Archive for the 'Twitter' Category



How Twitter can solve its onboarding problem

Thursday 25 September 2014 @ 1:30 pm

GUEST POST

How Twitter can solve its onboarding problem
Image Credit: Garrett Heath

I love Twitter — I get so much value from it. I never want it to go away and I actually have a bet with a friend that Twitter will be here in 20 years. Twitter was also the first network I added to my company.

But, Twitter has an onboarding problem.

This problem stems from the simple fact that it is not simple or easy for a new user to learn how to use Twitter to maximum benefit. It takes a lot of work to make Twitter work for you.

I believe Twitter’s growth numbers have slowed in recent years because it has failed at product education and making the sign-up process easy. Twitter is doing a great job monetizing, but it seems a little ridiculous that most people don’t know that if you start a tweet with an @ mention, that only the people who follow you and that handle will see it in their feed (here’s a quick fix).

Still, I think there is a solution to its onboarding problem.

One thought before jumping in. Most people I know learned to properly use Twitter from a friend or family member. I learned how to use it when I joined Aviary in 2010. @msg and @mayafish said I needed to get on active on Twitter and gave me a Twitter 101 sit down. I taught my wife (@liztaub) and my mom (@hindytaub). My mom taught my dad (@rubytaub) and on and on. I’ve heard this type of situation with many others and think Twitter might want to invest a little time and effort in local events. I think it will go a long way with the snowball effect of friends/family teaching friends/family.

Now onto the onboarding process.

First let’s diagnose the main problem. It’s hard for individuals to understand the value in Twitter. From the sign-up process to becoming an active user, they are not building the optimal follow list for their respective interests. This leads them to not use the product often. I think this is fair reasoning. So the solution needs to be:  how can Twitter get new users to a point where they are following enough of the right people to come back and use Twitter as their #1 source of information?

The current sign-up process requires someone to be a self-starter. It’s a major undertaking to find good people to follow. And most regular people are looking for shortcuts on a daily basis. They don’t want to take 30 minutes to follow a few hundred people to have a steady flow of news. They want things done for them and they want it to be good. This general life mentality is at odds with the way Twitter runs its sign-up flow and I think that is where the split of active users versus. non-active users happen. I don’t think Twitter releases total sign ups versus active users but I imagine there is a major discrepancy — more than your normal consumer-facing company. So, how does Twitter solve this pretty big problem?

I’ve thought about it a lot. I’m in a unique situation because I speak to a lot of Twitter users, mostly brands, but a sprinkle of individuals. This is something I do all day, given that I am the co-founder of SocialRank (a company that helps brands find out more about their followers on Twitter and pulls them into a central location , sort of like a Hootsuite but for followers).

Before founding SocialRank, I was running the business side of the API platform for payments company Dwolla with my now co-founder Michael, who led the technical side.

When we joined Dwolla we knew that the developer portal needed a huge facelift. At the time it was just a bunch of developer docs, which was great, but the problem was non-technical people couldn’t understand how they could leverage the API for their company. A common scenario we saw was that a CEO, head of product, business lead or someone else would come in trying to understand Dwolla and what they could do with the API, but were ultimately discouraged because there was no clear path for them. They didn’t understand the developer documentation, so we lost a potential merchant or partner.

dwolla

What we did was build an entry point (developers.dwolla.com) that had two paths, one for technical people and the other for non-technical folks. You either code or you don’t. If you do code, you go down the coding path and see the developer documentation, helper libraries and more. If you don’t code, you go down the path to see what the API’s capabilities are, how other merchants are using the API, and more. The flow worked out really well, API usage grew and a lot of developer sections copied it because of the success.

So how does this relate to Twitter’s sign-up process? I think there needs to be a path split at the most important point of Twitter’s sign-up process. But, instead of “Code” and “Don’t Code” it is “Build your follow list” and “Build it for me.” Let’s dig in as to how I think it should work.

twitterstep2

Twitter already does a really good job right after sign-up by asking you what your interests are. Once you finish ticking off your interests, though, is where I think they are missing a step. Here is where I would add the split path. One path to build your follow list as normal and one to have it built for you. If you click “Build your follow list,” you go through the existing way of onboarding — this is for those self-starters that naturally figure out how to use this crazy thing they call Twitter.

 builditforme

If you click “Build it for me!” that’s when things get interesting. There are a few ways to approach this, but let’s look at three.

