlessly transition between screens and customer information is carried through — they can also integrate with third-party personalization vendors if they prefer through the Mozu Marketplace.

And personalization is right up there with omnichannel customer experiences when it comes to the priorities of ecommerce companies today.

“Personalization [is] an area we knew we needed to improve. We have over 2,500 brands, but it’s difficult to have that many brands in front of one customer,” Rosenberg says. “We’ve been wanting to build preference and personalization tools to help understand what customers look for in certain brands and get those brands in front of the customers on a more tailored basis.” The Mozu platform has segmentation built into its core, which is even extended to functions like push notifications and analytics.

The future of Bluefly and ecommerce

All the barriers that prevent mobile from becoming the default channel for ecommerce are going away, says Rosenberg. “Any friction that’s in the mobile purchase path is going to get better. Take mobile payments; it’s probably one of the hardest things to do well on mobile right now and you’re going to see that friction melt away too.”

The new normal for customer behavior will transform how retailers operate. Companies will tailor their services and products specifically for a “mobile first” generation, at times even completely ignoring the more traditional desktop.

“I was talking with a friend who just started a new company; she’s totally focused on in-app advertising,” Rosenberg says, “They’re not even looking at desktop advertising, and they are already having incredible success focusing on the mobile generation.”

It appears the future of ecommerce is already here, and it’s all happening on mobile.


Sponsored posts are content that has been produced by a company that is either paying for the post or has a business relationship with VentureBeat, and they’re always clearly marked. The content of news stories produced by our editorial team is never influenced by advertisers or sponsors in any way. For more information, contact [email protected].










Mobile user acquisition fraud: Rovio and others share how to fight it (webinar)

angry-birds-2

How do you combat user acquisition scams that are increasingly slick and nearly undetectable? Find out from the front line how pros are successfully combating mobile fraud.

Access the webinar on demand right here.


You’re spending up to $25 per high-quality user — but how many of them are real? User acquisition fraud has doubled since 2015. Unreliable install and conversion rates threaten your rank in the Google and Apple stores and squander a significant chunk of your already tight marketing budget.

Is there any hope for mobile app developers? To find out, VentureBeat gathered pros from the front line who have diagnosed, identified, and successfully combated fraud: Eric Seufert, VP of user acquisition at Rovio Entertainment — the company that blew up the mobile gaming industry with Angry Birds; Yevgeny Peres, VP of Growth at Supersonic by ironSource; and Paul H. Müller, CTO at adjust.

It’s an ugly scene at first glance. Years of security neglect from all three players — publishers, ad networks, and advertisers — has led to increasingly sophisticated scams.

“Most likely if you’re running an ad for your app right now, there’s an extremely high chance that this is happening to you,” Müller says. In a test scan against 1.5k clients with 10k apps, not a single publisher with an advertiser was spared.

Everyone is affected: Crooks are diluting the value of advertisers, ad networks are losing money because they have to issue refunds, and legit publishers are finding it harder than ever to earn revenue.

And the good news is that the industry is finally waking up to what’s going on, beginning to talk about it in a transparent way as well as share insights, says Müller. “All of us combined can really put a stop to this.”

Each member of the ecosystem has a different view into user patterns and signals, which is uncovering more sophisticated ways to refine detection algorithms and develop tools that can analyze behavior on the impression and click level in real time.

The technology is rising to the occasion, but can marketers harness it? The problem, Seufert says, is that for marketers, handling fraud detection and prevention in-house is becoming prohibitively expensive as the technology matures.

“You would have to have an entire staff dedicated,” he says. “You need so many people at that point you start to question whether you’re a mobile game developer or mobile commerce company or an ad tech company.”

There’s just no reason that a mobile games developer should be focusing on this technology in-house, he argues. “It’s too sophisticated, it’s too far beyond the scope of their primary objective, which is to make great games, and it’s too expensive to bear that, given the opportunity cost of what those engineers could be doing and the benefit of that.”

Marketers never have the full picture, Peres says. And this is where companies like adjust, a business intelligence platform that offers a fraud protection suite, are very well positioned in terms of the data they have access to.

