Archive for the 'Twitter' Category



It’s time for social to grow up

Friday 19 September 2014 @ 9:46 am

GUEST POST

It’s time for social to grow up
Image Credit: Pixabay

For all its apparent financial maturity, social media remains an utterly unique space within marketing, in which spontaneity and a genuine connection to an audience is valued above all else. That rare, natural quality exists because marketers hold an unparalleled amount of freedom within the medium.

But born from that room to operate increasingly comes misguided moments that negatively affect brands on a global scale. Unless the industry as a whole embraces creative as well as fiscal maturity, we’ll be shacked by process and legalese, killing everything that makes social so special.

When DiGiorno Pizza used the #WhyIStayed hashtag to sell pizzas, it inadvertently leveraged a serious conversation on domestic violence for financial gain. It was a mistake that was uniquely social, as was the immediate furor the brand faced globally.

The steps the brand took to remedy the mistake were immediate and refreshing: Instead of the standard boilerplate that has been run through legal thrice over, the individual responsible for the error was human and contrite in how willing they were to be laid bare to the public.

It was this very real moment, a response to a very real mistake that was fundamental in controlling and softening the brunt of those who voiced discontent.

However, DiGiorno is just the latest example of brands’ failure to think before they leap in social — the classic combination of FOMO and riding on the back of a Twitter trend, which unto itself is one of the last bastions of organic, viral social in an increasingly pay-to-play world. Both Delta and KLM didn’t think about the consequences of their tweets in an attempt to cash in on the World Cup. As a result, they were immediately called out, shamed, and forced to apologize to the expectant world stage.

A social media crisis plan was once penned to protect a brand from unexpected outside influences; now it is of our own making.

Real-time marketing is constantly in flux and difficult to gauge in the moment; it takes skill to do, and few can do it well. Brands that stumble when attempting to become part of that wider conversation take the risk of having the resultant negatives far outweigh any gains.

stop-think-social-mediaThese recent faux pas appear to be the new normal for brands participating in social media marketing — collateral damage for remaining at the cutting edge of the ever-changing conversation.

Instead, these gaffes should act as a wake-up call for the industry at large; one in which the value of the social media teams who are directly responsible for how a brand is perceived in the marketplace are finally weighted equally with traditional media — and staffed accordingly.

The community manager’s position on the social totem poll needs reevaluation, lest brands take the path of least resistance and embrace oversight and process to mitigate such very public blunders. The moment that happens, social media loses the social and transforms into yet another cog in the wheel of traditional marketing, wherein malaise and apathy are the rule.

By operating social at arm’s length through the community manager, a plausible deniability is attained, a fall guy assured, and a distance from the community it purports to serve achieved.

Relating to an audience and being seen as a real and natural voice means authentically reacting to and engaging with your audience and the world around you (and apologizing like DiGiorno if you need to). Establishing world-class teams that can gauge the zeitgeist as it is in flux and respond on-brand and appropriately means those apologies need never happen again.

That’s the hard part.


Andy White is Director of Social Business Strategy at Sprout Social, a leading social media management and engagement platform. Follow him @white.


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Twitpic avoids graveyard as mystery buyer steps in

Thursday 18 September 2014 @ 1:50 pm
Twitpic avoids graveyard as mystery buyer steps in

Above: TwitPic


Twitpic made a U-turn on its way to the graveyard.

In tweet posted today, Twitpic said that “we’re happy to announce we’ve been acquired and Twitpic will live on! We will post more details as we can disclose them.”

Twitpic basically died earlier this month after it announced that it was caving to the scary possibility of a bruising trademark court battle with the decidedly bigger Twitter. Twitpic enables users to infuse Tweets with photos.

Indeed, Twitter threatened to cut off Twitpic’s API, which would have decapitated the much smaller San Francsico-based company. In an email to VentureBeat, Twitpic founder and CEO Noah Everett wrote Sept. 25 would be his company’s last day.

“It started a few weeks ago. We hoped they would drop their case against our mark, but they made it clear they would not,” Everett said in an email to me then. “Sorry to not be able to give you anymore details than that, but honestly, that’s all there really is.”

