Archive for the 'Facebook' Category



Why I’m clicking ‘Like’ on Facebook ads

Monday 29 September 2014 @ 7:00 pm
Why I’m clicking ‘Like’ on Facebook ads

Generally speaking, I like Facebook ads. They’re surprisingly good at notifying me of useful products I never knew existed, and they help keep the Internet paywall-free.

I recognize that’s not a popular viewpoint. But as Facebook moves to build out its Atlas platform, you’re going to be seeing a lot more Facebook ads, and not just on Facebook’s web site — they’ll follow you around many web sites, just like Google ads do today.

Here’s why I don’t fret.

The anti-ad case

The ad hecklers can best be summed up in a manifesto in the new final social networking site, Ello, which bills itself as an alternative to Facebook. In their short, sweet statement, Ello’s creators proclaim:

Every post you share, every friend you make, and every link you follow is tracked, recorded, and converted into data. Advertisers buy your data so they can show you more ads. You are the product that’s bought and sold.

We believe there is a better way. We believe in audacity. We believe in beauty, simplicity, and transparency. We believe that the people who make things and the people who use them should be in partnership.

Or, as Apple CEO Tim Cook has argued, Apple’s in a better place to protect privacy because it doesn’t regard its users as products to be exploited.

Our business is not based on having information about you. You’re not our product. Our product are these [points to iPhone], and this watch, and Macs, and so forth. And so we run a very different company.

In other words, critics argue, ads necessarily invade netizens’ privacy because they are omnipresent data collectors trying to skillfully manipulate them into buying things they wouldn’t otherwise.

Additionally, tracking people around the web is some nebulous variety of “creepy.”

Not all buying is coercive

Unless you sleep with a stuffed Karl Marx teddy bear at night, we can all agree that the market system of exchanging currency for goods and services is a fine economic strategy.

And in that context, sometimes ads can alert us to things we would love to have, but were completely unaware existed.

At least for me, Facebook has distinguished itself as a website that semi-regularly understands my tastes better than I do. For instance, it knows that as a single guy living in a city that is both the LGBT and tech capital of the world, finding single women is a perpetual game of “Where’s Waldo?”

It also knows that I am a journalist, went to an extremely liberal college, and belong to a group that visited the Holy Land. Thus, it made the not-so-crazy guess that I’m a member of the Tribe and figured I wouldn’t mind meeting a nice Jewish girl.

Hence, in a delightfully prescient ad, it introduced me to Jswipe, Tinder for Jews. I actually really like Jswipe; it’s a whole lot better than having to compete with the hordes of creeps that haunt girls on typical dating sites. Thanks to Facebook, my dating life has improved.

This isn’t the first time Facebook ads have worked for me, either. As a rabid Crossfitter, Facebook also predicted that I’d love Goat Whey protein — one of the few protein supplements that meets the stringent standards of the cultish Paleolithic diet. Facebook was right. The ad made my day. I’ve spent a rather silly amount of time trying to find a good protein supplement, and Facebook handed it to me on a time-saving platter.

Facebook ads aren’t perfect. I don’t like it when it thinks I want to marry a young Russian bride. But, overall, it’s been the best ad system for predicting products that I actually want to use.

So, if I have to choose any ad system that follows me around the net, I’ll take Facebook’s.

Information wants to be free

Apple’s Tim Cook chastised major Internet companies for hoarding customer data and barraging them with ads. Apple, of course, has the luxury of not needing user data, since it sells products to customers and not advertisers. Unfortunately, Apple sells devices that are only affordable to those at upper income levels, and it typifies the income discrimination that goes hand in hand with highly priced products.

The most popular operating system in the world is actually Google’s Android mobile operating system, since most people on earth can only afford cheap phones. Unlike Apple, Google can justify building a free operating system, because its users provide lucrative sources of data to better target ads. I don’t see how it’s possible to give poorer people access to a high-quality Internet experience on the Apple model. The financials just don’t work out.

The Internet was predicated on a radical idea that information wants to be free. But freely-flowing isn’t the same as costing nothing.

But so far, there are only two revenue models that work at scale to support the distribution of quality information: paid and ad-based websites. The smarter advertising becomes, the more of the web can remain free.

It’s a shame that some of journalism’s most venerable organizations, such as Time Magazine, have to use paywalls, thus more or less closing off their content to lower-income individuals. If ads get good enough at targeting, maybe no website will ever have to put a gated entrance.

