Cannes Lions: Advertising and marketing execs slowly learning to love their new tech overlords

Google's beach cabana at Cannes Lions. Suck it, Mountain View.
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CANNES, France — Standing on the second floor balcony of the Marriott hotel where Pinterest was holding a networking event, Bob Gilbreath, an Old Fashioned cocktail in hand, could gaze at the beach across the street and marvel at tech’s total dominance of the worlds of advertising and marketing.

It was the start of the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, one of the most import events on the ad world’s calendar. The private beaches that line the water in Cannes had been rented by one big tech name after another: Salesforce, Google, Facebook.

Gilbreath was here as cofounder of Ahalogy, a new-breed digital marketing firm with 45 employees that focuses exclusively on Pinterest. But he can still remember coming to Cannes Lions a few years earlier when, as a product manager for Procter & Gamble, he noted a handful of executives from Facebook.

“It was a real novelty at the time,” he said. “Now, adtech has taken over.”

Indeed it has. New platforms, Big Data, and the growth in mobile and cloud computing are forcing big changes on the advertising and marketing industries. The rise of new digital startups and influential giants like Google and Facebook could be seen and felt across every inch of Cannes Lions.

Having discovered Cannes Lions, Silicon Valley has swooped in like a conquering army, transforming every corner of this massive conference and assimilating any person or thing that stands in its way.

Tech’s victory has not converted all doubters. Along with discussions about targeting and personalization, the weeklong conference included many discussions about whether technology was killing creativity, with some even arguing the rush into the digital had gone too far, too fast.

Still, the anxiety caused a few years ago by the arrival of tech in Cannes has gradually given way to acceptance, and in many cases excitement about the new opportunities.

Greg Grimmer is chief operating officer of Fetch, an agency that launched in 2009 to focus on mobile. It counts Uber and Supercell among its clients. Grimmer said the global ambition of many startups has created a new dynamic for advertisers who can help them get their messages heard around the world.

“These companies are far more ambitious,” he said. “And they want to move fast.”

Cannes <3 Adtech

Facebook on the beach at Cannes Lions. Suck it, Menlo Park.

Above: Facebook on the beach at Cannes Lions. Suck it, Menlo Park.

Image Credit: VentureBeat/Cannes Lions

Cannes Lions can seem like one massive, freewheeling party along the French Riviera. And, well, that’s because it is.

Outside the conference center, companies rent the yachts that line the harbor to host their guests. They invite celebs like Sting and Kim Kardashian to stop by for the glamour factor. Or they sponsor them to appear on stage, like Pharrell Williams, to impart words of wisdom about what it means to be creative.

But behind the scenes, Cannes Lions is also where a massive amount of business still gets done. Partnership deals are signed. Executives spend most of their time in hotel rooms hashing out deals. The parties and speaking slots at the main conference are designed to dazzle clients.

The pressure, along with the partying, is intense. Companies spend months preparing for Cannes Lions. Everyone knows to some degree that if they have a bad week here, it could affect their entire year. And everyone has a tale to tell about a friend of a friend who lost their job after a bad Cannes Lions.

Tech giants understand the stakes, and they made their presence felt at every turn.

Facebook unveiled a new, immersive mobile ad product it was developing. Microsoft gave an hour-long demo of the HoloLens on the main stage. Twitter talked about viral versus cyclical trends, and how data could help advertisers find the value in both. Tinder hosted an official after-hours networking event. Box was sponsoring the press room.

And for the first time this year, Cannes organizers tacked on a two-day event devoted solely to the topic of innovation.

Amid this high-tech saturation bombing campaign, Snapchat still managed to stand out as the main attraction.

Founder Evan Spiegel snagged a high-profile keynote slot, and the theater was packed for his appearance. Just before Cannes Lions, Snapchat had announced a new video ad product. And the next day, the company made a splash by announcing Truffle Pig, a social content shop for large brands launched in partnership with ad giant WPP and the U.K.’s Daily Mail.

The press conference was held on the Daily Mail yacht.

Cannes fears Adtech

Somewhere back in Oakland, many Pandora employees are hard at work.

Above: Somewhere back in Oakland, many Pandora employees are hard at work.

Image Credit: VentureBeat/Chris O'Brien

While the march of technology across advertising now feels inevitable, that doesn’t mean that everyone is ready to bow down.