Everett explained his reasons for caving to Twitter’s threats to head to court in a blog post:

“A few weeks ago Twitter contacted our legal demanding that we abandon our trademark application or risk losing access to their API. This came as a shock to us since Twitpic has been around since early 2008, and our trademark application has been in the USPTO since 2009.”

But now Twitpic lives. And, did Twitter buy them out? Waiting to hear back from Everett. Stay tuned.


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Twitter is a real-time information network that connects you to the latest information about what you find interesting. Simply find the public streams you find most compelling and follow the conversations. At the heart of Twitter ar... read more »











Twitter refines its targeted ads in a new update

Wednesday 17 September 2014 @ 10:05 am
Twitter refines its targeted ads in a new update
Image Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/25541021@N00/3819908425/

Twitter is catching up to Facebook’s mobile game.

The company today announced it’s updating its Tailored Audiences feature so that advertisers can create target lists based on mobile numbers and mobile IDs.

The added functionality will allow your favorite brands to take information they’ve amassed about you (in this case your email and phone number) and upload it to a list on Twitter or all the people it wants to send targeted ads to. Then Twitter will give that brand and the other companies vying for your attention an opportunity to bid for a spot in your Twitter stream.

AudienceManager_andListing_blog

“Its’ so hard to get organic reach now because there are so manny people fighting for attention and using all different kind of techniques. The best technique is using data to retarget,” says Dave Hendricks at LiveIntent, a company that develops software to place ads in digital newsletters (full disclosure: VentureBeat uses this platform for its newsletter).

It was once easy for brands to create Twitter and reach their consumers for free with tweets that would appear to their followers. But, as Hendricks said, there are a lot of people on Twitter hoping to grab your attention, so it’s not as easy as it once was to sell products on social media cache alone.

More and more companies are trying to refine targeting capabilities, not just based on the device a consumer is using, but based on specific information a brand has collected about a given consumer on customer relationship management systems. Big data is the way forward for advertising.

Facebook was really the first to endeavor into the mobile ad space with retargeted ads based on email and mobile information when it pushed into mobile a little more than two years ago. Twitter rolled out its Tailored Audience tool last December. This new feature will also includes “look-alike-only targeting,” which will allow advertisers to target consumers that are similar to the ones in their targeted lists.

Of course, Twitter will offer its users an opportunity to not be targeted through privacy settings. But, Hendricks thinks that ultimately there’s no turning back from retargeted advertising. “I believe that CRM retargeting will become more widespread, but I think you’ll see it on television and web display ads. Whether you’re logged into Amazon, or Playstation, I think you’ll see CRM retargeting on all of those channels.”



Twitter is a real-time information network that connects you to the latest information about what you find interesting. Simply find the public streams you find most compelling and follow the conversations. At the heart of Twitter ar... read more »











Here’s what you can earn at the 20 top tech companies

Tuesday 16 September 2014 @ 11:30 pm
Here’s what you can earn at the 20 top tech companies
Image Credit: David Crow/Flickr

While there’s debate over whether there’s a shortage of qualified tech workers, there’s one thing no one argues about: Tech companies pay their employees well.

We’ve heard of senior engineers getting a base salary of $160,000, with stock options and other benefits on top. Some interns are earning $7,000 a month, which amounts to $84,000 a year.

So we sifted through job-hunting site Glassdoor to find the best-paying jobs listed on that site, at the best tech companies, according to Glassdoor’s ranking of the best places to work.

Business Insider logo

We listed the highest-paying job on Glassdoor, plus salaries for two common tech jobs: a senior technical role and a software engineer, at each company, to give you a sense of what those jobs pay as well.


No. 20: Salesforce.com, $319,000

Salesforce.com’s-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an executive vice president at $319,347.

A senior technical staffer gets, on average, $130,233.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $112,942.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 20)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Salesforce.com offers a cloud computing service that helps companies find and support customers.


No. 19: eBay, $320,679

eBay’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a vice president at $320,679.

A senior technical staffer gets paid, on average, $178,080.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $120,424.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 19)

Headquarters: San Jose, California

What it does: eBay is an ecommerce site best known for letting consumers sell stuff through online auctions.


No. 18: Texas Instruments, $156,530

Texas Instruments’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an applications engineering manager at $156,530.

A senior technical staff gets, on average, $125,778.