“400-500 million daily users allows you to see what non-human behavior looks like,” Müller agrees, as well as organic user behavior on a scale that publishers, advertisers, and networks need access to.

In the end, fighting fraud will never snuff it out completely; the real goal of fraud prevention is to make fraud unprofitable — to push the level of prevention sophistication so high that it is simply easier and more profitable to do something else with your criminal energy and time. And the mobile app ecosystem is finally rising to the challenge.

To find out more about what fraud looks like and the tools that marketers and advertisers need to leverage to fix their ROI, listen to how pros are doing it.


Don’t miss out!

Register here for free.


In this webinar, you’ll learn:

  • What user acquisition fraud is, and its many forms
  • How to identify campaigns and publishers associated with illegitimate traffic
  • How datasets can be cleaned and payouts reclaimed once fraud is identified

Speakers:

  • Eric Seufert, VP of User Acquisition, Rovio
  • Yevgeny Peres, VP of Growth, Supersonic by ironSource
  • Paul H. Müller, CTO at adjust

Moderator:

  • Evan Schuman, Moderator, VentureBeat

    This webinar is sponsored by adjust.










3 key ways to improve your subscriber value

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Guaranteed residual revenue through subscription models is hugely attractive and highly scalable — but missteps could lead to costly attrition and churn. Join Netflix Head of Payments Luis Vargas to learn how payment models factor into success and how to turn subscribers into the profitable customers you hanker for.

Register here for free.


Back in the day, a subscription service meant a membership to the gym, not a way to binge on online videos during the weekend. Those days are long gone. Subscription models popularized by Netflix and the like have changed the way consumers buy and consume content and products. The affordability, accessibility, and variety associated with subscription services have led to big profits and happy customers. Just look at 75 million subscribers Netflix has under its belt. Or, the 20 million paying subscribers and 75 million active users on Spotify. Or services like the beauty box subscription company Birchbox and grocery delivery and meal planning service Blue Apron.

We’ve all seen what happens when businesses fail to grasp consumers’ love of subscription services through the rise and fall of Blockbuster, but that doesn’t mean any subscription plan is better than none. Despite signing up A-list musicians and having the Jay Z brand, Tidal continues to struggle in growing paying subscribers to match its more profitable competitors. Any business devising a successful subscription model must take in great consideration what makes the service attractive to consumers in the first place.

Being aware of the domestic and global trends in the online market is a good start. Did you know that newer, and avid, internet users in BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) are more willing to subscribe than U.S. and UK markets? Key information like this will help you better plan out your subscription prices internationally and at home. Speaking of pricing, understanding the psychological aspects of subscription services will help your business attract more customers, such as this Yale study showing consumers are less likely to buy an item if it’s paired with a similar item at the same price, than if the prices were slightly different.

For this webinar, we put together three vital ways for businesses to improve their subscriber value by a significant margin. This webinar features Netflix Head of Payment Luis Vargas. Register today to learn how to improve your subscription service for your company and customers.


Don’t miss out.

Register here for free.


In this webinar, you’ll:

  • Learn how to convert your users into long term subscribers for revenue you can count on
  • Improve your payment system to actually increase overall revenue
  • Get insight into the changing feel of a global marketplace as it pertains to your untapped subscriber base

 Speakers:

  • Luis Vargas, Head of Payments, Netflix
  • Evan Schuman, Moderator, VentureBeat

More speakers to be announced soon.


This webinar is sponsored by Worldpay.

 

More information:









Calling all entrepreneurs: France wants your help to build a strong economic future…and its wallet is open

paris.shutterstock_328092254

This sponsored post is produced in association with BPIFrance.


Investing in companies these days can be pretty easy. You do some research into firms with a good potential for revenue and profit — maybe get a hot tip from a friend or relative — then find a broker and give them a few bucks to stake your investment. From there, you can just sit back and hope for a good return.

France has decided it wants to invest some major money into its future, but it’s taking a much more pro-active approach with its investment method. So, it’s created its own version of a startup jam to seek out and incubate entrepreneurial thinking, then turn those projects into actual companies that are doing business in the country.