Sitting on a beach stage one morning, just a short hop from the water’s edge, The Economist hosted several executives to discuss the shifting landscape. Gannon Jones, head of brand marketing for MillerCoors LLC, insisted that creativity still mattered and issued a bit of a warning about the obsession with tech.

“I think technology is starting to get in the way of creative,” he said. “It’s causing us as marketers to fixate on the technology and the capabilities. We have so much data and so much information, more than we actually need.”

Sitting next to him, Michael Wege, senior vice president and chief growth and marketing officer for Hershey, echoed that sentiment.

“You can get enamored by the platforms and you can get enamored by the data,” he said. “But if you don’t have a great idea, it won’t matter.”

Yet a third panelist, Laurent Faracci, senior vice president for global marketing and digital excellence at RB, was happy to wave tech’s flag.

He said the ability to track, personalize and target messages had helped numerous clients improve brand recognition. What’s more, he said that there’s no getting around the fact that more and more media consumption is happening on mobile gadgets, a platform many marketers still don’t understand.

Marketers and advertisers need to embrace tech to understand this new world, he said.

“That is very complex for agencies, and it’s very complex for us,” he said. “But it’s also an opportunity. In the broadcast world, you had one message for everyone. Now, technology can advance and boost that message.”

Making peace

The Periscope team was in Cannes with a real Periscope that you could use with your smartphone to Periscope. Get it?

Above: The Periscope team was in Cannes with a real Periscope that you could use with your smartphone to Periscope. Get it?

Image Credit: VentureBeat/Chris O'Brien

The tech industry was certainly sensitive to these lingering fears about creativity. And throughout the week, there were attempts to ease the anxiety by trying to reconcile that tension.

Perhaps, techies argued, tech was not killing creativity, but creating new and imaginative forms of expression and storytelling.

At a session called “Scientists vs. Poets: The Art of Connecting Data to Storytelling,” two colleagues from DigitasLBi planned to discuss, according to the program, how “in today’s hyper-connected world, the best marketing comes when you embrace the creative tension between left-brain and right-brain. Powerful storytelling will always be the best way to motivate people’s behavior, but data and analytics can help brands get under the skin of that behavior.”

Maybe the Internet of Things would be a conduit for new messages and stories. Tim Berners-Lee appeared on stage to discuss how artificial intelligence could revolutionize the way people communicate and discover new things.

That richer, more immersive world lies just over the horizon. And when we reach it, tech companies insisted, the worlds of digital and creativity will both thrive.

“What is really exciting right now is the idea that we are moving from taking a webpage and putting it on phone to getting into a kind of experience where you can look underneath that and find something that’s fuller, three-dimensional and encouraging you to use your finger and your ears to explore,” said Chris Cox, Facebook’s chief product officer, during his keynote talk. “We’re entering a new era of creativity.”


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Mark Zuckerberg’s vision of the future is full of artificial intelligence, telepathy, and virtual reality

z
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Mark Zuckerberg made some mind-bending predictions about the future at a Q&A he hosted on his Facebook page on Tuesday.

They may seem far-fetched now but some of the Facebook CEO’s ideas are shared by futurists and scientists alike.

Scientists at Facebook and elsewhere are working toward a future where artificial intelligence (AI), telepathy, and virtual reality are commonplace. In fact, some of that technology is already here.

In the future, Zuckerberg hopes we’ll be able to:

Send your thoughts to another person

Almost all the technology being built today focuses on creating rich commnication experiences, Zuckerberg said. As that technology improves, he foresees us bypassing smartphones and computers altogether, and speaking to each other using the power of our minds

“One day, I believe we’ll be able to send full rich thoughts to each other directly using technology,” he said. “You’ll just be able to think of something and your friends will immediately be able to experience it too if you’d like. This would be the ultimate communication technology.”

Zuckerberg isn’t alone in asserting that telepathy will soon be commonplace. Ray Kurzweil, computer scientist and futurist who’s made some outrageous predictions of his own, believes that we’ll soon be able to connect our minds to the cloud, and communicate with the internet and others through the use of tiny DNA robots.

Today, scientists are working on technology that sends simple yes and no messages using skull caps that have external sensors and receivers. A person wearing one cap can nod their head or blink, which would be translated to a yes or no question, and sent via a magnetic coil affixed to the second person’s head.

Have a computer describe images to you.

Zuckerberg posted a video of Yann LeCunn, director of Facebook’s AI research, two weeks ago that revealed some of Zuckerberg’s ideas about AI. LeCunn expounds on his work in computer vision, a subfield of AI that focuses on improving how computers perceive visual data like images and videos.