A software engineer gets, on average, $91,633.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 18)

Headquarters: Dallas, Texas

What it does: Texas Instruments is a semiconductor manufacturer.


No. 17: NetApp, $227,370

NetApp’s top-paying job on Glassdoor is for a director of marketing at $225,494.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $144,756.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $93,726.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 17)

Headquarters: Sunnyvale, California

What it does: NetApp offers enterprise computer-storage products.


No 16: Citrix, $176,322

Citrix’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $176,322.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $108,179.

A software engineer gets, on average, $88,728.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 16)

Headquarters: Fort Lauderdale, Florida

What it does: Citrix makes enterprise software that allows PCs and devices to remotely access corporate apps and data.


No 15: CareerBuilder.com, $131,000

CareerBuilder.com’s-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a director at $131,000.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $84,650.

A software engineer gets, on average, $73,850.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 15)

Headquarters: Chicago, Illinois

What it does: CareerBuilder.com is a website for job seekers and recruiters.


No. 14: Apple, $255,700

Apple’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $255,700.

A software development manager gets, on average, $180,333.

A software engineer gets, on average, $110,867.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 14)

Headquarters: Cupertino, California

What it does: Apple makes the Macintosh PC, iPad tablet, iPhone smartphone, and other consumer tech devices and software.


No. 13: Intel, $231,084

Intel’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software engineering director at $231,084.

A principal engineer gets, on average, $170,146.

A software engineer gets, on average, $97,403.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 13)

Headquarters: Santa Clara, California

What it does: Intel is a semiconductor manufacturer best known for processors that power PCs and servers.


No. 12: Rackspace, $136,229

Rackspace’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software developer V at $136,229.

A manager of software development gets, on average, $125,528.

A software engineer III gets, on average, $82,000.

Employee rating: 3.9 out of 5 (Rank 12)

Headquarters: San Antonio, Texas

What it does: Rackspace offers cloud computing and web-hosting services to enterprises.


No. 11: National Instruments, $122,486

National Instruments’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a Principal Engineer at $122,486.

A senior group manager gets, on average, $112,500.

A software engineer gets, on average, $64,129.

Employee rating: 3.9 out of 5 (Rank 11)

Headquarters: Austin, Texas

What it does: National Instruments makes test equipment for building tech products.


No. 10: Red Hat, $192,333

Red Hat’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $192,333.

A principal software engineer gets, on average, $124,277.

A software engineer gets, on average, $79,725.

Employee rating: 4 out of 5 (Rank 10)

Headquarters: Raleigh, North Carolina

What it does: Red Hat offers open-source software for enterprises, including a popular version of Linux.


No. 9: MathWorks, $137,313

MathWorks’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a principal software engineer at $137,313.

A senior design engineer gets, on average, $117,947.

A software engineer gets, on average, $81,060.

Employee rating: 4 out of 5 (Rank 9)

Headquarters: Natick, Massachusetts

What it does: MathWorks makes computational software for engineers and scientists.


No. 8: Intuit, $216,714

Intuit’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a director of product management at $216,714.

A software engineering director gets, on average, $195,636.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $137,424.

Employee rating: 4.1 out of 5 (Rank 8)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: Intuit makes financial and tax-preparation software for consumers and small businesses.


No. 7: Riverbed, $186,667

Riverbed’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $186,667.

An engineering manager gets, on average, $145,309.

A software engineer gets, on average, $109,464.

Employee rating: 4.1 out of 5 (Rank 7)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Riverbed makes hardware and software that helps enterprise networks run faster.


No. 6: Qualcomm, $222,647

Qualcomm’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director of hardware engineering at $222,647.

A principal systems engineer gets, on average, $183,153.

A software engineer gets, on average, $88,312.

Employee rating: 4.2 out of 5 (Rank 6)

Headquarters: San Diego, California

What it does: Qualcomm is a semiconductor manufacturer best known for its Snapdragon processors that power smartphones and other mobile devices.


No. 5: Google, $281,930

Google’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a marketing director at $281,930.

An engineering director gets, on average, $256,250.

A software engineer gets, on average, $118,968.

Employee rating: 4.3 out of 5 (Rank 5)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: Google operates the world’s largest internet search engine and makes the Android operating system. It makes most of its money from advertising.


No 4: Guidewire, $157,918

Guidewire’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a development manager at $157,918.

