Melinda Gates fell in love with Bill Gates for his ‘brilliant mind’ and ‘huge sense of fun’

But as she steps up to champion her latest philanthropic cause, better lives for women worldwide , she’s publicly talking about all sorts of things, including her relationship with her famous husband, Microsoft cofounder and the world’s richest man, Bill Gates. Earlier this year, she told the story to Fortune’s Nina Easton of how Bill asked her out one Saturday morning in the company parking lot.

Aspiration launches new fund for values-driven investors.

Aspiration, an online investment firm geared toward values-driven investors , announced the launch of a new financial product with UBS Asset Management that balances a low entry threshold with a high standard for sustainable stewardship. The Aspiration Redwood Fund requires a $500 minimum investment from individuals, which puts them in a league with companies that demonstrate ethically responsible and sustainable environmental, labor, or governance practices .

Pantry’s fresh food kiosks represent a food industry undergoing massive change

image1


This sponsored post is produced in association with Panasonic Lab 1.0. 


You know the feeling: that mid-afternoon slump when M&Ms, or salted chips and a soda, will revive flagging energy so you can finish that report or get through the next meeting. Even though the pick-me-up will soon send your blood sugar crashing, it’s what’s on offer at the vending machine downstairs.

Alex Yancher to the rescue. Recognizing a groaning (as in empty stomach) need to make healthy food accessible when people want it, the culinary superhero has transformed traditional vending machines into healthy food on the go. Both a hardware and software solution, Pantry enables the unattended retail of fresh food via digitally operated kiosks, the next generation of vending machines.

Putting their money where the mouths are

Last month, the three-year old startup obtained another $1 million in seed financing, bringing its total funding since inception to 2.3 million.

There’s good reason — vending is ubiquitous. With five million US vending machines in operation, it’s rare to enter a hotel, hospital, or office building that doesn’t boast at least one. Since Pantry’s goal is to democratize access to fresh, healthy food, vending seemed a natural approach.

“The vending ecosystem does not work for fresh food,” explains Pantry co-founder Yancher. “Vending operators aren’t food producers, which means they have to order food from a third-party distributor. By the time your sandwich leaves the production facility, gets on a truck, gets placed into a warehouse, and gets to the machine, it’s been somewhere on the road for at least five days — which means it’s loaded with preservatives. And that’s the kind of food people are shying away from now. So we knew we had to rethink the entire industry.”


Join Pantry’s Alex Yancher along with food author Eve Turow and Feastly’s Noah Karesh for Grocery-a-Go-Go – a spirited live discussion about the ways grocery innovation is changing our relationship with food. Part of Panasonic’s Lab 1.0, the event takes place Thursday, November 12th from 6 to 8 p.m. in San Francisco. Register now to secure your spot.


Because typical vending operators are unfamiliar with fresh food delivery systems, Pantry opted to work exclusively with food service companies or branded local producers like Mixt Greens, or the food service companies that operate cafés at workplaces such as Stanford Hospital or Cisco Systems.

“We work directly with onsite cafés at a hospital or university or corporate campus, enabling them to keep selling their fresh food 24/7, spread across the campus. One example is Cisco Systems. Their café closes at 1:30. So if you’re hungry at 2 pm, before Pantry, you would be relegated to chips, candy, and soda from the vending machines.

“With Pantry, you still have access to the entire grab ‘n’ go set of options that you normally would if the café was open — and you have this access around the clock. You can get a fresh sandwich at 3 am. Moreover, there are so many of our kiosks on their spread-out campus that you don’t even have to walk all the way to the cafeteria to get that juice or sandwich; it’s right there in the building where you’re already working. Our mission is to shorten the distance between the food, consumer, and kitchen.”

Soda Fail: Junk food is so last millennium

What does Pantry innovation say about shifting food attitudes and expectations, from both the consumer and company standpoint?

“We’re becoming more discerning eaters,” says Yancher. “Consumers are really focused on fresh and healthy — and they’re willing to pay for it. People also want local cuisine. They want to know that the food they’re eating is sourced ethically and responsibly. And the food service industry and restaurant industry is catering to that.