This AI tech already exists, LeCunn said, in ATM machines to the facial recognition systems that allows Facebook users to tag friends in photos. Zuckerberg believes this work will eventually culminate into a computer that can view an image or a video and describe it in plain English.

He believes it’s a technology that will be widely available in the near future, but the beginnings of it are available right now in computer science labs across the world.

“We’re building systems that can recognize everything that’s in an image or a video,” Zuckerberg said. “This includes people, objects, scenes, etc. These systems need to understand the context of the images and videos as well as whatever is in them.”

Use lasers to beam the internet from the sky

Making the internet, and more specifically Facebook, accessible to as many people on the globe remains one of Zuckerberg’s primary concerns. Facebook has developed laser communications system that are attached to drones and essentially beam the internet down from the sky.

“As part of our Internet.org efforts, we’re working on ways to use drones and satellites to connect the billion people who don’t live in range of existing wireless networks,” he said. “Our Connectivity Lab is developing a laser communications system that can beam data from the sky into communities. This will dramatically increase the speed of sending data over long distances.”

Facebook lasers

According to Popular Science, Facebook has already rounded up test flights of the drone, which “reportedly have a larger wingspan than a Boeing 737 – 102 or 138 feet.”

Be immune to diseases

In a rare encounter between a social media mogul and a physicist, Stephen Hawking asked Zuckerberg, “I would like to know a unified theory of gravity and the other forces. Which of the big questions in science would you like to know the answer to and why?”

Zuckerberg’s response centered on his fascination with people and his hopes for medical advances that will essentially turn us all into Supermen.

“I’m most interested in questions about people,” he said. “What will enable us to live forever? How do we cure all diseases? How does the brain work? How does learning work and how we can empower humans to learn a million times more?”

Once again, AI comes into the fray. Watson, the IBM machine that famously defeated world chess champion Garry Kasporov in 1996 and world Jeopardy champion Ken Jennings in 2011 is back — better than ever and this time in hospitals. Watson is assisting doctors at MD Anderson hospital with developing treatment plans for leukemia patients.

It’s an industry that many AI scientists believe is ripe for change, and one where AI can make a real difference.

“I’m convinced that machine learning and deep learning are going to have a profound impact on how medical science is going to be in the future,” Yoshua Bengio, AI scientist at the Universite de Montreal told Business Insider. “The natural machine learning thing to do is to consider millions and millions of people, and measure their symptoms and…connect the dots. Then be able to say ‘given all the information we have for that particular person, their medical history, that’s the best treatment.’ That’s called personalized treatment.”

Live in a virtual reality world.

Asked about how the world will look from a technology and social media perspective, Zuckerberg answered, “We’re working on VR because I think it’s the next major computing and communication platform after phones…I think we’ll also have glasses on our faces that can help us out throughout the day and give us the ability to share our experiences with those we love in completely immersive and new ways that aren’t possible today.”

Zuckerberg has a stake in making virtual reality a feasible device for every day users. Facebook purchased Oculus in 2014 for $2 billion, and it’ll soon be available for consumers next year.

This story originally appeared on Business Insider.

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Media firms are excelling at social: Reach grows by 236%

social-media-reach

Getting any engagement from social media is a tough game, with only 1 percent of messages having any kind of real impact.

But, according to a new study released by SocialFlow, media and entertainment companies are doing better than ever with their social media marketing.

The study — which takes its findings from over eight million organic posts — shows that the average reach per post for media companies publishing to Facebook increased 67 percent from March 2014 through March 2015.

“It’s clear that media companies are producing more, and better, content than most marketers,” Jim Anderson, CEO at SocialFlow, told me. “Just look at your own News Feed and you will probably see that.”

In that same period, total reach for media companies grew by 236 percent, and SocialFlow saw a jump in engagement too. Across the year, average engagement per post on Facebook for media companies was up 44 percent.

socialflow-media-entertainment-socialMedia and entertainment companies, it seems, are not only embracing Facebook, they are excelling at it.

“The top-performing 10 percent of posts on social media drive about 80 percent of the total reach,” Anderson said. “And nine out of 10 of those top-performing posts come from media and entertainment companies.”

Media companies that use Twitter saw a more moderate increase in engagement over the year — just 3 percent — but that is in the face of a much higher volume of tweets from media publishers: up 98 percent on last year. Increased engagement of any kind in a space that has twice as much noise is still an impressive gain.