1.

builditforme2

 

Once a person itemizes their interests in the previous step, Twitter can build an optimal follow list of 100–300 accounts that are awesome in these interests. So for example if you selected an interest in sports, tech, and rap and hip hop music you’d get a list of appropriate people to follow. Your sports list might include everyone from Bill Simmons and Kobe Bryant to a sports writer for the NY Times and A-Rod. For tech, you’d have everyone from Elon Musk, Tim Cook and Fred Wilson to Marc Andreessen, Drew Houston and Marissa Mayer; and for Music you’d have accounts like 50 Cent, Drake, Eminem, Iggy Azalea and Macklemore.

The list should include a combination of popular accounts (i.e. industry-celebrities) as well as people that have a highly engaged follower base. Twitter, you already have this data, so go and make awesome follower lists. Then a new user just has to learn how to perfect that follow list — adding new accounts and removing accounts, and learning what to tweet and how RTs, Favs and @ mentions work.

2.

 buildit3

On this next path, Twitter will ask a new user who they want to emulate after they list their interests. Instead of building an optimal follow list for them, suggest a few people that have the same interests as they do and offer them the opportunity to carbon copy someone else’s follow list.

This is a riskier approach, because follow lists are a combination of interests and personal contacts. So for example if someone had similar interests to me and decided to follow the people I follow in one fell swoop enabled by Twitter, they would get sports, media, tech but also get my friends, family and more. I don’t follow a lot of friends and family, maybe 20–50 accounts total, but enough to throw people off. It would be interesting if Twitter could do the carbon copy but remove the smaller friend and family accounts. In other words, take the top 75% in terms of follower count or engagement and start someone there.

3.

createfeed

The third path uses Twitter Lists. In this path Twitter would take very popular lists and use them as suggested follow lists — not to follow as a traditional list, but to follow the accounts within the list. This is another great starting point as Twitter will have a good sense of who likes what type of lists. Extracting those accounts out and building a follow list for a new user can be a good path to success.

Conclusion

I believe that if Twitter starts thinking about splitting new users into two types, the ones that want to select their followers for themselves and the ones that want to be told who to follow based on interests, Twitter will be able to A/B test and find optimal paths to activity as well as continue to tinker with the massive amounts of data they have and make the suggestions 100 times better.

Alex Taub is co-founder of Social Rank, an application that organizes and analyzes your Twitter followers. Find him at @ajt or [email protected]  


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Jack Dorsey’s Advertising Agency Couldn’t Make A More Pretentious Website If It Tried

Wednesday 24 September 2014 @ 3:02 pm
West advertusubg site Quid had a good run, but it looks like we have a new champion in the endless battle to have the most pretentious startup website. West, an advertising agency founded by former Apple exec Allison Johnson in 2011 with backing from Jack Dorsey and Ray Chambers, has managed to claim that spot with a site that offers absolutely no information about who works there or what kinds of services they offer. Read More



Twitter’s CEO does super-intense Crossfit workouts. How does your boss compare?

Sunday 21 September 2014 @ 9:45 am
Twitter’s CEO does super-intense Crossfit workouts. How does your boss compare?
Image Credit: Dick Costolo, Twitter

Twitter chief executive Dick Costolo got some extra special attention last week, after outspoken Paypal billionaire Peter Thiel mocked Twitter as a horribly mismanaged company because, “there’s probably a lot of pot-smoking going on there.”

Thiel’s swipe instantly went viral. The irony is that all the attention about Twitter’s lazy management brought attention to Costolo’s social media feed to see how the insulted CEO would respond. He did make one joke about working his way through a bag of Doritos. But then he went on an unusual tweet storm about his obsession with the fitness craze, Crossfit.