If we don’t have universally accessible websites, available to all income levels, a large portion of humanity is simply left out of the information revolution.

Because Facebook both introduces me to cool products and helps keep the Internet free, it’s a welcome addition to the information age. It isn’t perfect, but we should be glad it exists and is helping make the Internet better.


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With Atlas, Facebook makes an attempt to dig itself out of No. 2 ad spot

Monday 29 September 2014 @ 4:05 pm
With Atlas, Facebook makes an attempt to dig itself out of No. 2 ad spot

With the official rollout of its new and improved Atlas ad platform, Facebook hopes to become more than an also-ran in the global online ad market.

What’s clear, however, is that Facebook has big challenges ahead. Let’s start with market share: Google has more than 31 percent of the global market for digital advertising, and Facebook is a distant second at 7.8 percent, according to recent figures from research firm eMarketer.

Facebook’s share has been growing, slowly, over the past few years. Atlas is its chance to accelerate that growth — but it has much more work to do if it wants to challenge Google.

That’s the verdict of analysts, mobile executives, and even former Google ad veterans who spoke to VentureBeat on what Facebook’s Atlas portends for the mobile and web advertising sectors. Atlas is a true cross-channel ad platform (delivering ads not just to Facebook.com but also to other websites) that Facebook bought from Microsoft last year for under $100 million and unveiled publicly today.

“Certainly, I believe Facebook’s biggest challenge is convincing enough publishers to work with them to make their network play successful,” Gartner analyst Andrew Frank told VentureBeat.

“They’re great at placing native ads on their own properties, and their mobile reach and engagement are unmatched, but Google is embedded in a large number of apps and sites, and [Google's] DoubleClick currently dominates the ad server space that Facebook would challenge with Atlas,” Frank said.

To be sure, chief executive Mark Zuckerberg declared that Facebook was a mobile-first company earlier this year. The social network has been building its own in-house mobile analytic capabilities to help drive targeted mobile ad campaigns on smartphones and tablets.

With Atlas, however, it shows that Facebook is still interested in desktop.

The mobile ad sector amounted to nearly $18 billion last year, with Google the No. 1 player, followed by Facebook and Twitter. In fact, according to eMarketer, the entire U.S. ad spend amounted to $171 billion last year, a number expected to top $189 billion by year’s end. But clearly, big brands like Coca-Cola and Pepsi are more comfortable now advertising on mobile devices than they were one year ago.

Since the relaunch of Atlas today, mobile operators have announced new advertising initiatives with Facebook. Medialets, for example, announced it would be partnering its media platform with Facebook to help shore up mobile ad management and ROI measurements for the social network’s ad campaigns.

With Atlas, Facebook will be working to leverage lots of highly personalized data from its 1.3 billion users. That information on consumers is highly specific, and it’s exactly the kind of information advertisers want in order to target potential customers in mobile and desktop ad campaigns. But Facebook doesn’t sell this information en masse to third parties. Yet.

“Facebook’s ads business is already a mobile ad business, with 66 percent net revenue from mobile,” said Jesse Hurwitz, formerly Google’s former head of global strategy for mobile ad platforms. He’s now an employee at AdBrain, a mobile ad intelligence platform based in London.

“As a percentage of net revenue they are significantly bigger than Google in mobile.  From an absolute dollar perspective Google is ahead but FB is chasing fast.”

“Google has an ecosystem which makes them very hard to compete against,” Frank said. “Between Android, Play, AdMob, DoubleClick, Bid Manager, AdWords, AdX, etc., they have a formidable presence at almost every stage of the advertising value chain, and they’ve done a masterful job of migrating their broad customer base seamlessly into the mobile world.”

Frank acknowledged that Facebook had done a good job of growing its mobile presence. But, he added, it needs to do more.

“Google still has a broad base of media partners that Facebook will need to pursue with a better angle,” he said.