But there could be more to those findings that meets the eye.

“Good content deserves to be seen again,” Anderson said. “Too much content is competing for a fixed amount of consumer attention, and the reality is that most people don’t see your posts the first time.”

How are companies dealing with this issue? Content recycling.


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While publishing similar tweets at various times per day is a fairly common practice, SocialFlow’s study details the results of recycling posts on Facebook, and the results are interesting.

Content that is posted twice gains 1.7 times the reach and 1.5 times the engagement than a single post. And posting the same content three times increases that to 2.1 times reach and 1.7 times engagement respectively.

socialflow-facebook-post-recycling

“Television networks learned many decades ago the value of reruns,” Anderson said. “Savvy social media managers are starting to embrace the recycling of content as well.”

But the report errs on the side of caution.

Recycling posts can be seen as “spammy,” and marketers need to be aware of the effect that a poor reuse strategy can have on Facebook’s EdgeRank algorithm — the “secret sauce” that determines whether your content will be seen in people’s feeds or not.

“Facebook’s EdgeRank doesn’t punish recycled posts, it punishes bad posts,” Anderson said. “You can double your reach by taking a high-quality post and publishing it three times.”

The study — the second in SocialFlow’s series on Organic Publishing to Social Networks — is available now.

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Attention, YouTube: Facebook offers first video ad split

A Suggested Video, now in testing by Facebook

Facebook is trying to make video makers and advertisers happier — and make YouTube take notice.

But at least one analyst says that the current emphasis on how long a video ad plays is missing the evolution of the mobile video ad.

Today, the social network giant said it will offer a 55 percent revenue cut to video makers for ads that are shown before or during videos in its Suggested Videos test — the first time Facebook will share video revenue.

The videos are ones that are displayed in the Suggested Videos section of Newsfeed, currently in testing on some users’ iPhones.

Tapping on a video in News Feed brings up additional video suggestions below the first video, related to the same topic or from the same publisher. The videos play as the user scrolls. So, a funny short video about a kids’ baseball team, which was suggested and played along with several Major League Baseball clips, will split 55 percent of revenue with the other clips, depending on how long each one played.

But, during the test, Facebook said it will take no revenue from this revenue split, and none will be paid to media partners. Only the non-partner content makers will receive money.

VP of partnerships Dan Rose today told re/code that a lot of the company’s media partners “have said this will be a big motivation to start publishing a lot more video content to Facebook.”

“That’s exactly what we’re hoping for.”


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Interestingly, this split is the same offered by YouTube, whose dominance of the online video environment is clearly in Facebook’s sights.

Yesterday, Facebook made video advertisers a bit happier. It announced they had the option of paying for videos only if the video has been viewed for at least ten seconds. Otherwise, the advertiser is charged as soon as the video ad starts playing — even though the user may have already clicked a link to go somewhere else.

Facebook spokesperson Elisabeth Diana told me that the company’s definition is that, if it autoplays on the page, it is viewable. This requires half of video pixels to be in view. She also confirmed that, given the longer viewing requirement, there will be a premium charge determined through the ad auctions.

“YouTube has offered a similar viewing time guarantee on their video ads for years now,” Forrester vice president Nate Elliot pointed out to me via email.

He noted that, given the premium, this may “not be as clear a win for advertisers as it first appears.”’

“YouTube’s guarantee, by contrast, is much more compelling. To quote the company’s site: ‘You pay if they watch for at least 30 seconds or to the end of the video (whichever is less).’ ”

And all of this is just an “interim happy medium between publishers and advertisers,” Jennifer Wise, also a Forrester analyst, told me in an email. “But [it] won’t set the long-term standard.”

The center of user computing activity is, of course, mobile, and she noted that “mobile video ads are in transition.”

“Mobile advertisers have truncated their ads to 15-seconds for mobile, but that’s too long,” she said, advising that mobile advertisers should be prepared for video ads in the single digits of seconds. These are being driven by YouTube’s allowance of a skip on a video ad after seconds, she said, and by the ability to “pass through [native] ads as quickly as content.”

“Video ads on mobile aren’t TV commercials,” Wise noted, adding that they are evolving their own form “with short content clips as teasers of information [or] options to opt-in to see more instead of auto-playing the whole message.”