Crossfit is a rapidly expanding fitness brand that combines body weights, Olympic lifts, and cardio all in one short sprint. It’s become particularly popular among startups and tech companies looking to a build team culture around fitness. For anyone not familiar with the lingo, Costolo’s feed may have seemed like gibberish. Here’s the translation:

With a 100lb olympic barbell, I did three rounds of the Workout of the Day (WOD). The first round was 21 consecutive movements of a power clean, front squat, and overhead push press, or what is lovingly known as a “cluster” (video below). After that, another round of 15 reps, and then a third round of 9 reps.

If this wasn’t hard enough, after each round, the workout added another greweling move, Toes to Bar (T2B), before and after each of the 3 rounds. That’s hanging from a pull bar and touching your toes to the bar 6 times, 25 reps each (picture below).

maxresdefault (2)

Even for Crossfit, that’s a pretty tough workout.

To be sure, this wasn’t the upper limit of Costolo’s masochism. For Memorial day, Costolo subjected himself to Murph, one of Crossfit’s most grueling workouts. When I lived in LA, the Santa Monica SWAT team used Murph to weed out new recruits. Murph is:

  • 1-mile run
  • 100 pullups
  • 200 pushups
  • 300 air squats
  • 1-mile run

The upshot is that there aren’t a lot of smokers among those who can perform Murph and live to tweet about it (I can’t speak to paleo-friendly pot brownies, however).

Aside from the Thiel’s insult, it’s impressive to see the CEO of a public company also have such an intense workout routine. How does your company compare?


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It’s time for social to grow up

Friday 19 September 2014 @ 9:46 am

GUEST POST

It’s time for social to grow up
Image Credit: Pixabay

For all its apparent financial maturity, social media remains an utterly unique space within marketing, in which spontaneity and a genuine connection to an audience is valued above all else. That rare, natural quality exists because marketers hold an unparalleled amount of freedom within the medium.

But born from that room to operate increasingly comes misguided moments that negatively affect brands on a global scale. Unless the industry as a whole embraces creative as well as fiscal maturity, we’ll be shacked by process and legalese, killing everything that makes social so special.

When DiGiorno Pizza used the #WhyIStayed hashtag to sell pizzas, it inadvertently leveraged a serious conversation on domestic violence for financial gain. It was a mistake that was uniquely social, as was the immediate furor the brand faced globally.

The steps the brand took to remedy the mistake were immediate and refreshing: Instead of the standard boilerplate that has been run through legal thrice over, the individual responsible for the error was human and contrite in how willing they were to be laid bare to the public.

It was this very real moment, a response to a very real mistake that was fundamental in controlling and softening the brunt of those who voiced discontent.

However, DiGiorno is just the latest example of brands’ failure to think before they leap in social — the classic combination of FOMO and riding on the back of a Twitter trend, which unto itself is one of the last bastions of organic, viral social in an increasingly pay-to-play world. Both Delta and KLM didn’t think about the consequences of their tweets in an attempt to cash in on the World Cup. As a result, they were immediately called out, shamed, and forced to apologize to the expectant world stage.

A social media crisis plan was once penned to protect a brand from unexpected outside influences; now it is of our own making.

Real-time marketing is constantly in flux and difficult to gauge in the moment; it takes skill to do, and few can do it well. Brands that stumble when attempting to become part of that wider conversation take the risk of having the resultant negatives far outweigh any gains.

stop-think-social-mediaThese recent faux pas appear to be the new normal for brands participating in social media marketing — collateral damage for remaining at the cutting edge of the ever-changing conversation.

Instead, these gaffes should act as a wake-up call for the industry at large; one in which the value of the social media teams who are directly responsible for how a brand is perceived in the marketplace are finally weighted equally with traditional media — and staffed accordingly.

The community manager’s position on the social totem poll needs reevaluation, lest brands take the path of least resistance and embrace oversight and process to mitigate such very public blunders. The moment that happens, social media loses the social and transforms into yet another cog in the wheel of traditional marketing, wherein malaise and apathy are the rule.

By operating social at arm’s length through the community manager, a plausible deniability is attained, a fall guy assured, and a distance from the community it purports to serve achieved.