“Companies are also starting to realize that providing fresh food and snacks is a necessary perk. Just the way free coffee is a no-brainer for offices to provide for employees, subsidized or even free food is becoming the norm as well.”

He illustrates: “Stanford Hospital used to have a vending machine in the hallway that sold preservative-laden triangle sandwiches as well as hot pockets. They opted to replace that machine with a Pantry. Sales from the original vending machine were approximately $500/month, which is actually pretty good for a vending machine. When we installed a Pantry kiosk, the very first month sales hit $3500 — a seven-fold increase.” That was their first appointment at Stanford; since then they’ve added several more units. The numbers tell the story: people are hungry for what Pantry provides.

SKU’d toward possibility

While Pantry doesn’t yet work with any grocery suppliers, there are plans to bring grocery staples directly to residential buildings. “We want to make the top-selling SKUs readily available to people at all times via our unattended kiosk in, say, the lobby of a condo complex or large apartment building,” explains Yancher.

Could tired residents coming home from work utilize a kiosk for dinner? Potentially. “We have an idea to retail meal kits with pre-cut veggies and pieces of meat for cooking, similar to the Blue Apron concept. Another approach is stocking the top-selling SKUs, which account for the majority of sales. Instead of having to get in your car and drive to Whole Foods to buy these staples, they’ll be available downstairs in the Pantry.”

Clearly, technology and the start-up community are radically reimagining the way food is acquired and consumed — and will continue to do so.

“I read about a guy who spent six months and $1,500 to make a sandwich from scratch. This was extreme, but I do think of the food space in terms of a value creation spectrum. Let’s say at the far left is what this guy did: grow your own vegetables and raise your own chicken or turkey. At the far right is a fully-prepared meal like you’d eat at a restaurant. Then there’s everything in the middle. You have Blue Apron, which will send you all the ingredients to prepare specific meals. You have Munchery, which will deliver ready-made refrigerated meals that you can heat up. I think in the next two to five years the sweet spots along this value chain will start to get flushed out: what’s more compelling, a ready-to-eat hot meal, or a set of ingredients for you to make at home? The jury’s still out, but some of these will prove to be niche, while others will go mainstream.”

Yancher also sees a growing popularity in kitchen technologies that will help to promote the blossoming in-home prep ecosystem, like Sous-vide devices such as Mellow or Nomiku. “Everybody can become a sous-chef at home with these cool devices.”

It’s part of unstoppable change in the delivery, preparation, and consumption of food that technology is now fueling.

Join the conversation tomorrow evening at Grocery A-Go-Go. Register now.


Sponsored posts are content that has been produced by a company that is either paying for the post or has a business relationship with VentureBeat, and they’re always clearly marked. The content of news stories produced by our editorial team is never influenced by advertisers or sponsors in any way. For more information, contact [email protected].


Pantry’s fresh food kiosks represent a food industry undergoing massive change

image1


This sponsored post is produced in association with Panasonic Lab 1.0. 


You know the feeling: that mid-afternoon slump when M&Ms, or salted chips and a soda, will revive flagging energy so you can finish that report or get through the next meeting. Even though the pick-me-up will soon send your blood sugar crashing, it’s what’s on offer at the vending machine downstairs.

Alex Yancher to the rescue. Recognizing a groaning (as in empty stomach) need to make healthy food accessible when people want it, the culinary superhero has transformed traditional vending machines into healthy food on the go. Both a hardware and software solution, Pantry enables the unattended retail of fresh food via digitally operated kiosks, the next generation of vending machines.

Putting their money where the mouths are

Last month, the three-year old startup obtained another $1 million in seed financing, bringing its total funding since inception to 2.3 million.

There’s good reason — vending is ubiquitous. With five million US vending machines in operation, it’s rare to enter a hotel, hospital, or office building that doesn’t boast at least one. Since Pantry’s goal is to democratize access to fresh, healthy food, vending seemed a natural approach.