“What they lose in time they will make-up for in interactive features — being [complemented] with text and rich-media overlays to leave an impression on the consumer not using audio or flying by the ad.” This will continue to move metrics away from “viewability,” she predicted.

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Mark Zuckerberg explains why Facebook is investing in artificial intelligence and virtual reality

Facebook cofounder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg during a town hall question-and-answer session on May 14.

Facebook cofounder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg today fielded questions from users of the major social network, and one of them, Jenni Moore of Ireland, asked him about his “view on the world” in 10 years’ time. He took the question as an opportunity to talk about some of the biggest initiatives the company will working on. One of those initiatives is artificial intelligence research.

Here’s how Zuckerberg put that effort in context in today’s online question-and-answer session:

Second, we’re working on AI because we think more intelligent services will be much more useful for you to use. For example, if we had computers that could understand the meaning of the posts in News Feed and show you more things you’re interested in, that would be pretty amazing. Similarly, if we could build computers that could understand what’s in an image and could tell a blind person who otherwise couldn’t see that image, that would be pretty amazing as well. This is all within our reach and I hope we can deliver it in the next 10 years.

Research and development has been a high priority for Facebook as of late, and the company has been hiring more and more researchers to work on AI. At the helm of the Facebook Artificial Intelligence Research unit is Yann LeCun, a luminary in a trendy type of AI known as deep learning. He and his colleagues are rapidly developing technologies to analyze videos, answer questions, identify objects and people in images, and even generate image samples. And the team is continually bringing on new talent, too.

Other major tech companies, like Google and Microsoft, have also been doing more with deep learning in the past few years as well. But Facebook is moving especially quickly to become an AI powerhouse.

The two other major initiatives he called out were virtual reality and Internet.org. Here’s how he couched those:

First, we’re working on spreading internet access around the world through Internet.org. This is the most basic tool people need to get the benefits of the internet — jobs, education, communication, etc. Today, almost 2/3 of the world has no internet access. In the next 10 years, Internet.org has the potential to help connect hundreds of millions or billions of people who do not have access to the internet today.

As a side point, research has found that for every 10 people who gain access to the internet, about 1 person is raised out of poverty. So if we can connect the 4 billion people in the world who are unconnected, we can potentially raise 400 million people out of poverty. That’s perhaps one of the greatest things we can do in the world.

Third, we’re working on VR because I think it’s the next major computing and communication platform after phones. In the future we’ll probably still carry phones in our pockets, but I think we’ll also have glasses on our faces that can help us out throughout the day and give us the ability to share our experiences with those we love in completely immersive and new ways that aren’t possible today.

Read Zuckerberg’s other interesting answers to user questions here.


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Facebook tweaks News Feed again to serve up videos you’ll actually watch

Facebook's News Feed on iOS.
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Facebook is tweaking its News Feed to serve you videos you’re more inclined to watch.

In its latest update, the company will now consider a wider range of user behavior to try to guess what you want to see. Rather than just looking at what users like, share, and comment on, Facebook will now also take into account the subject matter of videos that users broadly interact with.

“We have learned that certain actions people take on a video, such as choosing to turn on sound or making the video full screen, are good signs they wanted to see that video, even if they didn’t want to like it,” the company wrote in a blogpost.

Now if a user turns the sound on for a video in their News Feed, expands it to full screen, or watches it in HD, Facebook will take that to mean the user liked the video. However, that may not be the most accurate representation of the kinds of videos a person wants to be served. For instance, I may watch a clickbait exposé on the realness of Kylie Jenner’s lips, but that doesn’t mean I want videos of the Kardashian family flooding my feed. Just because a video may pique someone’s interest initially doesn’t mean it will either hold their interest or be indicative of the content they actually like.

Facebook is focusing more and more attention on video content. Last year, the company updated its video ranking system to prioritize videos with better user engagement statistics. Today’s update is an expansion of that.

Facebook says it will be rolling out the update starting today.

 

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Facebook for Android still lets you send messages without installing the Messenger app

Facebook Messages
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Facebook made an interesting announcement earlier this week, as it opened its Messenger app to those who would rather not log-in with their Facebook credentials.

The move came more than a year after the social network giant started notifying users that they would no longer be able to message friends from within the main Facebook app, thus forcing them to install and use the standalone Facebook Messenger. Or use the mobile Web version instead.

While use of the Facebook Messenger app may have soared, many have continued to grumble about the need to have two apps on their phone to use the full Facebook feature-set. However, if you’re an Android user, there’s a little quirk that lets you read and send messages from within the main Facebook app.