Relating to an audience and being seen as a real and natural voice means authentically reacting to and engaging with your audience and the world around you (and apologizing like DiGiorno if you need to). Establishing world-class teams that can gauge the zeitgeist as it is in flux and respond on-brand and appropriately means those apologies need never happen again.

That’s the hard part.


Andy White is Director of Social Business Strategy at Sprout Social, a leading social media management and engagement platform. Follow him @white.


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Twitpic avoids graveyard as mystery buyer steps in

Thursday 18 September 2014 @ 1:50 pm
Twitpic avoids graveyard as mystery buyer steps in

Above: TwitPic


Twitpic made a U-turn on its way to the graveyard.

In tweet posted today, Twitpic said that “we’re happy to announce we’ve been acquired and Twitpic will live on! We will post more details as we can disclose them.”

Twitpic basically died earlier this month after it announced that it was caving to the scary possibility of a bruising trademark court battle with the decidedly bigger Twitter. Twitpic enables users to infuse Tweets with photos.

Indeed, Twitter threatened to cut off Twitpic’s API, which would have decapitated the much smaller San Francsico-based company. In an email to VentureBeat, Twitpic founder and CEO Noah Everett wrote Sept. 25 would be his company’s last day.

“It started a few weeks ago. We hoped they would drop their case against our mark, but they made it clear they would not,” Everett said in an email to me then. “Sorry to not be able to give you anymore details than that, but honestly, that’s all there really is.”

Everett explained his reasons for caving to Twitter’s threats to head to court in a blog post:

“A few weeks ago Twitter contacted our legal demanding that we abandon our trademark application or risk losing access to their API. This came as a shock to us since Twitpic has been around since early 2008, and our trademark application has been in the USPTO since 2009.”

But now Twitpic lives. And, did Twitter buy them out? Waiting to hear back from Everett. Stay tuned.


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Twitter refines its targeted ads in a new update

Wednesday 17 September 2014 @ 10:05 am
Twitter refines its targeted ads in a new update
Image Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/25541021@N00/3819908425/

Twitter is catching up to Facebook’s mobile game.

The company today announced it’s updating its Tailored Audiences feature so that advertisers can create target lists based on mobile numbers and mobile IDs.

The added functionality will allow your favorite brands to take information they’ve amassed about you (in this case your email and phone number) and upload it to a list on Twitter or all the people it wants to send targeted ads to. Then Twitter will give that brand and the other companies vying for your attention an opportunity to bid for a spot in your Twitter stream.

AudienceManager_andListing_blog

“Its’ so hard to get organic reach now because there are so manny people fighting for attention and using all different kind of techniques. The best technique is using data to retarget,” says Dave Hendricks at LiveIntent, a company that develops software to place ads in digital newsletters (full disclosure: VentureBeat uses this platform for its newsletter).

It was once easy for brands to create Twitter and reach their consumers for free with tweets that would appear to their followers. But, as Hendricks said, there are a lot of people on Twitter hoping to grab your attention, so it’s not as easy as it once was to sell products on social media cache alone.

More and more companies are trying to refine targeting capabilities, not just based on the device a consumer is using, but based on specific information a brand has collected about a given consumer on customer relationship management systems. Big data is the way forward for advertising.

Facebook was really the first to endeavor into the mobile ad space with retargeted ads based on email and mobile information when it pushed into mobile a little more than two years ago. Twitter rolled out its Tailored Audience tool last December. This new feature will also includes “look-alike-only targeting,” which will allow advertisers to target consumers that are similar to the ones in their targeted lists.

Of course, Twitter will offer its users an opportunity to not be targeted through privacy settings. But, Hendricks thinks that ultimately there’s no turning back from retargeted advertising. “I believe that CRM retargeting will become more widespread, but I think you’ll see it on television and web display ads. Whether you’re logged into Amazon, or Playstation, I think you’ll see CRM retargeting on all of those channels.”



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Here’s what you can earn at the 20 top tech companies

Tuesday 16 September 2014 @ 11:30 pm
Here’s what you can earn at the 20 top tech companies
Image Credit: David Crow/Flickr

While there’s debate over whether there’s a shortage of qualified tech workers, there’s one thing no one argues about: Tech companies pay their employees well.

