Misfit Debuts The Shine 2, A Bigger, More Powerful Version Of Its Flagship Activity & Sleep Tracker

Product Over two years ago, Misfit launched an activity monitor called “Shine,” which was among the first breakout successes in the wearable space, offering an attractive alternative to competitors’ then more plastic-looking fitness trackers. In the years since, the company has expanded its product line to include a range of connected devices, including also sleep monitors and… Read More

Misfit unveils the Shine 2 fitness and sleep monitoring wearable

Product

The health wearables company Misfit today announced the second version of its popular Shine fitness and sleep tracker — the Shine 2.

Misfit says it’s completely redesigned the Shine, adding a new 3-axis magnetometer to the 3-axis accelerometer inside the device. The accelerometer measures movement, while magnetometers typically measure the strength and pull direction of an external magnetic field.

Like its predecessor, the Shine 2 tracks steps, calories, and distance, and can automatically track light sleep and deep sleep. It also can tell the difference between different types of exercise, including swimming, basketball, tennis, soccer, yoga, and dance.

Like the Apple Watch, the Shine 2’s vibration motor gives the wearer inactivity alerts to keep them moving.

The wearer can see their exercise status and other information through a circle of 12 colored LED lights on the front of the device. Misfit says the lights can show combinations of more than 16 million possible colors.

The touch responsiveness, syncing, and Bluetooth range have also each been improved in the new device.

The Shine 2, like the original Shine, runs on a single, replaceable watch battery, which lasts about six months.

The $100 Shine 2 comes in rose gold and carbon black, an can be ordered now at the Misfit website. It’ll be available in retail locations worldwide in November, the company says.










Misfit unveils the Shine 2 fitness and sleep monitoring wearable

Product

The health wearables company Misfit today announced the second version of its popular Shine fitness and sleep tracker — the Shine 2.

Misfit says it’s completely redesigned the Shine, adding a new 3-axis magnetometer to the 3-axis accelerometer inside the device. The accelerometer measures movement, while magnetometers typically measure the strength and pull direction of an external magnetic field.

Like its predecessor, the Shine 2 tracks steps, calories, and distance, and can automatically track light sleep and deep sleep. It also can tell the difference between different types of exercise, including swimming, basketball, tennis, soccer, yoga, and dance.

Like the Apple Watch, the Shine 2’s vibration motor gives the wearer inactivity alerts to keep them moving.

The wearer can see their exercise status and other information through a circle of 12 colored LED lights on the front of the device. Misfit says the lights can show combinations of more than 16 million possible colors.

The touch responsiveness, syncing, and Bluetooth range have also each been improved in the new device.

The Shine 2, like the original Shine, runs on a single, replaceable watch battery, which lasts about six months.

The $100 Shine 2 comes in rose gold and carbon black, an can be ordered now at the Misfit website. It’ll be available in retail locations worldwide in November, the company says.










The Cloud-Connected Car Drives IoT Monetization

wificar The car is well on its way to becoming the most sophisticated mobile device in the Internet of Things (IoT), or, to use a phrase that’s more to the point, the Monetization of Things™ (MoT). Linked to the cloud by way of wireless technologies, smart chips, onboard computers and mobile apps, connected vehicles are driving new business models and disrupting old ones. Here’s a look… Read More

You can now mute tabs in Chrome

google_chrome_logo

Chrome for Windows, Mac, and Linux now finally lets you mute any single tab. Just right click a tab that is producing sound and hit “Mute tab.” You no longer have to decide between opening the tab to figure out what’s playing and just closing the tab outright.

The new feature was added in Chrome 46, as first spotted by The Verge. This is the same Chrome release that removed the “OK Google” hotword to trigger voice search.

The ability to mute individual tabs has been available as browser add-ons and extensions for a while, but users want it built into the browser. Back in February 2013, we first heard audio indicators were coming to Chrome, and indeed, the feature arrived in January 2014 with the launch of Chrome 32. Now Google is finally taking the feature to the next level.

chrome_mute_right_click

Mozilla is also adding similar functionality to its browser, which still doesn’t have any sort of tab audio indicators. Firefox 42 beta adds not only a speaker icon if a tab is producing sound, but a single click mutes (speaker icon gets crossed out) or unmutes the given tab.

While Chrome has had audio indicators for more than a year now, it didn’t let you easily mute tabs by default, until now. An option in chrome://flags/ was available, but it wasn’t on by default. In fact, it’s still there (the #enable-tab-audio-muting flag), and it makes it possible to mute a tab with just a single click, if you prefer that method.

For whatever reason, Google has gone with the implementation that requires two clicks out-of-the-box. Either way, both solutions let you mute a tab without having to switch to it first, which is really what matters here when you’re scrambling to silence that annoying tab which decided to start playing for no apparent reason.