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Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »











11 TechCrunch Stories You Don’t Want To Miss This Week

Friday 26 September 2014 @ 3:07 pm
tc-weekly-roundup11 From #BendGate and Beats Music to South Park, here are the top stories from 9/20 to 9/26: 1. #BendGate dominated the tech headlines this week. For those unfamiliar with the “saga,” several reports suggested that the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus will bend when left in a pocket for a prolonged period of time. The iPhone 6 Plus in particular garnered the most attention. The iPhone 6 and 6… Read More



Watch out, Google: Facebook getting ready to unveil new mobile ad platform

Thursday 25 September 2014 @ 5:30 am
Watch out, Google: Facebook getting ready to unveil new mobile ad platform
Image Credit: Illustration: Eric Blattberg / VentureBeat

Facebook is apparently moving away from the cookie — and it may announce its plans for a new mobile ad network this Monday at Advertising Week.

There is mass speculation across the virtual ad world that the Menlo Park-based social kingpin will very soon unveil a new, more advanced mobile marketing paradigm in a bid to knock Google, the number-one player in the mobile ad space in terms of pure revenue, off the block. The platform will rely on Facebook’s trove of raw human data with less dependence on cookies for deploying and tracking mobile campaigns. And word on the street is Facebook, number two in mobile ad revenue behind Google, may unveil its new platform this Monday at the ad industry’s annual event, which opens next week in the Big Apple.

“Our gut says that this will be mobile-centric and built on Facebook data using Facebook identification instead of cookies. Where I am super excited [is] the focus on measurement and cross-channel attributions, like being able to track users between desktop and mobile — it’s impossible otherwise,” said David Hirsch, a Google ad veteran who spent eight years at the company.

Hirsch joined Google in 2000 and was a founding member of the company’s advertising team. In fact, he was involved in the creation of the first iteration of Google AdWords. Today, AdWords has emerged as one of the Google’s top revenue generators and has helped push Google itself to the as yet undisputed king of the mobile ad spend. These days, Hirsch runs Metamorphic Ventures in New York.


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There is a lot at stake in the mobile ecosystem — and Facebook recognizes this.

About 500 players currently occupy a space that amounted to over $17 billion last year, a number expected to crest $35 billion by the end of 2014, according to eMarketer. Ad brokers, ad exchanges, retargeters, publishers, and analytic outfits currently operate within it, all vying for a piece of a pie that eMarketer projects will grow nearly 100 percent year-over-year for the foreseeable future. That’s because more Americans are getting comfortable relegating more responsibility to mobile devices like smartphones and tablets.

“They are busy building something behind those doors, and there’s clearly a gag order for the people I met with on the advertising side not to talk about it,” said a mobile executive who works closely with Facebook who requested anonymity.

In order to buttress its mobile offerings, Facebook has acquired 15 companies since 2013, including mobile analytics, back-end, and app companies such as WhatsApp for $19 billion. But numerous people interviewed for this story strongly believe that whatever the new platform turns out to be, it will have some genesis in Facebook’s purchase of Microsoft’s ad server Atlas Solutions, in February 2013, for a sum estimated to be in the region of $100 million.

The reasoning follows that Facebook engineers have been heavily souping up the formerly Windows-centric ad platform, building cross-channel features into it. And whatever Facebook unveils, sources told VentureBeat, it’s likely to include at least some of the remnants of the original Atlas platform.

“If marketers and agencies can get a holistic view of campaign performance, they will be able to do a much better job of making sure the right messages get in front of the right people at the right time,” Brian Boland, Facebook’s director of product marketing, said on a blog post at the time of the Atlas acquisition. “Atlas has built capabilities that allow for this kind of measurement, and enhancing these systems will give marketers a deeper understanding of effectiveness and lead to better digital advertising experiences for consumers.”

Indeed, Valerie Davis, PM Digital’s veep for search media, told VentureBeat in an email that Facebook may actually be relaunching Atlas itself, albeit with tweaks.

“Of course, this is all theoretical as we haven’t seen it live yet, but in my opinion, the relaunch of Atlas will give Google’s DFA [DoubleClick For Advertisers, an ad management service] a run for their money,” Davis said. “Facebook has seemingly managed to solve this device-agnostic ad-targeting obstacle ahead of Google, which will definitely set them apart.”

“However, Google will remain the clear winner in the space until Atlas has a proven record of success,” Davis added.

Facebook has been steadily chipping into Google’s mobile marketing ad dominance since last year. In 2012, Google had 52 percent of the mobile ad market, and the following year, that number decreased to 49 percent. It now stands at about 46 percent. Twitter is also catching up.

