Archive for the 'Facebook' Category



Quartely earnings push Facebook share prices to an all-time high

Thursday 24 July 2014 @ 2:18 pm
Quartely earnings push Facebook share prices to an all-time high

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It looks like yesterday’s quarterly earnings report all but erased any ill feelings about Facebook’s mood experiment — the stock reached an all-time high today.

Facebook’s share price hit a record high of $76.90 per share today, after closing at $71.29 per share yesterday.

The boost comes just after Facebook released its quarter two earnings. A thrust in mobile advertising revenue helped push overall revenue and profit above analyst expectations. During the second quarter earnings meeting, Facebook announced that its mobile advertising revenue had shot up 151 percent this quarter, accounting for well over half of all advertising revenue.

Facebook’s midday stock price of $76.31 drives the company’s valuation up to nearly $200 billion, priming Facebook to rival IBM, which holds No. 4 spot in terms of top publicly listed companies, says Reuters.

But before you run off to buy shares of Facebook, the Federal Reserve warned just last week that social media stocks may be overvalued. The statement caused their prices to dip slightly.

It’s not like investors don’t know this. Though Facebook’s IPO in 2012 was awaited with sweaty palms, there was some ambivalence about how well in would fair down the round. Facebook’s stock has definitely been on the up, though that hasn’t been without pitfalls. As Reuters notes, the stock fell “for months” after its initial launch. Part of the possible trepidation about Facebook had to do with the company’s capability to develop a consistent revenue stream.

The company has also suffered some rebuke for its policies on user data as well as its mood manipulation experiment, which was done without user consent.

What yesterday’s earnings showed is that Facebook may have found a reliable way to monetize with mobile advertising.

“I mean look this is a company that a little bit more than a year ago they had no mobile ad business at all,” says Scott Kessler at S&P Capital IQ. Mobile revenue now accounts for 62 percent of all advertising revenue for the company — that’s a pretty big jump in a small amount of time. “It’s pretty impressive, especially when you look at the other large cap companies in the same size range,” Kessler says.

In the last quarter Apple saw a 6 percent increase in revenue, while Google saw 20 percent growth in revenue. With a roughly 60 percent rise in revenue, Facebook is well ahead of the pack.

“They figured out how to effectively monetize through mobile advertising. A lot of companies are still struggling there, and they’ve cracked the code,” says Kessler.

Not only that, but Facebook is thinking ahead with its acquisition of Liverail for growing mobile video ads.

“I think for a long time television was for creative storytelling and online ads were for targeted text-based results, but were’ seeing that change,” COO Sheryl Sandberg said on yesterday’s earnings call. If mobile really is the future of video advertising, investors really do have a reason to be excited.


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Facebook’s mobile ad revenue is leading ad growth

Wednesday 23 July 2014 @ 3:45 pm
Facebook’s mobile ad revenue is leading ad growth
Image Credit: Facebook

Facebook says it’s a mobile-first company, and its earnings are boosting this claim.

Facebook announced its quarterly earnings today, with revenue for the second quarter totaling $2.91 billion, a year-over-year increase of 59 percent. And mobile advertising led the way, providing 62 percent of Facebook’s $2.68 billion advertising revenue. But Facebook isn’t just increasing its mobile-ad power — it’s also branching out with app install adds, its mobile ad network, and its acquisition of Liverail. And it intends to keep growing that revenue for next quarter with an increasing focus on mobile.

The company noted in its quarterly earnings call that desktop use of Facebook continues to decline while mobile usage ramps up.

“People on Facbeook use it 40 minutes everyday and one to five minutes on mobile. Overall people engage nine hours a day on digital media, which leaves a lot of room for growth” says CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

One of the places that Facebook is looking to grow is video. Earlier this year, the company acquired Liverail, a video advertising platform that enables publishers to monetize their videos through live bidding.

“People think mobile app install ads are a majority of our mobile advertising and they’re not,” says COO Sheryl Sandberg. She sees mobile advertising for Facebook as much broader, comprising of in-feed ads coming from a variety of publishers and ad developers. She also sees it focusing on what she terms as “storytelling,” much like television advertising has for decades.