“The vending ecosystem does not work for fresh food,” explains Pantry co-founder Yancher. “Vending operators aren’t food producers, which means they have to order food from a third-party distributor. By the time your sandwich leaves the production facility, gets on a truck, gets placed into a warehouse, and gets to the machine, it’s been somewhere on the road for at least five days — which means it’s loaded with preservatives. And that’s the kind of food people are shying away from now. So we knew we had to rethink the entire industry.”


Join Pantry’s Alex Yancher along with food author Eve Turow and Feastly’s Noah Karesh for Grocery-a-Go-Go – a spirited live discussion about the ways grocery innovation is changing our relationship with food. Part of Panasonic’s Lab 1.0, the event takes place Thursday, November 12th from 6 to 8 p.m. in San Francisco. Register now to secure your spot.


Because typical vending operators are unfamiliar with fresh food delivery systems, Pantry opted to work exclusively with food service companies or branded local producers like Mixt Greens, or the food service companies that operate cafés at workplaces such as Stanford Hospital or Cisco Systems.

“We work directly with onsite cafés at a hospital or university or corporate campus, enabling them to keep selling their fresh food 24/7, spread across the campus. One example is Cisco Systems. Their café closes at 1:30. So if you’re hungry at 2 pm, before Pantry, you would be relegated to chips, candy, and soda from the vending machines.

“With Pantry, you still have access to the entire grab ‘n’ go set of options that you normally would if the café was open — and you have this access around the clock. You can get a fresh sandwich at 3 am. Moreover, there are so many of our kiosks on their spread-out campus that you don’t even have to walk all the way to the cafeteria to get that juice or sandwich; it’s right there in the building where you’re already working. Our mission is to shorten the distance between the food, consumer, and kitchen.”

Soda Fail: Junk food is so last millennium

What does Pantry innovation say about shifting food attitudes and expectations, from both the consumer and company standpoint?

“We’re becoming more discerning eaters,” says Yancher. “Consumers are really focused on fresh and healthy — and they’re willing to pay for it. People also want local cuisine. They want to know that the food they’re eating is sourced ethically and responsibly. And the food service industry and restaurant industry is catering to that.

“Companies are also starting to realize that providing fresh food and snacks is a necessary perk. Just the way free coffee is a no-brainer for offices to provide for employees, subsidized or even free food is becoming the norm as well.”

He illustrates: “Stanford Hospital used to have a vending machine in the hallway that sold preservative-laden triangle sandwiches as well as hot pockets. They opted to replace that machine with a Pantry. Sales from the original vending machine were approximately $500/month, which is actually pretty good for a vending machine. When we installed a Pantry kiosk, the very first month sales hit $3500 — a seven-fold increase.” That was their first appointment at Stanford; since then they’ve added several more units. The numbers tell the story: people are hungry for what Pantry provides.

SKU’d toward possibility

While Pantry doesn’t yet work with any grocery suppliers, there are plans to bring grocery staples directly to residential buildings. “We want to make the top-selling SKUs readily available to people at all times via our unattended kiosk in, say, the lobby of a condo complex or large apartment building,” explains Yancher.

Could tired residents coming home from work utilize a kiosk for dinner? Potentially. “We have an idea to retail meal kits with pre-cut veggies and pieces of meat for cooking, similar to the Blue Apron concept. Another approach is stocking the top-selling SKUs, which account for the majority of sales. Instead of having to get in your car and drive to Whole Foods to buy these staples, they’ll be available downstairs in the Pantry.”

Clearly, technology and the start-up community are radically reimagining the way food is acquired and consumed — and will continue to do so.

“I read about a guy who spent six months and $1,500 to make a sandwich from scratch. This was extreme, but I do think of the food space in terms of a value creation spectrum. Let’s say at the far left is what this guy did: grow your own vegetables and raise your own chicken or turkey. At the far right is a fully-prepared meal like you’d eat at a restaurant. Then there’s everything in the middle. You have Blue Apron, which will send you all the ingredients to prepare specific meals. You have Munchery, which will deliver ready-made refrigerated meals that you can heat up. I think in the next two to five years the sweet spots along this value chain will start to get flushed out: what’s more compelling, a ready-to-eat hot meal, or a set of ingredients for you to make at home? The jury’s still out, but some of these will prove to be niche, while others will go mainstream.”