In 2013, France President François Hollande called for the creation of the Innovation 2030 Committee, with plans “to confront the major challenges of the world of 2030.” The committee was tasked to find sources of innovation and entrepreneurship that could spark the country’s economy and employment over the next few decades.

In turn, the Innovation 2030 Committee created the Worldwide Innovation Challenge to take pitches from companies with great ideas, determine the best out of the bunch, and then, through the government’s “public investment bank” BPIFrance, seed those companies with funds to get their ideas off the ground. France pledged 300 million Euros in funding to back the Worldwide Innovation Challenge, and companies can either be French or foreign countries willing “to set up shop in France.” In addition, the challenge enables companies to get higher visibility for their work and helps them connect to other business entrepreneurs and innovators.

According to Catherine Borg-Capra, director of innovation at BPIFrance, the committee is currently running two Challenge campaigns concurrently. The First Challenge (which began in 2014 with 110 project proposals each receiving 200,000 Euros) is in the third phase, called the “industrialisation” phase, where five to ten “winning projects” will be funded 10–20 million Euros each to build their businesses.

Meanwhile, the Second Challenge has gone into its second phase, called the “risk reduction” stage, where companies are funded with 1–3 million Euros each for “wider-ranging development work” to better formulate their business ideas, undertake further research and development efforts, and hire initial staff that’s limited to researchers, engineers, and technicians.

It’s important to note, however, that BPIFrance is still willing to consider new project proposals that hadn’t previously been submitted during the challenge’s initial start-up period (at the end of 2015) and move them into the second phase. Borg-Capra has seen some great project ideas already, but she’s hoping that putting out a fresh call for proposals will bring more geographic diversity.

“The ambition of the challenge was to get international projects. I have to admit that we didn’t get a lot of projects from other countries; it was more of a French challenge, because all of the ‘lauréats’ were French companies,” Borg-Capra said. “I’m kind of frustrated, because we were hoping to attract nice international projects and companies that will be willing to come and develop their projects in France. We’re still open to new candidates.”

Business focus for applicants

Companies applying for the challenge need to have their businesses focused in one of eight different strategic areas:

  1. Energy storage
  2. Collecting, sorting, and recycling materials
  3. Development of marine resources — metals and seawater desalination
  4. Development of plant protein-based food products and plant chemistry projects aiming to develop new materials
  5. Personalized medicine — individualized targeted therapeutic interventions, based, for example, on genomics, medical devices, and/or high-resolution imagery
  6. Silver economy — answering the elderly’s needs
  7. Big Data — improved use of big data and definition of new usages, analytical models, and promotion
  8. Innovative projects on public security and protection against threats

The First Challenge only had the initial seven areas of focus, while the Second Challenge added the eighth based on the growing terrorism threat worldwide and the two devastating attacks that took place in Paris in 2015.

“We added [the security] focus because we suddenly realized that there was something missing, and we want France to innovate in this area,” Borg-Capra said. “It’s really important for France, and we believe this will be a major focus right now and in coming years.”

Examples of success

Borg-Capra gave us some examples of project ideas that have made it into the First Challenge’s third phase, which show the range of ideas that have been pitched and subsequently funded. With BPIFrance’s financial help, these projects are preparing to begin offering actual products for sale:

  • Robosoft is working on a “silver economy” project that’s setting out to create the Kompaï-2, a KEPA (knowledge, e-health, people, and assistance) robotic aid that can help dependent seniors with their physical and cognitive needs on a 24-hour basis at their homes or in care facilities. This help can come in the form of monitoring the person’s status, generating alerts, and even summoning caregivers to intervene as needed.
  • Enerbee is seeking to do away with the “button cell” batteries that power small devices, such as hearing aids and watches, and replace them with microgenerators that work off the user’s movement. The system will not only generate the power the device needs from small amounts of motion, but also offer some storage that’ll keep the device running through intermittent breaks in power generation.
  • OsseoMatrix is a “personalized medicine” company that aims to offer patients who’ve experienced bone loss—ranging from “moderate to severe” — with implants that require less invasive and less painful surgery than the current bone-grafting process. The patient’s bone loss is scanned and imaged, so the process can precisely determine the exact shape of the replacement that’s needed, and then a 3D printer is used to generate a synthetic “bioceramic” implant. Patients spend less time recovering in a hospital, so costs are lowered while optimal effectiveness is maintained.