First up, you’ll need to ensure the Facebook Messenger app is uninstalled from your phone or tablet. Now, if you try accessing messages from within the main Facebook app, you’ll probably be greeted with a message like the one on the left below. But if there isn’t enough space on your device to install the Facebook Messenger app, you’ll see an error message like this on the right.

Messenger: Install & Error Message

Above: Messenger: Install & Error Message

Based on my tests, a typical Android device requires around 500 MB to download, unpack, and install Facebook Messenger. So if you have less than that, then this little quirk should work for you. Also, this workaround doesn’t apply on iOS.

If you’ve managed to bring the remaining storage on your device below the threshold, you may have to close and relaunch the app, or even reboot your phone. But you should now be able to access the full messaging functionality from within the main Facebook app. You will still see a little button at the bottom asking you to install Messenger, but that’s it.

Facebook Messages

Above: Facebook Messages

Granted, this won’t be a convenient workaround for many people given the restrictive conditions under which it works — if you want to avoid installing the Messenger app, you might be better off using the mobile Web version of Facebook. However, if you’re one to always work close to the storage limits of your device, then it’s a useful trick to know nonetheless.

We’ve reached out to Facebook to ask about the process outlined above, but have yet to hear back.


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Dutch court: Facebook must turn over user data in sex video case

Facebook Franco Bouly
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(Reuters) – Facebook must turn over any information it possesses that could help a young woman find out who published a sex video of her without her consent, a Dutch court ruled on Thursday.

The Amsterdam District Court said in its ruling that if the U.S. company cannot comply because it has erased the relevant data — as it argues — it must allow an external expert access to its servers to verify that.

Facebook had argued that the user who posted the video had done so from a fake account and said it had erased all information relating to the post from its servers, along with the video itself, in February.

“The offending account was ultimately deleted before we received any request for user data, so all information about it was removed from our servers in accordance with our terms and applicable law,” Facebook said in a statement emailed to Reuters.

“We deeply empathize with the victim’s experience and share her desire to keep this kind of nonconsensual imagery off of Facebook,” it said.

The woman who sued Facebook has appeared on Dutch television identifying herself as Chantal, 21. She described the suffering and humiliation she has undergone since the video was posted.

The video, in which the woman is recognizable, was made by a former boyfriend when they were both minors. He denies any involvement in the posting of the video online.

Although it was removed from Facebook within an hour of being posted, the video was downloaded and then further circulated on the Internet.

“Facebook has a legal obligation to provide the information because the unknown person acted illegally and the information cannot be obtained elsewhere,” a court-issued summary of Thursday’s decision said.

“If Facebook continues to maintain that all data that could lead to a person are definitively deleted from its servers and no longer traceable, that should be confirmed by an independent researcher,” the ruling said.

Facebook, which is the world’s largest social media network, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

(Reporting by Toby Sterling and Anthony Deutsch; Editing by Larry King)


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Facebook is no more diverse than it was a year ago

Facebook cofounder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg during a town hall question-and-answer session on May 14.
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It’s been a year since Facebook published its first diversity report, and not much has changed.

Today Facebook released its latest set of diversity stats.

Though the company vowed to build a more diverse Facebook, that hasn’t happened yet. The company is now 68 percent men, down one percent from last year; and 55 percent white, down two percent from last year. The rest of the stats show similarly slow progress. For instance, Facebook grew the number of Asian people it employs by two percent; however, it failed to attract people of other racial backgrounds.

The number of women it employees in non-tech positions also grew. Women now occupy more than half of non-tech jobs at the social network. For some that marks anti-progress. Many organizations are trying to build more opportunities for women in engineering and programming rather than marketing and sales.

Women in tech positions at Facebook increased a dismal one percent, and the number of women in management positions hasn’t budged since last year.

The report is all promises for the future. Facebook says it’s instituted something akin to the NFL’s Rooney Rule, which requires that minorities are represented in each batch of qualified applicants for a new job. It’s also bulking up its Facebook University summer program, which takes kids from underrepresented backgrounds and pairs them with mentors within the company. Facebook has also allegedly overhauled its “Managing Bias” training course to be help its staffers be more aware of their unconscious biases.

While Facebook may be making all kinds of appeals for a more diverse future, the proof is in the numbers — and for now, Facebook doesn’t have them.

Check out the stats below:

Facebook diversity diversity_2015_high-10

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