Yancher also sees a growing popularity in kitchen technologies that will help to promote the blossoming in-home prep ecosystem, like Sous-vide devices such as Mellow or Nomiku. “Everybody can become a sous-chef at home with these cool devices.”

It’s part of unstoppable change in the delivery, preparation, and consumption of food that technology is now fueling.

Join the conversation tomorrow evening at Grocery A-Go-Go. Register now.


Sponsored posts are content that has been produced by a company that is either paying for the post or has a business relationship with VentureBeat, and they’re always clearly marked. The content of news stories produced by our editorial team is never influenced by advertisers or sponsors in any way. For more information, contact [email protected].


Segment launches new mobile platform to let marketers test app services faster

apps


Popular web and mobile data integration hub Segment hit the refresh button on its mobile platform today, opening it up to dozens of new mobile engagement and mobile data partners.

The news for mobile publishers and marketers? You can now try more stuff faster.

samsung_galaxy_s6_lg_g4That means that if you’ve always wanted to try mobile marketing automation in your app, for instance, you can now integrate it in about two seconds, with a single line of code. And you can try one vendor this month and another the following month — with almost zero organizational, development, or time overhead.

“We have a pretty significantly growing userbase of mobile customers,” Reinhardt told me yesterday. “They want access to more tools … to try lots of different things, and figure out which tool is best.”

How does it work?


From VentureBeat

Personalization gets you in the door. Mobile personalization gets you in their hearts. Find out more in this free interactive web event.

Segment calls itself a data integration hub, and is somewhat reminiscent of web-based tag management platforms. Its technology allows web and mobile developers to integrate with Segment once and then try any number of third-party marketing and data tools almost instantly, simply by flipping a switch. Because Segment sees everything that happens on your site or your app, it can then flow the data appropriately for tools that do analytics, marketing, engagement, testing, attribution, communication, or just about anything else you might want.

Integration for publishers becomes easy and quick … which means that mobile tool vendors better look sharp.

GALAXY S6 edge+_Single_Lockup copy“We prioritize evaluating new vendors that are on Segment,” Conrad Chu, CTO and Co-founder of food delivery service Munchery, said in a statement. “We’re routing all of our data through Segment, so it doesn’t make much sense to allocate engineers to manually integrate tools outside of the system when we could just flip a switch to try a new integration out.”

The old version of Segment’s mobile platform was dependent on Segment engineers to integrate new app services. That created a bottleneck, Director of Marketing Dana Smith said — dozens of integration requests went undone each month — so the company has now opened up the platform and enabled mobile enabling vendors to do the tool-Segment integration themselves.

“This will allow Segment to scale the number of services much faster,” she added. “It has been constrained by Segment engineers, but enabling partners to do this themselves … will make it much faster.”

Speed is important, and not just for marketers doing integrations — Segment needs to add more partners faster to compete. The company currently processes more than 50 billion API calls every month. That’s impressive, but a large portion of those are on the web, not on mobile. Not only is mobile where competitors such as mParticle focus exclusively, but mobile is where the majority of innovation is happening today.

That makes this new platform launch critical to Segment’s plan to dominate mobile as much as it dominates on the web.

“We get dozens of integration requests each month,” Reinhardt told me, adding that the company now has about 160 integrations, including 75 on mobile. “I’d expect those mobile numbers to probably double or triple within a year.”

iPhone 6s pinkOne advantage for Segment, of course, is that having a foot in both web and mobile camps makes Segment more omnichannel-friendly. That’s key, argues Smith, saying that even mobile-first companies are moving to have a web presence.

This could make Segment a go-to resource for mobile publishers looking to integrate mobile app analytics, mobile marketing automation, mobile testing, attribution, deep-linking, and and communication tools into their apps. After all, speed and ease of integration is critical for mobile marketers and publishers.