At the end of the day, the Facebook workers toiling like Santa’s elves behind closed doors, building, tweaking, and polishing their new mobile-centric platform, will likely to be another game changer, ad veterans told VentureBeat. Despite its weight, Facebook assuredly is still agile enough to surprise even the most jaded technologists.

“We are moving from a world of inferred data and social signals to real human data. Facebook has evolved from a ‘social’ network to a social and communication operating system that seems to be ubiquitous with how people spend their time online,” Hirsch said.

“We have gone from a world of thinking about mobile-to-mobile strategy, to mobile-first, to mobile-agnostic with … iOS and Android, eventually to mobile only.”


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Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »











Oculus VR’s ‘Crescent Bay’ prototype shows why VR still has a long way to go

Tuesday 23 September 2014 @ 10:30 am
Oculus VR’s ‘Crescent Bay’ prototype shows why VR still has a long way to go

Above: GamesBeat writer Giancarlo Valdes tries on the Crescent Bay prototype.

Image Credit: Oculus VR

From here on out, I want all virtual reality demos to use Crescent Bay. I realize that’s completely unfair and unrealistic for developers who are working with older headsets, but the new Oculus Rift prototype comes amazingly close to achieving the kind of VR we’ve read about or seen in countless sci-fi books and movies.

Oculus VR revealed Crescent Bay at last weekend’s Oculus Connect, the first developer conference that the Facebook-owned VR company has hosted. Crescent Bay is lighter and more powerful than the current “DK2″ development kit. Though Oculus won’t sell Crescent Bay headsets (it’s akin to the “Crystal Cove” model from this year’s Consumer Electronics Show), it’s possible that the new features will make it into the next iteration of the Rift or even the eventual consumer release.

“This, for me, really was the thing that changed my view of how big VR can be and how important it’s gonna be,” said Oculus chief executive Brendan Iribe when he addressed everyone in the press room prior to our demo sessions. He added that Crescent Bay is a “very important step” toward the Rift’s consumer version.

I kept those lofty promises in the back of my mind as I headed toward a series of makeshift rooms designed specifically for Crescent Bay’s debut. I love what little time I’ve spent with Rift-compatible games, and I was anxious to try Oculus VR’s latest milestone. What I saw made me both excited and worried about the future of VR technology.

Oculus VR's Crescent Bay prototype

Above: A closer look at Crescent Bay and its built-in headphones.

Image Credit: Oculus VR

A glimpse of freedom

Trying on Crescent Bay was quite different from my other Rift experiences. Instead of sitting in a chair and having someone give me a controller, I was standing on a black foam mat in the middle of a room. Inside was a PC, a camera perched on a wall (it’s similar to the camera from DK2), and an Oculus employee who handled the fragile prototype herself.

The mat had no effect on the new tech. It was there to let people know how much room they had to move around in before accidentally bumping into one of the walls — the rep told me that at least one unfortunate attendee already did that. I quickly understood why. Since Crescent Bay is the first Rift to have 360-degree head tracking, the VR experience felt a lot more like being in the X-Men’s Danger Room. I could look around virtual sets that, aside from a few imperfections (more on that later), completely engulfed the real world. As soon as I put the headset on, the demo started running through a bunch of different scenarios created in Unreal Engine 4 by Oculus’s content team.

Discovering that freedom of movement (and the way it paired with the superb clarity from Crescent Bay’s higher resolution) was my “holy crap!” moment. While the headset limited my movements to a few square feet, it was just enough to wander around and scrutinize objects from different angles. I first realized this when a miniature Sim City-like metropolis popped into view. It was like looking down at a diorama in a toy store. When I bent down to look underneath it, I could see the bottom of the city, which was just a smooth black surface.

SimCity amusement parks

Above: Imagine having something like this floating in the air in front of you.

Image Credit: EA

Another part of the demo transported me to a mysterious planet. An alien with a huge noggin stared at me as spaceships soared above us. The creature didn’t move, and I couldn’t walk past it, but its giant eyes did track me. I had fun creeping closer and closer until I was just inches away from its face. It kept trying to talk to me in its own foreign language.

Even more astonishing was my terrifying encounter with a T-rex. We were in a museum, and the hallway shook as the towering dinosaur charged toward me, stopping just short of squishing me with its foot. When it lowered its head, I crouched to get a better view. The T-rex sniffed at its strange finding and roared in my face. I continued to stay down when it decided to move on, turning my head to follow its massive body and tail as it walked over me and disappeared into the darkness. It was like being in a scene from Jurassic Park.