A senior solutions architect gets, on average, $136,493.

A software engineer gets, on average, $108,918.

Employee rating: 4.5 out of 5 (Rank 4)

Headquarters: Foster City, California

What it does: Guidewire offers software for the property- and life-insurance industries.


No. 3: Facebook, $191,591

Facebook’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software engineering manager at $191,591.

An IT Manager gets, on average, $163,197.

A software engineer gets, on average, $118,445.

Employee rating: 4.5 out of 5 (Rank 3)

Headquarters: Menlo Park, California

What it does: Facebook is a social network where people can share their thoughts and photos with friends. It makes most of its money through advertising.


No. 2: LinkedIn, $205,980

LinkedIn’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an engineering manager at $205,980.

A senior business systems analyst/business analytics gets, on average, $171,745.

A software engineer gets, on average, $127,557.

Employee rating: 4.6 out of 5 (Rank 2)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: LinkedIn is a social network for professionals. It sells premium subscriptions and job-recruiting services.


No. 1: Twitter, $179,416

Twitter’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a staff engineer at $179,416.

An engineering manager gets, on average, $166,520.

A software engineer gets, on average, $121,642.

Employee rating: 4.6 out of 5 (Rank 1)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Twitter offers a social-media service where people can share their thoughts with the word in 140 characters or less. It generates revenue through advertising.

This story originally appeared on www.businessinsider.com.


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Mobile video ad spend will reach $1.5B by the end of the year (report)

Monday 8 September 2014 @ 5:00 pm
Mobile video ad spend will reach $1.5B by the end of the year (report)
Image Credit: Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock

Mobile video ads could be the final frontier in the nascent mobile advertising space.

U.S. ad firms and marketers will spend about $1.5 billion on mobile video adds by the end of 2014, up from the $722 million spent last year. Mobile video ads accounted for nearly 19 percent of all digital video ad spending last year, a number that will climb to nearly 26 percent by the end of this year, according to eMarketer principal analyst David Hallerman.

“And by the year 2018, the number will quadruple to over $6 billion. This is huge growth,” Hallerman said.

“And let’s look at the big picture,” he added. “Mobile video ads are important.”

emarketer mobile video ad

Incredibly, there are no clear leaders in the space, unlike straight mobile ads, which Google dominates. Facebook is No. 2 in the space, followed by Twitter. The latter two companies posted astronomical growth in the mobile ad space in their second quarter results.

Still, mobile video ads accounted for just 1 percent of all the U.S. ad spend last year, Hallerman said. That total ad spend also includes the old bricks-and-mortar world of print (remember that?), radio, and outdoor advertising.

So why aren’t more advertisers embracing the mobile video ad spectrum?

“The thing that holds mobile video ads back is the frustration of watching video on slow 3G networks,” Hallerman said. “Changes need to made by the Verizons and AT&Ts of the world in order to deal with this.”

To be sure, the mobile ad sector itself is enormous and growing at an astonishing rate. Around 500 players live in the ecosystem, including mobile marketers, ad brokers, exchanges, data-analytics and gaming firms, and others. But not so for the mobile video space.

Analysts said the mobile ad ecosystem was worth more than $17 billion last year. By the end of the 2014, that number is expected to crest to $35 billion. But the mobile video ad space is different, and wide open, which is what makes the space so attractive to those wishing to become serious players.

“There is no one company that rules. Therefore, because it’s not being dominated, it’s very attractive for vendors and ad sellers. There’s no clutter in the space and nobody keeping anybody from the playing field,” Hallerman said.

But without question, Google, Facebook, and Twitter must be listening. And watching. But are they really?


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Twitpic calls it quits rather than battling Twitter in court

Thursday 4 September 2014 @ 5:16 pm

The image hosting site Twitpic is dead. Why? Because of its name.

The company found itself in a trademark dispute with Twitter, which caused the much smaller Twitpic to throw in the towel.

Twitter threatened to cut off Twitpic’s API, which was the service’s sole source of content.

Twitpic founder Noah Everett this way in a blog post:

“A few weeks ago Twitter contacted our legal demanding that we abandon our trademark application or risk losing access to their API. This came as a shock to us since Twitpic has been around since early 2008, and our trademark application has been in the USPTO since 2009.”