“One of the major barriers for effective measurement and collaboration has always been the number and complexity of SDK solutions,” says Tune CEO Peter Hamilton. “We are eager to support solutions like Segment that empower developers to easily use the products they need.”

That’s even more true when you consider that companies with substantial web and mobile presences don’t currently have an easy way to view combined impression, visit, duration, and user data between their websites and mobile apps. With Segment’s new platform, any vendor who supports both Segment on the web and Segment on mobile — analytics vendors, I’m looking at you — could enable that kind of functionality.

It’s also something that could help mobile app publishers in bigger ways than ease of integration and speed of deployment.

One of the big reasons why high-end web-focused tag management solution such as Ensighten exist is that too much of marketers’ data is siloed. On the web, that could mean chat logs are in one place, web analytics in another, e-commerce sales charts in a third, website improvement surveys in a fourth, and so one. A tag management solution can help marketers bring all their data into one combined place, sortable and viewable by users and cohorts, and discover deeper truths with more contextualized and comprehensive datasets.

I wonder if something similar might make sense in mobile.

Mobile marketing automation systems come close, but often don’t tie deeply and immediately into m-commerce sales records, or other sets of data about customers. Enabling a holistic view of users from all the mobile tools that app developers and marketers use open up fruitful new ways of understanding users — and customers.

Day one launch partners include Kochava, the attribution vendor, Appboy and Kahuna, the mobile marketing automation systems, and Tune, which does both attribution and mobile engagement. Deep-linking leader Branch is also an initial launch partner.

More information:

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Google and Intel partner with Tag Heuer on $1,500 Android Wear smartwatch

TAGHeuerConnectedGroup


155-year-old Swiss watch maker Tag Heuer today unveiled the “Connected Watch,” a $1500 smartwatch built in partnership with Google and Intel. It’s made of titanium and runs Android Wear.

Tag Heuer CEO Jean-Claude Biver:

We want to be connected to tomorrow. How could we get connected to tomorrow in our Watch Valley? In theWatch Valley, as the name says, we are producing watches. But we are producing mechanical watches. But we are producing traditional watches … watches that people love.

But can we do in watch valley a connected watch that people want? No. So what did we do? We tried to do it, and we went to Silicon Valley. So today if there is something to be said, today is the marriage of Watch Valley and Silicon Valley. It’s a marriage between America and Switzerland…

So this wedding, what does it mean? It means for TAG it’s a milestone for our brand. But it’s also a milestone for the Swiss watch industry. The Swiss watch industry has entered today, thanks to Intel, Google.. the Swiss Watch industry is connected to the future. That is the importance of the event today. That is why I’m excited. That is why I am proud to be here.

Not the first ‘luxury’ smartwatch

TAG Heuer isn’t breaking ground today. Apple already retails a handful of luxury Apple Watch models priced as high as $17,000 and LG sells a $1,200 gold smartwatch called the “Urbane Luxe.” Actually, TAG Heuer isn’t even the first Swiss-made smartwatch. Mondaine technically beat it to the punch. And it doesn’t appear to be the first Intel-powered Android Wear smartwatch, either. Fossil did that in October.


Google and Intel partner with Tag Heuer on $1,500 Android Wear smartwatch

TAGHeuerConnectedGroup


155-year-old Swiss watch maker Tag Heuer today unveiled the “Connected Watch,” a $1500 smartwatch built in partnership with Google and Intel. It’s made of titanium and runs Android Wear.

Tag Heuer CEO Jean-Claude Biver:

We want to be connected to tomorrow. How could we get connected to tomorrow in our Watch Valley? In theWatch Valley, as the name says, we are producing watches. But we are producing mechanical watches. But we are producing traditional watches … watches that people love.

But can we do in watch valley a connected watch that people want? No. So what did we do? We tried to do it, and we went to Silicon Valley. So today if there is something to be said, today is the marriage of Watch Valley and Silicon Valley. It’s a marriage between America and Switzerland…

So this wedding, what does it mean? It means for TAG it’s a milestone for our brand. But it’s also a milestone for the Swiss watch industry. The Swiss watch industry has entered today, thanks to Intel, Google.. the Swiss Watch industry is connected to the future. That is the importance of the event today. That is why I’m excited. That is why I am proud to be here.