We’ve heard of senior engineers getting a base salary of $160,000, with stock options and other benefits on top. Some interns are earning $7,000 a month, which amounts to $84,000 a year.

So we sifted through job-hunting site Glassdoor to find the best-paying jobs listed on that site, at the best tech companies, according to Glassdoor’s ranking of the best places to work.

Business Insider logo

We listed the highest-paying job on Glassdoor, plus salaries for two common tech jobs: a senior technical role and a software engineer, at each company, to give you a sense of what those jobs pay as well.


No. 20: Salesforce.com, $319,000

Salesforce.com’s-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an executive vice president at $319,347.

A senior technical staffer gets, on average, $130,233.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $112,942.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 20)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Salesforce.com offers a cloud computing service that helps companies find and support customers.


No. 19: eBay, $320,679

eBay’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a vice president at $320,679.

A senior technical staffer gets paid, on average, $178,080.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $120,424.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 19)

Headquarters: San Jose, California

What it does: eBay is an ecommerce site best known for letting consumers sell stuff through online auctions.


No. 18: Texas Instruments, $156,530

Texas Instruments’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an applications engineering manager at $156,530.

A senior technical staff gets, on average, $125,778.

A software engineer gets, on average, $91,633.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 18)

Headquarters: Dallas, Texas

What it does: Texas Instruments is a semiconductor manufacturer.


No. 17: NetApp, $227,370

NetApp’s top-paying job on Glassdoor is for a director of marketing at $225,494.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $144,756.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $93,726.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 17)

Headquarters: Sunnyvale, California

What it does: NetApp offers enterprise computer-storage products.


No 16: Citrix, $176,322

Citrix’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $176,322.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $108,179.

A software engineer gets, on average, $88,728.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 16)

Headquarters: Fort Lauderdale, Florida

What it does: Citrix makes enterprise software that allows PCs and devices to remotely access corporate apps and data.


No 15: CareerBuilder.com, $131,000

CareerBuilder.com’s-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a director at $131,000.

A senior software engineer gets, on average, $84,650.

A software engineer gets, on average, $73,850.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 15)

Headquarters: Chicago, Illinois

What it does: CareerBuilder.com is a website for job seekers and recruiters.


No. 14: Apple, $255,700

Apple’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $255,700.

A software development manager gets, on average, $180,333.

A software engineer gets, on average, $110,867.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 14)

Headquarters: Cupertino, California

What it does: Apple makes the Macintosh PC, iPad tablet, iPhone smartphone, and other consumer tech devices and software.


No. 13: Intel, $231,084

Intel’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software engineering director at $231,084.

A principal engineer gets, on average, $170,146.

A software engineer gets, on average, $97,403.

Employee rating: 3.8 out of 5 (Rank 13)

Headquarters: Santa Clara, California

What it does: Intel is a semiconductor manufacturer best known for processors that power PCs and servers.


No. 12: Rackspace, $136,229

Rackspace’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software developer V at $136,229.

A manager of software development gets, on average, $125,528.

A software engineer III gets, on average, $82,000.

Employee rating: 3.9 out of 5 (Rank 12)

Headquarters: San Antonio, Texas

What it does: Rackspace offers cloud computing and web-hosting services to enterprises.


No. 11: National Instruments, $122,486

National Instruments’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a Principal Engineer at $122,486.

A senior group manager gets, on average, $112,500.

A software engineer gets, on average, $64,129.

Employee rating: 3.9 out of 5 (Rank 11)

Headquarters: Austin, Texas

What it does: National Instruments makes test equipment for building tech products.


No. 10: Red Hat, $192,333

Red Hat’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $192,333.

A principal software engineer gets, on average, $124,277.

A software engineer gets, on average, $79,725.

Employee rating: 4 out of 5 (Rank 10)

Headquarters: Raleigh, North Carolina

What it does: Red Hat offers open-source software for enterprises, including a popular version of Linux.