As you can see, the First Challenge has brought some stunning developments, but Borg-Capra said she’s even more excited by the prospects that are coming from the Second Challenge, which has inspired over 300 project proposals so far.

“With this challenge, we were really surprised about the number of candidates, but very surprised about the quality of the candidates that have answered to this challenge. We have seen some very innovative projects and companies,” she stated. “It’s why we launched the Second Challenge, and I believe we will be able to continue with a Third and Fourth Challenge.”

Clearly, France is going above and beyond with its Innovation 2030 investments. But the country knows there’s a lot at stake, so it’s doing more than just sitting back and hoping for a good return on its economic future. It’s spearheading entrepreneurial activity at a scale rarely seen at a governmental level.


Sponsored posts are content that has been produced by a company that is either paying for the post or has a business relationship with VentureBeat, and they’re always clearly marked. The content of news stories produced by our editorial team is never influenced by advertisers or sponsors in any way. For more information, contact [email protected].










How Bitly’s CEO believes marketers can fight Apple, Google, and Facebook and take control of the omnichannel challenge (webinar)

bitly-fish

Customer touch-points are multiplying, and so are engagement technologies. Join crack minds in marketing as they discuss how to adopt an effective omnichannel strategy that unifies the customer experience.

Register here for free.


“The promise of technology is that it makes the world and life easier for marketers,” says Mark Josephson, CEO of Bitly. “In fact, it’s actually done the opposite.”

Marketers are now responsible for owning the entire customer journey and lifecycle from top-of-funnel awareness to acquisitions and lifetime value. And that means they need to touch the customer in every single channel.

The major roadblock, says Josephson, is that in a world where mobile dominates, three companies are making big bets on owning that consumer experience: Apple, Google, and Facebook. It’s the challenge that Bitly, historically known globally as a premiere URL-shortening service, has evolved to face, as it’s become a platform that allows marketers to leverage the link as an omnichannel marketing asset permitting measurement and analytics across channels.

Josephson, who says he’s passionate about giving marketers back control of the customer story will join a stellar panel who will dive into regaining ownership of the omnichannel journey.

It’s an ownership that’s being challenged, Josephson notes. Those three big players are leveraging tech innovations to build walled gardens, which makes it increasingly complicated for marketers to see clear across the internet and to own and maintain relationships with their customers.

“It is dramatically impacting marketers’ ability to own and control their story,” Josephson says, “and to own and control their customers’ journey.”

Marketers, he says, have an inherent need to be in control and have ownership of their activities and efforts. The proliferation and fragmentation of audiences and channels is creating a real dissonance for marketers as they lose control of the story and the ability to deliver the ideal customer experience.

“I think marketers largely are unaware of the potential impact of the moves that these companies are making to dis-intermediate them from owning their customer,” Josephson continues. “Marketers need to recognize that, and then take steps to be more proactive. They need to start shifting the power from the distribution platforms and back into their own hands.”

The easiest way to do that, Josephson says, is for marketers to build their own unified data strategy with the intent of owning the customer relationship across those channels. Silos need to be broken down completely, and data from across the enterprise needs to be aggregated, including teams that may not always work side by side, for example, the social, advertising, circulation, and acquisitions teams. Not surprisingly, Josephson has a particular interest in the role links play in an omnichannel strategy.

“Links are in every digital channel, whether you see them or not,” he says. “Every time you tap, click, or swipe, there’s a link there. The link is an elemental unit of digital marketing that can exist in all these channels and unite them all.”

To learn more about breaking down walled gardens and owning the omnichannel landscape, plus some of the biggest insights from VB’s Insight report, “Omnichannel trends: data, platforms, mobile, and commerce,” join our free webinar now.


Don’t miss out!

Register here for free.