Not the first ‘luxury’ smartwatch

TAG Heuer isn’t breaking ground today. Apple already retails a handful of luxury Apple Watch models priced as high as $17,000 and LG sells a $1,200 gold smartwatch called the “Urbane Luxe.” Actually, TAG Heuer isn’t even the first Swiss-made smartwatch. Mondaine technically beat it to the punch. And it doesn’t appear to be the first Intel-powered Android Wear smartwatch, either. Fossil did that in October.


Democratizing secure payments: How startups and entrepreneurs can offer customers ironclad payment security

texting3


This sponsored post is produced in association with Braintree.


There are several options for enabling secure mobile payments on your website or native app, but the technology is complex and the regulatory requirements for doing so are daunting, so you’ll want to do a little homework to find the solution that’s right for you.

To determine the best fit for your needs, keep in mind the fundamental goals of providing security and ease of use, for both you and your customers.

The core concept to keeping customer data safe is simple: Raw credit card data should never be touching a merchant’s servers. So, in order to make web and mobile payments work, the strongest payment solutions use something called tokenization. What’s that mean?

Let’s say you’re Uber, and your customer wants to store their credit card info in your app so they don’t have to enter it anew every time they want to use it. Once they enter that card information, it gets encrypted, then sent to a cloud somewhere for safe storage.

When your customer needs to use their card data to pay for their Uber ride, it’s accessed via that secure cloud, and the transaction gets handled under the auspices of something called the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), which provides a multitude of checks and balances to ensure online transactions are handled safely and securely.

You wouldn’t do your own accounting, would you?

Now, if you’re Uber, you’re running a car service, that’s what you do. You don’t want to take on the risk of trying to live up to every requirement of PCI because a) it’s a beast, and b) dealing with all the regulatory stuff would be distracting for your business. So, in the same way that you might outsource your tax accounting or legal work, you’ll rely on organizations that specialize in providing PCI-compliant payment solutions to manage those transactions for you.

Companies like Braintree that have the highest level of PCI certification available are experts at advanced data encryption (think: multiple data encryption keys stored on many different servers). So even if a data thief were to try and get their hands on your customer’s card data, they really couldn’t do anything with it without all the keys.

“When a consumer is making a payment inside an Uber app, those payment credentials are tokenized and essentially scrambled and federated to Braintree’s vault in the cloud,” explains Aunkur Arya, GM of mobile at Braintree. “The merchant is not having to increase their PCI scope to deal with such sensitive information.”

In practical terms then, tokenization refers to how technology makes it easier for merchants to securely process payments and protect consumers. In fact, despite all the regulatory and technical complexity, getting a PCI-compliant payments solution in place for your business is actually pretty easy these days, thanks in large part to the introduction of some clever new tools such as hosted fields.

To understand what hosted fields are, picture a typical online payments form. In it, there are a number of places where your customer will enter various order information, such as their name, address and, of course, their credit card data. Those fields that hold card data are particularly sensitive. Hosted fields refers to a deceptively simple technology that allows the payment processor to host those sensitive fields on their secure servers, meaning your customer’s card data is never exposed to potential data thieves.

A simple solution for even a company of one

With hosted fields, your website or mobile app simply pulls in the hosted fields to your payments form with a line or two of code, and the security and PCI compliance is baked right in. There are even options out there to pull in entire payment forms with the same high level of security measures and encryption.

In this way, you can enable web and mobile payments that leverage easy, off-the-shelf solutions — on web or mobile — and feel confident that they’re secure.

Certainly, there’s more to consider when scoping out mobile payment solutions — at minimum, you’ll want to think about your potential needs around contextual commerce and the ability to scale payment acceptance globally.

But ensuring PCI compliance and ease of use are the main things to keep in mind for businesses and brands that want to offer customers convenient and secure web and mobile payment options.