A segment called Showdown was Crescent Bay’s chaotic finale. I was on a futuristic battlefield where armored soldiers aimed their guns at a giant robot at the end of a street. Everything was moving in slow motion. Bullets and missiles rippled through the air, and a ton of shrapnel and sparks flew right by my head. The demo pulled me toward the robot with an invisible cord, so it kind of felt like I was in the world’s slowest 3D movie.

At one point, someone destroyed a car that was in my way, and I watched the vehicle (and the driver that was still inside) hang in midair as it flipped over from the explosion. The demo ended after the robot took a good look at me with its glowing red eye.

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Established in 1991, Epic Games, Inc. develops cutting-edge games and cross-platform game engine technology. The company is responsible for the bestselling “Unreal” series of games, the blockbuster “Gears of War” franchise and ... read more »

Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »

Oculus VR™ was founded by Palmer Luckey, self-described virtual reality enthusiast and hardware geek. The company launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund development of their first product, the Oculus Rift, a ground-breaking vir... read more »











Facebook launches anti-cyberbullying initiative Down Under

Monday 22 September 2014 @ 2:34 pm
Facebook launches anti-cyberbullying initiative Down Under
Image Credit: Shutterstock

Facebook is getting tough with cyberbullies, who have made many children’s lives a living hell.

The Menlo Park, California-based social media kingpin will begin embedding public safety messages into Australian users’ news feeds in an attempt to get a leg up on cyberbullies. Anti-bullying educational videos will soon begin appearing on Aussie teens’ suggested posts, and similar videos will also be targeted to parents.

Facebook’s efforts dovetail with a $4 million Australian anti-bullying initiative called “Speak Up Against Cyberbullying.” According to reports in the Australian press, Facebook’s head of policy for Australia and New Zealand Mia Garlick said the social media giant has long taken a stand against cyberbullying.

“Facebook has a strong commitment to the safety and well-being of young Australians and has a long-standing relationship with the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development to promote online safety,” Garlick said.

This is not Facebook’s first foray into Australia’s anti-bullying efforts. In 2012, Facebook participated in a similar campaign called Project Rockit, which also featured leading Australian politicians.

And last year, psychologist Marc Brackett from Yale University worked with Facebook to develop what he called an “emotionally intelligent bullying prevention” system. To that end, young teens could report disagreeable posts by clicking on a query screen.

Australia has some of the world’s most stringent cyberbullying laws. These have been created in response to teens committing suicide as a result of being harassed on social media.



Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w... read more »











Facebook Won’t Budge On Letting Drag Queens Keep Their Names

Thursday 18 September 2014 @ 3:31 pm
Screen Shot 2014-09-18 at 4.03.06 PM Facebook will not be changing its real-name policy for the drag queen community. San Francisco drag queens met with representatives from the company yesterday afternoon to talk through a recent mass deletion of their personal profile pages. Facebook started deleting accounts of hundreds of members of the drag community last week after deciding these profiles were in violation of the policy. Read More



Regular Facebook Users Are More Likely To Fall For Phishing Scams

Thursday 18 September 2014 @ 9:20 am
Image (1) phishing.jpg for post 116875 Researchers at SUNY Buffalo have found that habitual Facebook users – meaning users who are on the site more frequently than their peers – were more susceptible to phishing scams. How did they figure this out? By asking them about their habits and then surreptitiously creating a fake friend who then asked them for private information including their student ID number and date of… Read More



Twitter refines its targeted ads in a new update

Wednesday 17 September 2014 @ 10:05 am
Twitter refines its targeted ads in a new update
Image Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/25541021@N00/3819908425/

Twitter is catching up to Facebook’s mobile game.

The company today announced it’s updating its Tailored Audiences feature so that advertisers can create target lists based on mobile numbers and mobile IDs.

The added functionality will allow your favorite brands to take information they’ve amassed about you (in this case your email and phone number) and upload it to a list on Twitter or all the people it wants to send targeted ads to. Then Twitter will give that brand and the other companies vying for your attention an opportunity to bid for a spot in your Twitter stream.

AudienceManager_andListing_blog

“Its’ so hard to get organic reach now because there are so manny people fighting for attention and using all different kind of techniques. The best technique is using data to retarget,” says Dave Hendricks at LiveIntent, a company that develops software to place ads in digital newsletters (full disclosure: VentureBeat uses this platform for its newsletter).

