Europe Finally Agrees Tough New Data Protection Rules

aerial of Europe with lights Late yesterday European institutions finally agreed the text of new data protection rules (GDPR), more than three years after new regulation was proposed. The 28 Member States of the European Union will have two years to transpose the provisions of the GDPR into their national laws, with the regulation set to come into force from 2018. Read More

Europe Finally Agrees Tough New Data Protection Rules

aerial of Europe with lights Late yesterday European institutions finally agreed the text of new data protection rules (GDPR), more than three years after new regulation was proposed. The 28 Member States of the European Union will have two years to transpose the provisions of the GDPR into their national laws, with the regulation set to come into force from 2018. Read More

Google’s top tech searches in 2015: iPhone 6s, Samsung Galaxy S6, and Apple Watch

google_logo

Just like every other company on the planet, Google puts together end-of-year lists for its various properties. But there’s only one that matters more than all the rest: Search.

Google today released the 15th installment of its year-end zeitgeist. There are a myriad of categories, and you can really dive in to see very specific searches to satisfy that curiosity. But we’re not interested in “Oscar Red Carpet Dresses,” “Calorie Searches,” nor ” Celebrity Pregnancies” (yes, that’s sadly a category this year once again).

First and foremost, let’s start with the winners overall. Here are the top 10 global trending searches for 2015:

  1. Lamar Odom
  2. Charlie Hebdo
  3. Agar.io
  4. Jurassic World
  5. Paris
  6. Furious 7
  7. Fallout 4
  8. Ronda Rousey
  9. Caitlyn Jenner
  10. American Sniper

For reference, the top three trending searches last year were for Robin Williams, World Cup, and Ebola.

The category we really want to see is of course technology. So we asked Google to pull from the global list and here are the top 10 consumer tech searches for 2015:

  1. iPhone 6s
  2. Samsung Galaxy S6
  3. Apple Watch
  4. iPad Pro
  5. LG G4
  6. Samsung Galaxy Note 5
  7. Samsung Galaxy J5
  8. HTC One M9
  9. Nexus 6P
  10. Surface Pro 4

Put another way, that’s three Apple, three Samsung, one LG, one HTC, one Google, and one Microsoft. And again for reference, the top three consumer tech searches last year were for iPhone 6, Samsung Galaxy S5, and Nexus 6.

Below are five more categories for top searches globally in 2015.

People:

  1. Lamar Odom
  2. Ronda Rousey
  3. Caitlyn Jenner
  4. Adele
  5. Charlie Sheen
  6. Ruby Rose
  7. Donald Trump
  8. Sia
  9. Dakota Johnson
  10. Jeremy Clarkson

Movies:

  1. Jurassic World
  2. Furious 7
  3. American Sniper
  4. Fifty Shade of Grey
  5. Minions
  6. Spectre
  7. Straight Outta Compton
  8. Mad Max
  9. Prem Ratan Dhan Payo
  10. Birdman

TV:

  1. Big Brother Brazil
  2. Jessica Jones
  3. Bigg Boss
  4. Fear the Walking Dead
  5. Better Call Saul
  6. Game of Thrones
  7. Daredevil
  8. One Punch Man
  9. Verdades Secretas
  10. Scream Queens

News:

  1. Charlie Hebdo
  2. Paris
  3. Hurricane Patricia
  4. Isis
  5. Nepal
  6. El Chapo
  7. Greece
  8. Baltimore Riots
  9. San Bernardino
  10. Hurricane Joaquin

Loss:

  1. Bobbi Kristina
  2. Cristiano Araujo
  3. Christopher Lee
  4. Sandra Bland
  5. Stuart Scott
  6. Leonard Nimoy
  7. Zhanna Friske
  8. Naomi Kawashima
  9. Scott Weiland
  10. BB King

As always, Google’s Year in Search site will give you a closer look at the stories that defined 2015. Like last year, Google makes the trending topics of the year directly accessible from Google Search: just type in “google 2015” without the quotes to see the top trending lists from around the world.

For a complete look at the top searches, including breakdowns on a per-country basis, head to google.com/2015.










Amazon rolls out its new burstable t2.nano instances

The Amazon Web Services booth at the AWS Public Sector Symposium 2015 conference.

Back in October, Amazon’s chief technology officer Werner Vogels announced at the AWS re:Invent conference that its new t2.nano instances would be available later this year. On Tuesday, the company delivered on that promise.