Sponsored posts are content that has been produced by a company that is either paying for the post or has a business relationship with VentureBeat, and they’re always clearly marked. The content of news stories produced by our editorial team is never influenced by advertisers or sponsors in any way. For more information, contact [email protected].


Facebook sees more than 8B video views daily from 500M users

A Suggested Video, now in testing by Facebook


Facebook is certainly growing its video capability in an effort that could eventually rival YouTube. On the company’s Q3 2015 earnings call, Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg disclosed that more than 8 billion video views take place daily on the social network from 500 million users. This is a 100 percent growth rate since April when Facebook said there were 4 billion video views.

In the past quarter, Facebook has been working to enhance its core product to ensure that video would have the support users needed. It debuted a livestream option through its Mentions app, added support for interactive 360 degree videos, and more. And getting users trained on feeling accustomed to watching videos on Facebook can set things up for when Oculus Rift begins selling its consumer headset and virtual reality videos are published on the social network.

Already people are drawing comparisons between Facebook and YouTube, mostly spurred by the different enhancements the company is making, including a dedicated video feed, support for more videos within Instagram (a la Twitter Moments), and a desire to go after premium advertisers with large TV budgets. Assuming that the measurements are similar, in 2012, Google disclosed that YouTube had 4 billion video views a day.


From VentureBeat

How do you get consumers to connect with and engage with your brand flawlessly? This free and interactive web event arms you with the tools you’ll need to get ahead.

When it comes to longer-form content, could we be seeing the equivalent of YouTube creators but for Facebook soon? Zuckerberg says that probably not because the more natural starting point for the social network is around shorter-form content. What people are looking for in their News Feed are smaller clips, not necessarily full-length TV shows. He states that the company is already seeing folks like Jimmy Fallon break up their show into clips that can be consumed within 3 to 7 minutes right within the News Feed.

Zuckerberg believes that the current market of consuming shorter form clips is a massive one and Facebook is far from mastering the space. In fact, he hopes that what traditional media and content producers will do is “chunk up their stuff to make sure that it’s more easily consumed by this large community online.”

Granted that there is some questions about what is considered a “view”, because if you just watch for a few seconds — is that a view? Or do you complete the entire video, is that a view?

When it comes to video discovery, Zuckerberg remarked that the company has a clear roadmap over the next few years to “add more dimensions to the video experience on Facebook.” An example would be finding ways to show users videos from Pages that they’ve liked or follow. “We’re still so early on this,” he said.

More information:

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Google Search now indexes iOS 9 apps with deep links, Safari will show app content by end of the month

New Google Logo: 2015


In May, Google began allowing iOS developers to implement App Indexing so signed-in users can open content surfaced from mobile apps directly in Google Search (via the main Google app and via Chrome, or even installing iOS apps if they don’t have them). These indexed links were made available to “a small group of test partners initially,” and now the company is expanding that by making the feature compatible with HTTP deep link standards for iOS 9. Google expects iOS users will start seeing app content in Safari by the end of October.

This means developers can now get app content into the search results page on Safari for iOS by adding universal links to their iOS 9 app, and then integrating with Google’s SDK. Because this is now much simpler, Google is dropping app indexing support on iOS 7 and iOS 8.

In short, the Google app for iOS, Chrome for iPhone and iPad, and Safari for iOS now support Google’s app indexing. You can find new iOS apps by searching for things like “word games” and install them directly from the results page, or find in-app content directly in the search results (as you can see below, searching for “cascal” will show you the bar on Yelp).

google_search_ios_deep_linking

Google has been experimenting with various levels of app indexing for years, with features showing up as early as December 2013. The majority were focused on Android, but this year Google has been expanding the functionality to iOS.

On Android, nothing is changing today. Developers can still get their apps into search results, autocompletions, and Marshmallow’s Now on Tap by adding HTTP deep links and integrating with the App Indexing API.

With both Android and iOS, Google Search is indexing content from the two biggest mobile app platforms. This is the company’s strategy to bring the web and mobile closer together: promote apps for developers, offer users content only available in apps, and gather data about where and how users are accessing information.

More information:

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