It was once easy for brands to create Twitter and reach their consumers for free with tweets that would appear to their followers. But, as Hendricks said, there are a lot of people on Twitter hoping to grab your attention, so it’s not as easy as it once was to sell products on social media cache alone.

More and more companies are trying to refine targeting capabilities, not just based on the device a consumer is using, but based on specific information a brand has collected about a given consumer on customer relationship management systems. Big data is the way forward for advertising.

Facebook was really the first to endeavor into the mobile ad space with retargeted ads based on email and mobile information when it pushed into mobile a little more than two years ago. Twitter rolled out its Tailored Audience tool last December. This new feature will also includes “look-alike-only targeting,” which will allow advertisers to target consumers that are similar to the ones in their targeted lists.

Of course, Twitter will offer its users an opportunity to not be targeted through privacy settings. But, Hendricks thinks that ultimately there’s no turning back from retargeted advertising. “I believe that CRM retargeting will become more widespread, but I think you’ll see it on television and web display ads. Whether you’re logged into Amazon, or Playstation, I think you’ll see CRM retargeting on all of those channels.”



Twitter is a real-time information network that connects you to the latest information about what you find interesting. Simply find the public streams you find most compelling and follow the conversations. At the heart of Twitter ar... read more »











Here’s what you can earn at the 20 top tech companies

Tuesday 16 September 2014 @ 11:30 pm
Here’s what you can earn at the 20 top tech companies
Image Credit: David Crow/Flickr

While there’s debate over whether there’s a shortage of qualified tech workers, there’s one thing no one argues about: Tech companies pay their employees well.

We’ve heard of senior engineers getting a base salary of $160,000, with stock options and other benefits on top. Some interns are earning $7,000 a month, which amounts to $84,000 a year.

So we sifted through job-hunting site Glassdoor to find the best-paying jobs listed on that site, at the best tech companies, according to Glassdoor’s ranking of the best places to work.

Business Insider logo

We listed the highest-paying job on Glassdoor, plus salaries for two common tech jobs: a senior technical role and a software engineer, at each company, to give you a sense of what those jobs pay as well.


No. 20: Salesforce.com, $319,000

Salesforce.com’s-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an executive vice president at $319,347.

A senior technical staffer gets, on average, $130,233.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $112,942.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 20)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Salesforce.com offers a cloud computing service that helps companies find and support customers.


No. 19: eBay, $320,679

eBay’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a vice president at $320,679.

A senior technical staffer gets paid, on average, $178,080.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $120,424.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 19)

Headquarters: San Jose, California

What it does: eBay is an ecommerce site best known for letting consumers sell stuff through online auctions.


No. 18: Texas Instruments, $156,530

Texas Instruments’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an applications engineering manager at $156,530.

A senior technical staff gets, on average, $125,778.

A software engineer gets, on average, $91,633.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 18)

Headquarters: Dallas, Texas

What it does: Texas Instruments is a semiconductor manufacturer.


No. 17: NetApp, $227,370

NetApp’s top-paying job on Glassdoor is for a director of marketing at $225,494.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $144,756.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $93,726.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 17)

Headquarters: Sunnyvale, California

What it does: NetApp offers enterprise computer-storage products.


No 16: Citrix, $176,322

Citrix’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $176,322.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $108,179.

A software engineer gets, on average, $88,728.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 16)

Headquarters: Fort Lauderdale, Florida

What it does: Citrix makes enterprise software that allows PCs and devices to remotely access corporate apps and data.


No 15: CareerBuilder.com, $131,000

CareerBuilder.com’s-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a director at $131,000.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $84,650.

A software engineer gets, on average, $73,850.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 15)

Headquarters: Chicago, Illinois

What it does: CareerBuilder.com is a website for job seekers and recruiters.


No. 14: Apple, $255,700

Apple’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $255,700.

A software development manager gets, on average, $180,333.

A software engineer gets, on average, $110,867.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 14)

Headquarters: Cupertino, California

What it does: Apple makes the Macintosh PC, iPad tablet, iPhone smartphone, and other consumer tech devices and software.


No. 13: Intel, $231,084

Intel’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software engineering director at $231,084.

A principal engineer gets, on average, $170,146.