“I think for a long time television was for creative storytelling and online ads were for targeted text based results, but were’ seeing that change,” says Sandberg. Part of the trick going forward will be making the ads feel like they’re part of Facebook’s user content, a seamlessly string of stories — not product pushing.

The company is also toying with autoplay, having videos automatically start when users stop scrolling in their news feed.

Mobile advertising totaled $9.69 billion in the U.S. in 2013 and will increase 83 percent to reach $17.73 billion this year, according to eMarketer. Though Facebook is growing, Google is still on top: It took 41.5 percent of all net U.S. mobile ad revenues in 2013.

 

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Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 10.53.56 AMOur upcoming GrowthBeat event — August 5-6 in San Francisco — is exploring the data, apps, and science of successful marketing. Get the scoop here, and grab your tickets before they're gone!  


Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »











Social shopping experiments continue on Facebook and Twitter. But why?

Sunday 20 July 2014 @ 8:15 am
Social shopping experiments continue on Facebook and Twitter. But why?
Image Credit: Shutterstock

Despite limited success so far, Facebook and Twitter are continuing their efforts to get you to buy stuff while you’re using their services.

According to reports late last week, Facebook is experimenting with adding a “Buy” button to status updates from selected brands. For instance, Sephora could post an update about a new color of eye shadow, and instead of making customers go to the Sephora.com website to complete the purchase, they could buy it simply by clicking the button right in the Facebook post — using a credit card kept on file with Facebook’s servers.

It’s not the first time Facebook has experimented with social shopping — nor is Facebook the only social network trying this.

Facebook Gifts was a short-lived attempt to let people buy actual, physical gifts and send them to friends within Facebook. It started in August, 2012 with the acquisition of gift-giving startup Karma, but Facebook shut down Gifts in August, 2013.

Similarly, Facebook Credits were an attempt to incorporate e-commerce into Facebook via a virtual currency. Facebook Credits were used mostly to purchase virtual goods within Facebook games, and for a time Facebook required all game developers on its platform to use Credits for in-game purchases. But after pushing them hard in 2010 and 2011, the company discontinued Facebook Credits in 2012.

Twitter, too, has been experimenting with in-stream purchases. The latest experiment, a partnership with Amazon.com, lets people add items to their Amazon shopping carts by tweeting with the hashtag #AmazonCart. That’s convenient, and a search for the hashtag #AmazonCart shows that some people are really using it. But the number using it must be minuscule compared to Amazon’s overall sales volume — and the hashtag hasn’t cracked the “trending” hashtags yet either. Sure, it’s an experiment. But it’s also likely to appeal only to a small number of purchasers, who don’t mind tweeting what it is they are thinking of buying.

These companies, it’s clear, would like social commerce to become a thing. But it’s not clear that customers really want this.

Are you making purchases on Facebook or Twitter? Let us know in the comments below!


Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 10.53.56 AMOur upcoming GrowthBeat event — August 5-6 in San Francisco — is exploring the data, apps, and science of successful marketing. Get the scoop here, and grab your tickets before they're gone!  


Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »

Twitter is a real-time information network that connects you to the latest information about what you find interesting. Simply find the public streams you find most compelling and follow the conversations. At the heart of Twitter ar... read more »











Coming soon to Facebook: Video ads that follow you from device to device

Friday 18 July 2014 @ 2:04 pm
Coming soon to Facebook: Video ads that follow you from device to device

Advertisers on Facebook see the emerging method of sequential mobile advertising as a way to better control their branding message with consumers on social media.

Sequential video advertising allows marketers to place targeted video ads in front of a user when they click an ad on their mobile device. Based on what the person clicks, and what the product or message is, marketers are then able to follow up with similar video ads as they hop from one device to another.

By creating a sequence of targeted ads, marketers can build up a pitch from one video to the next — starting with a “pitch” video and ending with a “sell” video intended to close the sale.

VentureBeat spoke to two sources who requested their names not be used because the information they were describing was based in conversations with Facebook executives.

“Video is where its going,” an advertising executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat. “With unique profile IDs, you have the ability to better sequentially target content for users as they embark on their journey through the social media funnel.”

The same executive added: “Sequential video advertisers gives marketers the ability to place different messages that can build upon each other. This gives you greater control over the delivery of your message.”