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Yahoo’s stab at original programming didn’t work

Yahoo-Screen-iPhone-Grid-View

Yahoo won’t be competing with Netflix anytime soon.

During its fourth quarter earnings call, Yahoo CFO Ken Goldman noted that the company wrote-off $42 million in expenses related to the sixth season of Community, as well as its two original programs Sin City Saints and Other Space. 

Goldman said that Yahoo had difficulty effectively monetizing the programming, “In three cases at least, it didn’t work the way that we hoped it would.”

Creating original content is a costly endeavor. Plus, with well established players like HBO, Netflix, and Showtime offering competitive pricing packages, it’s hard to convince users to pay for alternative content. That’s likely why Amazon gives its content away for free to Prime subscribers.

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has said that the company plans on focusing on fewer, more quality products going forward. For its video content platform Yahoo Screen that may mean focusing on more live events coverage, like its streaming deals with the NFL and Live Nation.










Apple tells judge it’s ‘impossible’ to access data on locked iPhones

iPhone 6

Apple told a U.S. judge that accessing data stored on a locked iPhone would be “impossible” with devices using its latest operating system, but the company has the “technical ability” to help law enforcement unlock older phones.

Apple’s position was laid out in a brief filed late Monday, after a federal magistrate judge in Brooklyn, New York, sought its input as he weighed a U.S. Justice Department request to force the company to help authorities access a seized iPhone.

In court papers, Apple said that for the 90 percent of its devices running iOS 8 or higher, granting the Justice Department’s request “would be impossible to perform” after it strengthened encryption methods.

Those devices include a feature that prevents anyone without the device’s passcode from accessing its data, including Apple itself.

The feature was adopted in 2014 amid heightened privacy concerns following leaks by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden about NSA surveillance programs.

Apple told U.S. Magistrate Judge James Orenstein it could access the 10 percent of its devices that continue to use older systems, including the one at issue in the case. But it urged the judge to not require it to comply with the Justice Department’s request.

“Forcing Apple to extract data in this case, absent clear legal authority to do so, could threaten the trust between Apple and its customers and substantially tarnish the Apple brand,” Apple’s lawyers wrote.

A spokeswoman for Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Robert Caspers, whose office is handling the case, declined comment.

Earlier this month, Orenstein expressed skepticism about whether he could require Apple to disable security on the iPhone, citing Congress’ failure to act on the issue of encryption despite the urging of the Justice Department and Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Orenstein deferred ruling until Apple could had a chance to say if it was technically feasible and, if so, whether compliance with the proposed order would be unduly burdensome.” A hearing is expected on Friday.

The case is In re Order requiring Apple, Inc to assist in the execution of a search warrant issued by the court, U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York, No. 15-mc-01902.

(Reporting by Nate Raymond in New York; Editing by Marguerita Choy)










Apple tells judge it’s ‘impossible’ to access data on locked iPhones

iPhone 6

Apple told a U.S. judge that accessing data stored on a locked iPhone would be “impossible” with devices using its latest operating system, but the company has the “technical ability” to help law enforcement unlock older phones.

Apple’s position was laid out in a brief filed late Monday, after a federal magistrate judge in Brooklyn, New York, sought its input as he weighed a U.S. Justice Department request to force the company to help authorities access a seized iPhone.

In court papers, Apple said that for the 90 percent of its devices running iOS 8 or higher, granting the Justice Department’s request “would be impossible to perform” after it strengthened encryption methods.

Those devices include a feature that prevents anyone without the device’s passcode from accessing its data, including Apple itself.

The feature was adopted in 2014 amid heightened privacy concerns following leaks by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden about NSA surveillance programs.

Apple told U.S. Magistrate Judge James Orenstein it could access the 10 percent of its devices that continue to use older systems, including the one at issue in the case. But it urged the judge to not require it to comply with the Justice Department’s request.

“Forcing Apple to extract data in this case, absent clear legal authority to do so, could threaten the trust between Apple and its customers and substantially tarnish the Apple brand,” Apple’s lawyers wrote.

A spokeswoman for Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Robert Caspers, whose office is handling the case, declined comment.

Earlier this month, Orenstein expressed skepticism about whether he could require Apple to disable security on the iPhone, citing Congress’ failure to act on the issue of encryption despite the urging of the Justice Department and Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Orenstein deferred ruling until Apple could had a chance to say if it was technically feasible and, if so, whether compliance with the proposed order would be unduly burdensome.” A hearing is expected on Friday.

The case is In re Order requiring Apple, Inc to assist in the execution of a search warrant issued by the court, U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York, No. 15-mc-01902.

(Reporting by Nate Raymond in New York; Editing by Marguerita Choy)