“[It] started a few weeks ago, we hoped they would drop their case against our mark, but they made it clear they would not,” Everett said in an email to VentureBeat Thursday.
“Sorry to not be able to give you anymore details than that, but honestly that’s all there really is,” Everett wrote.
Everett said rather than fight a Twitter, which has a market cap of $30 billion and is riding high on strong second quarter earnings, the decision was made to back down. Obviously, Twitter has the money to bleed Twitpic dry in a legal battle over the trademark.

A spokeswoman for Twitter did not return emails for comment.

Over the last three years, Twitter has moved to build-out its suite of photo features and uploading tools, which cut deeply into Twitpic’s bottom line. Still, Everett was more than bummed to see the demise of his Internet economy dream. Everett’s blog post continued:

“On a personal note I (@noaheverett) want to thank you for letting us be a part of your life and helping you share your experiences over the past 6 years, it’s truly been an honor. I have learned so much through running Twitpic over the years. Through the many mistakes I’ve made and lessons learned, to the bad days and the great days. Thank you again everyone…I will miss and cherish the days of Twitpic we had together.”

Twitpic’s last day of operations is September 25. Users will be able, in the meantime, to download all their photos and videos off the site, according to Everett.


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Twitter Taps HackerOne To Launch Its Bug Bounty Program

Wednesday 3 September 2014 @ 9:47 am
Star-Wars-Boba-Fett-Artwork-Wallpaper Following security breaches that have shook confidence in many online services, Twitter today announced the launch of its bug bounty program that will pay security researchers for responsibly reporting threats through HackerOne, a bug bounty program provider. Twitter will pay a minimum of $140 per threat reported on Twitter.com, ads.twitter, mobile Twitter, TweetDeck, apps.twitter, and its… Read More



Twitter starts to tweak its tweet stream, to better compete with Facebook

Monday 1 September 2014 @ 9:30 am
Twitter starts to tweak its tweet stream, to better compete with Facebook

From the addition of video into the newsfeed to sponsored tweets, Twitter has recently been making changes to what its 271 million users see on their stream. Now the social media platform is doing its best to ramp up its advertising revenue — and to tweak what tweets its users see, in order to compete more effectively with Facebook.

By and large, the company’s efforts are working. Last year, Twitter demonstrated how promoted tweets can help to boost offline sales by 29 percent. In July, VentureBeat reported that Twitter had doubled its ad revenue in the previous quarter. And earlier this month, we learned how Twitter’s new video cards are changing how consumers and brands can interact with and embed video content into the Twitter stream.

Beyond these examples, Twitter has also rolled out sponsored profiles, which allow any user to pay to have her profile promoted, as well as  recommended tweets, which can appear in your stream when someone you follow has favorited that particular tweet.

So far, these adjustments to the tweet stream are relatively minor: Adding a few tweets here and there, not filtering the stream as a whole.

This is a markedly different strategy from Facebook, which heavily filters its feed using EdgeRank, an algorithm that determines what is displayed and how high it appears in a user’s newsfeed. By contrast, Twitter’s news feed is almost entirely unfiltered.

But these additions are definitely a change in the way the Twitter newsfeed is presented.

Much of this is experimental, as you might expect. You might get the impression that Twitter is on a path toward deviating from its ever-updating, stream-of-consciousness style stream. In fact, the notion that people can’t mute promoted tweets sounds a lot of alarm bells in the “This is just like Facebook” department.

So how far will Twitter go?

“The thing that makes Twitter unique is its live feed,” says Danny Wong, growth hacker for Shareaholic, the creator of popular social sharing buttons that appear on many websites. He believes that Twitter’s current experiments with how it presents its newsfeed are “doomed to fail.”

“Soon enough, [Twitter] will realize that copying Facebook won’t work because it simply isn’t Facebook.”

Twitter could be seen as scrambling a bit.

“Surely it’s concerned with the fact that it drives less referrals to sites than Facebook,” says Wong, noting that Facebook accounts for 23 percent of Shareaholic’s referrals, while Twitter has just 1 percent, according to a July report.

But Twitter also must be concerned with how overwhelmed people get simply trying to keep up with the ever-moving stream of their feeds.

“Many tweets go unread and aren’t resurfaced the same way Facebook does it,” Wong says.