A software engineer gets, on average, $97,403.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 13)

Headquarters: Santa Clara, California

What it does: Intel is a semiconductor manufacturer best known for processors that power PCs and servers.


No. 12: Rackspace, $136,229

Rackspace’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software developer V at $136,229.

A manager of software development gets, on average, $125,528.

A software engineer III gets, on average, $82,000.

Employee rating: 3.9 out of 5 (Rank 12)

Headquarters: San Antonio, Texas

What it does: Rackspace offers cloud computing and web-hosting services to enterprises.


No. 11: National Instruments, $122,486

National Instruments’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a Principal Engineer at $122,486.

A senior group manager gets, on average, $112,500.

A software engineer gets, on average, $64,129.

Employee rating: 3.9 out of 5 (Rank 11)

Headquarters: Austin, Texas

What it does: National Instruments makes test equipment for building tech products.


No. 10: Red Hat, $192,333

Red Hat’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $192,333.

A principal software engineer gets, on average, $124,277.

A software engineer gets, on average, $79,725.

Employee rating: 4 out of 5 (Rank 10)

Headquarters: Raleigh, North Carolina

What it does: Red Hat offers open-source software for enterprises, including a popular version of Linux.


No. 9: MathWorks, $137,313

MathWorks’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a principal software engineer at $137,313.

A senior design engineer gets, on average, $117,947.

A software engineer gets, on average, $81,060.

Employee rating: 4 out of 5 (Rank 9)

Headquarters: Natick, Massachusetts

What it does: MathWorks makes computational software for engineers and scientists.


No. 8: Intuit, $216,714

Intuit’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a director of product management at $216,714.

A software engineering director gets, on average, $195,636.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $137,424.

Employee rating: 4.1 out of 5 (Rank 8)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: Intuit makes financial and tax-preparation software for consumers and small businesses.


No. 7: Riverbed, $186,667

Riverbed’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $186,667.

An engineering manager gets, on average, $145,309.

A software engineer gets, on average, $109,464.

Employee rating: 4.1 out of 5 (Rank 7)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Riverbed makes hardware and software that helps enterprise networks run faster.


No. 6: Qualcomm, $222,647

Qualcomm’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director of hardware engineering at $222,647.

A principal systems engineer gets, on average, $183,153.

A software engineer gets, on average, $88,312.

Employee rating: 4.2 out of 5 (Rank 6)

Headquarters: San Diego, California

What it does: Qualcomm is a semiconductor manufacturer best known for its Snapdragon processors that power smartphones and other mobile devices.


No. 5: Google, $281,930

Google’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a marketing director at $281,930.

An engineering director gets, on average, $256,250.

A software engineer gets, on average, $118,968.

Employee rating: 4.3 out of 5 (Rank 5)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: Google operates the world’s largest internet search engine and makes the Android operating system. It makes most of its money from advertising.


No 4: Guidewire, $157,918

Guidewire’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a development manager at $157,918.

A senior solutions architect gets, on average, $136,493.

A software engineer gets, on average, $108,918.

Employee rating: 4.5 out of 5 (Rank 4)

Headquarters: Foster City, California

What it does: Guidewire offers software for the property- and life-insurance industries.


No. 3: Facebook, $191,591

Facebook’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software engineering manager at $191,591.

An IT Manager gets, on average, $163,197.

A software engineer gets, on average, $118,445.

Employee rating: 4.5 out of 5 (Rank 3)

Headquarters: Menlo Park, California

What it does: Facebook is a social network where people can share their thoughts and photos with friends. It makes most of its money through advertising.


No. 2: LinkedIn, $205,980

LinkedIn’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an engineering manager at $205,980.

A senior business systems analyst/business analytics gets, on average, $171,745.

A software engineer gets, on average, $127,557.

Employee rating: 4.6 out of 5 (Rank 2)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: LinkedIn is a social network for professionals. It sells premium subscriptions and job-recruiting services.


No. 1: Twitter, $179,416

Twitter’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a staff engineer at $179,416.

An engineering manager gets, on average, $166,520.

A software engineer gets, on average, $121,642.

Employee rating: 4.6 out of 5 (Rank 1)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Twitter offers a social-media service where people can share their thoughts with the word in 140 characters or less. It generates revenue through advertising.

This story originally appeared on www.businessinsider.com.


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