No. 9: MathWorks, $137,313

MathWorks’ top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a principal software engineer at $137,313.

A senior design engineer gets, on average, $117,947.

A software engineer gets, on average, $81,060.

Employee rating: 4 out of 5 (Rank 9)

Headquarters: Natick, Massachusetts

What it does: MathWorks makes computational software for engineers and scientists.


No. 8: Intuit, $216,714

Intuit’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a director of product management at $216,714.

A software engineering director gets, on average, $195,636.

A staff software engineer gets, on average, $137,424.

Employee rating: 4.1 out of 5 (Rank 8)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: Intuit makes financial and tax-preparation software for consumers and small businesses.


No. 7: Riverbed, $186,667

Riverbed’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director at $186,667.

An engineering manager gets, on average, $145,309.

A software engineer gets, on average, $109,464.

Employee rating: 4.1 out of 5 (Rank 7)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Riverbed makes hardware and software that helps enterprise networks run faster.


No. 6: Qualcomm, $222,647

Qualcomm’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a senior director of hardware engineering at $222,647.

A principal systems engineer gets, on average, $183,153.

A software engineer gets, on average, $88,312.

Employee rating: 4.2 out of 5 (Rank 6)

Headquarters: San Diego, California

What it does: Qualcomm is a semiconductor manufacturer best known for its Snapdragon processors that power smartphones and other mobile devices.


No. 5: Google, $281,930

Google’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a marketing director at $281,930.

An engineering director gets, on average, $256,250.

A software engineer gets, on average, $118,968.

Employee rating: 4.3 out of 5 (Rank 5)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: Google operates the world’s largest internet search engine and makes the Android operating system. It makes most of its money from advertising.


No 4: Guidewire, $157,918

Guidewire’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a development manager at $157,918.

A senior solutions architect gets, on average, $136,493.

A software engineer gets, on average, $108,918.

Employee rating: 4.5 out of 5 (Rank 4)

Headquarters: Foster City, California

What it does: Guidewire offers software for the property- and life-insurance industries.


No. 3: Facebook, $191,591

Facebook’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a software engineering manager at $191,591.

An IT Manager gets, on average, $163,197.

A software engineer gets, on average, $118,445.

Employee rating: 4.5 out of 5 (Rank 3)

Headquarters: Menlo Park, California

What it does: Facebook is a social network where people can share their thoughts and photos with friends. It makes most of its money through advertising.


No. 2: LinkedIn, $205,980

LinkedIn’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for an engineering manager at $205,980.

A senior business systems analyst/business analytics gets, on average, $171,745.

A software engineer gets, on average, $127,557.

Employee rating: 4.6 out of 5 (Rank 2)

Headquarters: Mountain View, California

What it does: LinkedIn is a social network for professionals. It sells premium subscriptions and job-recruiting services.


No. 1: Twitter, $179,416

Twitter’s top-paying job listed on Glassdoor is for a staff engineer at $179,416.

An engineering manager gets, on average, $166,520.

A software engineer gets, on average, $121,642.

Employee rating: 4.6 out of 5 (Rank 1)

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

What it does: Twitter offers a social-media service where people can share their thoughts with the word in 140 characters or less. It generates revenue through advertising.

This story originally appeared on www.businessinsider.com.


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Mobile video ad spend will reach $1.5B by the end of the year (report)

Monday 8 September 2014 @ 5:00 pm
Mobile video ad spend will reach $1.5B by the end of the year (report)
Image Credit: Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock

Mobile video ads could be the final frontier in the nascent mobile advertising space.

U.S. ad firms and marketers will spend about $1.5 billion on mobile video adds by the end of 2014, up from the $722 million spent last year. Mobile video ads accounted for nearly 19 percent of all digital video ad spending last year, a number that will climb to nearly 26 percent by the end of this year, according to eMarketer principal analyst David Hallerman.

“And by the year 2018, the number will quadruple to over $6 billion. This is huge growth,” Hallerman said.

“And let’s look at the big picture,” he added. “Mobile video ads are important.”

emarketer mobile video ad

Incredibly, there are no clear leaders in the space, unlike straight mobile ads, which Google dominates. Facebook is No. 2 in the space, followed by Twitter. The latter two companies posted astronomical growth in the mobile ad space in their second quarter results.