Twitter & EdgeRank: An “exception to the rule”

Whenever two platforms are going head to head to increase their user bases, there’s usually a rule in play: When one introduces a new feature, the other(s) will follow suit.

“I think the exception to the rule for this is EdgeRank,” says Stacey Miller, keynote speaker and the senior social media community manager for the Vocus Marketing Suite business line. She doesn’t believe Twitter wants to become more like Facebook when it comes to that algorithmic aspect. “Twitter is such a powerful micro-content network. … Filtering news feeds based on an algorithm rather than the preference of viewing the firehose would probably be a turnoff for power users,” she says.

She’s also quick to note that you can easily create lists of people you want to pay particular attention to on Twitter. If you want a narrower focus, you can access that already — you just have to create a list or subscribe to someone else’s list.

“There is so much outrage around the Facebook algorithm, both from consumers as well as brands,” Miller says, “I’m not sure Twitter will take such a risk to filter relevant content.”

Feed filtering algorithms just aren’t very Twitter to start with. It goes against everything Twitter promotes itself to be — your up-to-the-minute view of the world. It’s all about real-time updates and interaction, not algorithmically calculated lists of what the systems thinks you’d be most interested in. No, that’s Facebook’s realm, and most experts across all areas of social media agree that Twitter would be foolish to dip its toes in EdgeRank-like waters.

However, there is some argument in favor of an EdgeRank for Twitter.

“There is a lot of noise on Twitter, and at some point there is going to need to be a way to filter that noise out,” says Tom Spano, former head of global event marketing for Twitter. While he’s certain the company is already working on a system similar to Facebook’s to filter out relevant content, he notes that there are many things users can do right now to filter the noise. “For example, you can choose which languages you want to see your Tweets in, and you can mute or block users to keep them off your feed,” he says.

What’s next for the Twitter newsfeed?

To sum it up? A combination of more of the same and more targeted, custom-tailored content. At least, that’s according to the social media experts we talked with.

Aaron Strout, a digital social strategist, believes that location, via self-reported and geo-tagged tweets, “will play an increasingly greater role in how tweets get targeted and delivered to end users.” People would have the ability to opt-in or opt-out of this feature — but, he says, “the onus [would] be on brands making their content that much more relevant.”

Spano thinks one of the biggest issues with the current Twitter newsfeed is feeling that you always have to be on it “for fear of missing out.” Hashtags help remedy some of this, he says, but there needs to be another way to “elevate” the most relevant content for specific users.

“Rather than creating user lists of important follows, which may be too technical for many users, these tweets will instantly rise to the top of my feed when I log in based on my choosing,” Spano says.

Twitter’s role in customer service can’t be discounted either, says Spano. In the near future, “[w]e’ll see a lot of companies heaving up on their inbound community managers to handle the influx of demand from customers wanting real-time, instant satisfaction regarding issues,” he says, noting that “the days of calling in and waiting on hold are over.”

Of course, much of this is just speculation. But one thing remains certain: Twitter can’t just use an EdgeRank knock-off to build relevancy in its newsfeed. A different, more subtle approach is required. One that maintains the spirit of Twitter but moves the social network forward, too.

A tough balance, to be sure. It’ll be interesting to see what stays, what goes, and what’s on the horizon.


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Gillmor Gang: Summertime Blues

Saturday 30 August 2014 @ 9:02 am
Gillmor Gang Artcard The Gillmor Gang — Dan Farber, Robert Scoble, John Taschek, Kevin Marks, Keith Teare, and Steve Gillmor. This one seems more like an AA meeting for Apple addiction, as the Gang stumbles around pretending to be interested in Twitter tinkering with the Favorites model while just killing time until September 9. The reason we’re in reasonable humor is that we know we’re in for… Read More



11 TechCrunch Stories You Don’t Want To Miss This Week

Friday 29 August 2014 @ 3:10 pm
TC-weekly-roundup1 Before we take off for the long weekend, check out the best stories from the past week (8/23-8/29). After months of rumors suggesting that Google was prepped to snatch up Twitch, Amazon ended up dropping the money to make this deal happen. Alex Wilhelm originally reported the news for TechCrunch, but Kyle Russell offered some critical analysis about how Amazon’s acquisition is too big… Read More



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