Another mobile executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat that advertisers want to better control, and deploy, product messages. But they are content, for now, in permitting Facebook and others obtain user data to target their ads.

For its part, Facebook uses a combination of its own in-house analytics and partners for the task of ad targeting.

Facebook is able to amass tremendous amounts of user data based on information contained in in its users’ profiles as well as their activity. That includes information on who you interact with and where you like to shop, for example. That data is gold to advertisers, keen to take advantage of Facebook’s 1.2 billion users.

“The writing is on the wall. Sequentially targeted ads are hugely efficient and ultimately cost effective. They have greater relevance for advertisers and better targeting,” said the second source, who has knowledge of Facebook’s mobile ad strategy.

“Anecdotally, it’s very promising. Facebook is putting a lot of effort into it,” the same source added.

Indeed, Facebook bought the video advertising outfit Liverail for an undisclosed sum earlier this month. Liverail’s technology optimizes video ad deliveries for mobile devices utilizing bidding and proprietary data. Liverail was considering an IPO this year but threw in its lot with Facebook instead, media reports said.

A Facebook spokesperson declined to comment on the Liverail deal because it hasn’t closed yet. The spokesperson told VentureBeat that the social media giant began incorporating video ads into user feeds years ago but that in March, the company unveiled Premium Video for advertisers.

Video ads are an important component of Facebook’s market strategy. You can see a blog post on the subject here.

The two mobile executives said Premium Video Ads was a definite upgrade to earlier iterations of mobile video ads and that the company was focused on evolving their mobile ad technology with better tools for advertisers. And they both pointed to discussions with Facebook executives that the company is tweaking and testing new forms of mobile ad deployments likely to be unveiled by years end.

A blog post announcing Premium Video Ads put it this way:

“Premium Video Ads are designed for advertisers who want to reach a large audience with high-quality sight, sound and motion. Each 15-second video ad will start playing without sound as it appears on screen and stop if people scroll past. If people tap the video, it will expand into a full-screen view and sound will start. People can expect to begin seeing these new ads over the next few months.”

Facebook’s analytics and targeting capabilities are second to none, the sources both said. The sources told VentureBeat that the exceptionally detailed information on Facebook’s 1.2 billion users is ripe for the unveiling of upgraded targeted and video ads that possess many factors of consumers, including where they live, shop, and eat.

“It’s all in the context. Facebook knows more about you than Google does. They know who you’re friends and family are, and what kind of hair gel you use. They’re saying ‘we have more information on you and we know everything,” the second source said.

Facebook VP of ad product marketing Brian Boland hinted at the future of video ads in a blog post July 2 heralding the Liverail purchase:

“We believe that LiveRail, Facebook and the premium publishers it serves have an opportunity to make video ads better and more relevant for the hundreds of millions of people who watch digital video every month. More relevant ads will be more interesting and engaging to people watching online video, and more effective for marketers too. Publishers will benefit as well because more relevant ads will help them make the most out of every opportunity they have to show an ad.”

“Sequential content delivery in ads sends a top-level message to consumers that brands know who they are. The reach and frequency of video ads allows Facebook the ability to reach out to users more effectively. Video is very powerful, and Facebook is committed to that pipeline of direct response,” the first source told VentureBeat.

At Facebook’s F8 conference in April, the company unveiled Audience Network, its enhanced advertising platform, furthering cementing the social media kingpin’s belief that mobile video ads are another important way to increase their share of the mobile ad pie.

Facebook has made solid strides into its mobile ad strategy over the last year alone. A study by TGB Digital showed Facebook’s ad click-through rate is four times higher than arch-rival Twitter’s, with 1.1 percent compared to Twitter’s 0.266 mobile CTR.

And at the F8 conference, Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg declared that his company had become a mobile-first player.

 

 

 


Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 10.53.56 AMOur upcoming GrowthBeat event — August 5-6 in San Francisco — is exploring the data, apps, and science of successful marketing. Get the scoop here, and grab your tickets before they're gone!  


Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »











Facebook may make its ads shoppable: Meet the ‘Buy’ button

Thursday 17 July 2014 @ 12:00 pm
Facebook may make its ads shoppable: Meet the ‘Buy’ button
Image Credit: Screen shot

Facebook is toying with the idea of becoming a meta-marketplace with a new “Buy” button for purchasing real, physical goods without ever leaving the site.

After experimenting with “Autofill” in the last several months, Facebook is now letting you use those credit cards you keep on file on Facebook to actually purchase stuff without even leaving the site or app, just by clicking a button, according to a TechCrunch report.

Autofill lets Facebook users keep their credit card info on file in their Facebook profiles, then easily populate checkout fields with one click when shopping from merchants with Autofill integration. The idea is to use your Facebook login as your one-click checkout.

“The idea is that if we have your card credentials on file, we can prepopulate your info ahead of a purchase,” said Facebook head of retail and e-commerce Nicolas Franchet during a small press roundtable in March.

“[Right now] you click on the add, you go to Sephora.com you then have to enter your info – eventually you’d want to not have to do that,” he said.

Autofill was created to solve that problem and now the new button is taking it one step further, taking even more steps and friction away. Franchet hinted back then that this is where Autofill was headed as removing as much friction as possible, along with great ad targeting, is every advertiser’s dream.

On the advertier and merchant side, the new button will likely mean higher conversion rates from their ads on Facebook. The idea of a one-click or equally quick shopping experience is something Twitter and Amazon, for example, have also been working on. The two companies recently teamed up to let Amazon customers shop with a simple tweet, and a “Buy Now” button surfaced on Twitter a couple weeks ago, as well.

This could potentially affect ad rates, making them more valuable, although the ability of these special ads converting to sales will also depend on how well targeted they are, something any advertising platform is always working on.

And while Facebook isn’t currently charging the few merchants it’s testing the new button with, it isn’t taking it off the table. Affiliate programs are an old and solid business program, so why wouldn’t Facebook roll that out.

Back in January, Facebook announced that it would be rolling out new advertising options, including a “Shop Now” button, which is likely the first iteration of the new button.


Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 10.53.56 AMOur upcoming GrowthBeat event — August 5-6 in San Francisco — is exploring the data, apps, and science of successful marketing. Get the scoop here, and grab your tickets before they're gone!  


Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN), a Fortune 500 company based in Seattle, opened on the World Wide Web in July 1995 and today offers Earth's Biggest Selection. Amazon.com, Inc. seeks to be Earth's most customer-centric company, where cu... read more »

Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »

Twitter is a real-time information network that connects you to the latest information about what you find interesting. Simply find the public streams you find most compelling and follow the conversations. At the heart of Twitter ar... read more »











Marketing rockstars from Facebook, Walmart, Zappos, & more join GrowthBeat lineup

Tuesday 15 July 2014 @ 12:51 pm
Marketing rockstars from Facebook, Walmart, Zappos, & more join GrowthBeat lineup
Image Credit: Impact Economics

Our upcoming GrowthBeat event — August 5-6 in San Francisco — is exploring the data, apps, and science of successful marketing.

What we’ve traditionally called marketing, the art of convincing people to consider parting with their hard-earned time, attention, or dollars for the sake of you, your product, or your service, is adding a hell of a lot of science.

There’s science in knowing your prospect or customer, learning what he or she does with or around your offering, understanding how your users interact with your product, and endlessly optimizing what you’re doing, how your product works, what messages engage, and how you can be more relevant to your customers’ needs.

That’s growth. That’s marketing tech. And all that data which is pouring in is significant. In fact, it’s the difference between corporate life and death.

That’s why we’re putting on GrowthBeat. NOTE: Tickets are limited. Grab yours today and save $100!

The number of marketing technology companies tripled in 2012 and tripled again in 2013 — it’s a confusing mess of capability and opportunity.

We’re bringing in some of the best and brightest in modern digital marketing to unclutter the landscape, simplify the functions, clarify the goals, and point the way to success.

Today, we’re excited to announce the next round of speakers, including top marketing execs from Salesforce, HootSuite, Facebook, Jiffy Lube, Walmart, Zappos, Oracle, Interscope, and more.

Check out the names below, and make sure to register soon!