What you’ll learn in this webinar:

  • Why today’s marketing automation solutions fall short of customer expectations
  • How winning omnichannel marketing strategies balance push notifications, in-app messages, email, and social communications
  • Why understanding users on a person level, and not device level, is critical in mobile
  • Why “Marketing” is evolving to “Communicating” and how to prepare for that transition

Speakers:

Mark Josephson, CEO, Bitly
Sean Blankenship, CMO, Coldwell Banker
Heather Marie, CEO, Shoppable
Stewart Rogers, director of marketing technology, VentureBeat

Moderator:

Wendy Schuchart, moderator, VentureBeat


This webinar is sponsored by IBM Marketing Cloud.










Alchemist Accelerator: Why there’s still lots of room for disruptive martech (webinar)

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Q1 research from VentureBeat Insight shows that the venture capital landscape for martech shows no sign of slowing down. Join Ravi Belani, partner at Alchemist Accelerator, Adam J. Plotkin, partner at ff Venture Capital, and VB analyst Jon Cifuentes to learn about the current martech landscape and what’s getting analysts excited.

Register here for free.


Alchemist Accelerator, a platinum-rated accelerator by the MIT Seed Accelerator Rankings, has seen over 60 percent of the companies they work with go on to close an institutional round within 12 months of graduating. So Ravi Belani, managing partner of Alchemist Accelerator, dismisses concerns about the martech startup market being saturated.

“The beautiful thing about tech is that you’re creating value,” says Belani. “It’s not a zero sum game.”

The reality is that the best companies actually create the market, especially as marketing shifts from a cost function to a revenue function, absorbing functionalities that used to be covered by sales. CMOs are seeing ROI on their marketing dollars and actually driving demand and driving real revenue for companies. It’s why CMO budgets are now larger than CTO budgets.

More importantly, Belani emphasizes, is how martech is evolving to meet new demands.

“I think some of the most exciting marketing tech startups are actually transforming how these companies are making money,” he says. “I wouldn’t worry about the discourse about whether we have too many marketing companies. The bigger question is whether you’re working on something that is driving fundamental, disruptive value.”

Companies that are pursuing aggressive, ambitious ways of transforming industries, Belani says, is what gets them really excited at Alchemist. “I’m looking for companies that aren’t constrained by traditional silos of marketing and are trying to take over whole industries,” he adds.

In other words, businesses that are expanding their view beyond an individual company’s tech to start thinking about making a play toward dominating an industry category as a whole.

“The beautiful thing about the marketing function is that you own a lot of the critical data,” Belani says. “And if you can own that data layer across the entire value chain, then there are new businesses and industries that can be created in a standalone way that weren’t created before.”

In the end, Belani says, “I would not worry too much about the competition. I would just focus really heavily on what you’re uniquely suited to do and if you’re doing something that’s disruptive and driving significant value.”

The beautiful thing about fundraising, Belani says, is that it doesn’t matter what the average investor thinks of you. All that matters is finding those one or two investors that believe in what you’re doing. Your job is not to convince somebody why your idea is great. Your job is to find the investor that’s looking for you, and doesn’t know you exist.

The most successful founders are not successful because of some brilliant insight or raw intelligence, he maintains. Rather, persistence is the key.

“Literally just knocking on everybody’s door until you find the one that’s looking for you,” Belani says. “That’s your job. Your job is to just drive a process and not get knocked down.”

For more insight into industry disruption, owning your category, finding your VC match and more, make sure you make room for this 30-minute webinar.


Don’t miss out!

Register here for free.


During this webinar, you’ll learn:

  • How to get noticed by top VCs, straight from investors
  • Which types of companies are gaining funding
  • Where we’re seeing the biggest areas of consolidation
  • Who the most involved and most active VCs are
  • The implications for investors, vendors, and most importantly marketing technology buyers and users

Speakers:

  • Jon Cifuentes, analyst, VentureBeat
  • Ravi Belani, managing partner, Alchemist Accelerator
  • Adam J. Plotkin, partner, ff Venture Capital

Moderator:

  • Wendy Schuchart, analyst, VentureBeat

 

 


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