Still, mobile video ads accounted for just 1 percent of all the U.S. ad spend last year, Hallerman said. That total ad spend also includes the old bricks-and-mortar world of print (remember that?), radio, and outdoor advertising.

So why aren’t more advertisers embracing the mobile video ad spectrum?

“The thing that holds mobile video ads back is the frustration of watching video on slow 3G networks,” Hallerman said. “Changes need to made by the Verizons and AT&Ts of the world in order to deal with this.”

To be sure, the mobile ad sector itself is enormous and growing at an astonishing rate. Around 500 players live in the ecosystem, including mobile marketers, ad brokers, exchanges, data-analytics and gaming firms, and others. But not so for the mobile video space.

Analysts said the mobile ad ecosystem was worth more than $17 billion last year. By the end of the 2014, that number is expected to crest to $35 billion. But the mobile video ad space is different, and wide open, which is what makes the space so attractive to those wishing to become serious players.

“There is no one company that rules. Therefore, because it’s not being dominated, it’s very attractive for vendors and ad sellers. There’s no clutter in the space and nobody keeping anybody from the playing field,” Hallerman said.

But without question, Google, Facebook, and Twitter must be listening. And watching. But are they really?


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Google's innovative search technologies connect millions of people around the world with information every day. Founded in 1998 by Stanford Ph.D. students Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Google today is a top web property in all major glob... read more »











Twitpic calls it quits rather than battling Twitter in court

Thursday 4 September 2014 @ 5:16 pm

The image hosting site Twitpic is dead. Why? Because of its name.

The company found itself in a trademark dispute with Twitter, which caused the much smaller Twitpic to throw in the towel.

Twitter threatened to cut off Twitpic’s API, which was the service’s sole source of content.

Twitpic founder Noah Everett this way in a blog post:

“A few weeks ago Twitter contacted our legal demanding that we abandon our trademark application or risk losing access to their API. This came as a shock to us since Twitpic has been around since early 2008, and our trademark application has been in the USPTO since 2009.”

“[It] started a few weeks ago, we hoped they would drop their case against our mark, but they made it clear they would not,” Everett said in an email to VentureBeat Thursday.
“Sorry to not be able to give you anymore details than that, but honestly that’s all there really is,” Everett wrote.
Everett said rather than fight a Twitter, which has a market cap of $30 billion and is riding high on strong second quarter earnings, the decision was made to back down. Obviously, Twitter has the money to bleed Twitpic dry in a legal battle over the trademark.

A spokeswoman for Twitter did not return emails for comment.

Over the last three years, Twitter has moved to build-out its suite of photo features and uploading tools, which cut deeply into Twitpic’s bottom line. Still, Everett was more than bummed to see the demise of his Internet economy dream. Everett’s blog post continued:

“On a personal note I (@noaheverett) want to thank you for letting us be a part of your life and helping you share your experiences over the past 6 years, it’s truly been an honor. I have learned so much through running Twitpic over the years. Through the many mistakes I’ve made and lessons learned, to the bad days and the great days. Thank you again everyone…I will miss and cherish the days of Twitpic we had together.”

Twitpic’s last day of operations is September 25. Users will be able, in the meantime, to download all their photos and videos off the site, according to Everett.


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Twitter is a real-time information network that connects you to the latest information about what you find interesting. Simply find the public streams you find most compelling and follow the conversations. At the heart of Twitter ar... read more »











Twitter Taps HackerOne To Launch Its Bug Bounty Program

Wednesday 3 September 2014 @ 9:47 am
Star-Wars-Boba-Fett-Artwork-Wallpaper Following security breaches that have shook confidence in many online services, Twitter today announced the launch of its bug bounty program that will pay security researchers for responsibly reporting threats through HackerOne, a bug bounty program provider. Twitter will pay a minimum of $140 per threat reported on Twitter.com, ads.twitter, mobile Twitter, TweetDeck, apps.twitter, and its… Read More



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