GrowthBeat Speakers

We’ll be announcing a bunch of other speaker and program updates in the coming days, so stay tuned. For more on the vision of GrowthBeat, including event themes and takeaways, you can head over to our event site.

Special thanks to the following industry leaders for supporting GrowthBeat: Demandbase as Gold Partner; Ion Interactive as Silver Partner; AT&T, Swrve, Act-On, Personagraph, and Looker as Event Partners; and CommandIQ & Marketing.AI as Nest Partners.











Facebook offers free WiFi to some students who can’t afford it in North Carolina

Tuesday 15 July 2014 @ 9:09 am
Facebook offers free WiFi to some students who can’t afford it in North Carolina
Image Credit: Marco Paköeningrat

Free WiFi for some, thanks to Facebook.

A school system in Forest City, North Carolina offers every middle and high school student a free laptop, but unfortunately “nearly half of those students don’t have access to the Internet at home,” according to school administrators.

That’s when Facebook stepped in with the (local) promotional stunt of the decade.

In this town, which happens to plat host to a key Facebook data center, the social network launched a pilot program to offer some students free WiFi. It’s not clear how many students will receive free WiFi from Facebook, but the company shares that the initiative will expand if early tests prove successful.

According to a post by Facebook data center manager Keven McCammon, “this program is still very early in its development, and we all have a lot of work to do to build out this network and ensure that it performs well for the students who need it. But we are proud to continue our community outreach efforts and work with partners in Forest City to try to ensure that our students can enjoy all the benefits of connectivity.”

This program follows a similar announcement from the FCC, which just approved a $2 billion plan to help connect schools and libraries to the Internet.

Via: TechCrunch.


Our upcoming GrowthBeat event — August 5-6 in San Francisco — is exploring the data, apps, and science of successful marketing. Get the scoop here, and grab your tickets before they're gone!  


Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »











Gillmor Gang: Taming of the Stream

Saturday 12 July 2014 @ 9:00 am
Gillmor Gang Artcard The Gillmor Gang – John Borthwick, Robert Scoble, Kevin Marks, Keith Teare, and Steve Gillmor – examine the gathering storm that is the Uber social network. After years of positioning, acquisition, soaring value payouts, and a winner-take-all sensibility in the tech community, now something different. The data points: Digg Deeper, Soundcloud, Twitter user metrics, and more… Read More



Zuckerberg’s (extremely) optimistic prediction of how the Internet benefits the poor, in 3 quotes

Wednesday 9 July 2014 @ 1:10 pm
Zuckerberg’s (extremely) optimistic prediction of how the Internet benefits the poor, in 3 quotes
Image Credit: Flickr user Kris Krug

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Facebook co-founder and hoodie-enthusiast Mark Zuckerberg has revealed his extremely optimistic prediction for how the Internet will reshape the lives of the Earth’s poorest people in a cheery Wall Street Journal op-ed.

Though it didn’t get nearly as much pickup as Zuckerberg’s previous op-ed on immigration reform for the Washington Post, it is nonetheless informative about how one of the world’s most powerful technologists views his own work.

More influential than the printing press

“There have been moments in history where the invention of new technology has completely rewired the way our society lives and works,” wrote Zuckerberg. “The printing press, radio, television, mobile phones, and the Internet are among these. In the coming decades, we will see the greatest revolution yet, as billions of people connect to the Internet for the first time.”

The printing press is easily one of the most significant inventions of the last 500 years. The explosion in mass literacy gave birth to the French Enlightenment and, eventually, democracy. Prior to the printing press, self-governance was only possible in very small societies; really, it only existed in the rolling hills of ancient Athens, where roughly 5,000 citizens would gather to hear orations.

The switch from oral tradition to written language was the basis for the scientific revolution, as it was never before possible to record and replicate information with the same speed.

Radio had a relatively more muted impact on society; it helped centralize the American government and national culture, since everyone could hear the exact same information simultaneously.

Zuckerberg appears to believe that the Internet will have a more profound impact on society than the printing press — in essence, the scientific revolution and the birth of democracy. It’s quite possible that connected devices will indeed rapidly advance society in ways that are qualitatively different than self-governance and the scientific method.

Google, for instance, is leveraging the vast wealth of the web to power a generation of artificial intelligence. Moreover, the creation of virtual reality could create a world that is, for the first time, free of geographic alliances (and all of their associated rivalries).

Whatever the cause, Zuckerberg predicts (very) big things from the web.

Dramatic reductions in poverty

“A recent study by Deloitte found that expanding Internet access in developing countries would create 140 million jobs and lift 160 million people out of poverty, and that this newfound opportunity would even meaningfully reduce child-mortality rates,” said Zuckerberg. “Across sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia and Latin America, the Internet will help drive human progress.”

There are a number of tech titans who believe that information asymmetry is the cause of poverty. The poor have all sorts of valuable skills and ideas, but can’t connect to investors or buyers, because no one with power can readily access them. Last month, Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky predicted that similar web platforms in the U.S. would alleviate poverty by giving everyone access to part-time paying gigs.

For instance, nonprofit micro-work firm Samasource farms out mostly low-skill digital tasks to some of the poorest places on earth. This reporter has used freelancing platform oDesk to hire people in Asia for research.

Zuckerberg evidently imagines some rather large outflows of cash from developed nations to the developing world, creating financial parity thanks to the Internet.

A connected world

“Perhaps the most important change might be a new global sense of community,” said Zuckerberg. “Today we can only hear the voices and witness the imaginations of one-third of the world’s people. We are all being robbed of the creativity and potential of the two-thirds of the world not yet online. Tomorrow, if we succeed, the Internet will truly represent everyone.”

The idea of so-called “global citizenship” has been around for at least 95 years, around the creation of the League of Nations in 1919. President Obama ushered in a renewed interest in the philosophy, believing that all nations either succeed or fall together. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s tech advisor, Alec Ross, was especially big on this philosophy, helping to promote Internet access and entrepreneurship throughout the globe.

The Internet does make countries more interdependent, as everyday citizens are able to communicate and trade without the nuisance of a government mediator.

One would think that identifying as a “global citizen,” rather than a citizen of the U.S., would have increased with a younger generation that is used to chatting and playing World of Warcraft from those all around the world. But, according to World Values Survey data, young people are not significantly more likely to identify with a global sense of community as older generations.

So, it appears that a global sense of community still needs something a bit more from the Internet, if the Internet can have that effect at all on our beliefs.

Still, these very optimistic predictions help explain why Zuckerberg commits so much of his own money to advancing Internet access in the developing world through programs like Internet.org. He thinks the knowledge economy has a grand mission. It also means he thinks Internet companies deserve a lot of respect and resources, too.


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Report: Samsung and Oculus will launch co-developed ‘Gear VR’ headset at IFA 2014

Tuesday 8 July 2014 @ 8:00 pm
Report: Samsung and Oculus will launch co-developed ‘Gear VR’ headset at IFA 2014
Image Credit: Rich Prugh

How can you leverage mobile to increase profitability for your company? Find out at MobileBeat, VentureBeat's 7th annual event on the future of mobile, on July 8-9 in San Francisco. There are only a few tickets left!

A new report today says Samsung and Oculus VR are definitely working on virtual reality headset, and that the new device will be launched at IFA 2014.

Sam Mobile says the headset will be called the Gear VR and will be announced “alongside the Galaxy Note 4, at IFA 2014.

The partnership between Samsung and Oculus was originally reported in May, but further details have not emerged until today.

The headset won’t be standalone. Rather, it will be a modular design that allows users to connect a Samsung mobile device using a USB 3.0 cable, Sam Mobile believes. And it uses the smartphone’s accelerometer, gyroscope and processing power to track the head motions of the owner of the device.

Oculus VR, which Facebook bought for $2 billion, is making its own headset, the Oculus Rift, while Samsung has separately been working on its technology.

The report says Samsung is developing the hardware of the device, but Samsung is cooperating with Oculus VR, makers of the Oculus Rift VR headset for gaming, to built the software.

Hat tip: Sam Mobile



Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »

Samsung Group is a South Korean multinational conglomerate company headquartered in Samsung Town, Seoul. It comprises numerous subsidiaries and affiliated businesses, most of them united under the Samsung brand, and is the largest Sout... read more »











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