“Like their larger siblings (t2.micro, t2.small, t2.medium, and t2.large), these instances provide a baseline level of processing power, along with the ability to save up unused cycles and use them when the need arises,” Amazon’s chief evangelist for AWS, Jeff Barr, wrote in a blog posting.

At the time of AWS re:Invent, Vogels also announced new high-performing x1 instances that would arrive in the first half of 2016.

The t2.nano instances are available from today in the U.S. East (Northern Virginia), U.S. West (Oregon), U.S. West (Northern California), Europe (Ireland), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), South America (Brazil), and AWS GovCloud (U.S.) regions. Beyond those markets, they’ll be “available soon” in Europe (Frankfurt) and Asia Pacific (Sydney).

“I expect to see the t2.nano used to host low-traffic websites, run microservices, support dev / test environments, and to be used as cost-effective monitoring vehicles,” Barr said. “There are also plenty of ways to use these instances in training and educational settings.”

Full details of pricing, specs, and sample configurations can be found here.

More information:

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Amazon rolls out its new burstable t2.nano instances

The Amazon Web Services booth at the AWS Public Sector Symposium 2015 conference.

Back in October, Amazon’s chief technology officer Werner Vogels announced at the AWS re:Invent conference that its new t2.nano instances would be available later this year. On Tuesday, the company delivered on that promise.

“Like their larger siblings (t2.micro, t2.small, t2.medium, and t2.large), these instances provide a baseline level of processing power, along with the ability to save up unused cycles and use them when the need arises,” Amazon’s chief evangelist for AWS, Jeff Barr, wrote in a blog posting.

At the time of AWS re:Invent, Vogels also announced new high-performing x1 instances that would arrive in the first half of 2016.

The t2.nano instances are available from today in the U.S. East (Northern Virginia), U.S. West (Oregon), U.S. West (Northern California), Europe (Ireland), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), South America (Brazil), and AWS GovCloud (U.S.) regions. Beyond those markets, they’ll be “available soon” in Europe (Frankfurt) and Asia Pacific (Sydney).

“I expect to see the t2.nano used to host low-traffic websites, run microservices, support dev / test environments, and to be used as cost-effective monitoring vehicles,” Barr said. “There are also plenty of ways to use these instances in training and educational settings.”

Full details of pricing, specs, and sample configurations can be found here.

More information:

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Startup Failures of 2015

Techinasia has rounded up a list of 11 startups that gave up in 2015. The list includes From Foodtech: Dazo Investors: Rajan Anandan of Google, Amit Agarwal of Amazon, Kunal Shah of FreeCharge and Founders of CommonFloor, TaxiForSure, and Yo China. Spoonjoy Investors: SAIF Partners; Sachin Bansal of Flipkart From E-Commerce: DoneByNone Investors: Seedfund From HR Tech: TalentPad

Akamai: Global average Internet speed grew 14% to 5.1 Mbps, only 5.2% of users have broadband

broadband_speed_lights

Global average connection speeds rose 14 percent year over year to 5.1 Mbps in Q3 2015. Unfortunately, just over 5 percent of users now have broadband speeds of at least 25.0 Mbps. The latest figures come from Akamai, which today published its quarterly State of the Internet Report for Q3 2015.

The firm found 126 countries experienced an increase in average connection speeds year over year, ranging from 0.2 percent in Japan to a 147 percent rise in Congo (the only country to see average connection speeds more than double from the previous year). 19 countries saw their average connection speeds decrease year over year, with losses ranging from 0.6 percent (to 1.8 Mbps) in Namibia to 64 percent (to 1.3 Mbps) in Sudan.

As you can see below, seven of the top 10 countries/regions saw growth year over year, and seven also saw growth quarter over quarter:

average_connection_speed_akamai_q3_2015

In January, the United States’ FCC redefined its broadband threshold from 4 Mbps downstream to 25 Mbps. Akamai thus started referring to certain thresholds by speed rather than specific terms.

Global adoption of speeds 4 Mbps and greater (the old U.S. definition of broadband) increased 9.8 percent year over year to hit 65 percent penetration. Adoption of speeds 10 Mbps and up grew 19 percent year over year to hit 27 percent penetration, while adoption of 15 Mbps and up grew 21 percent year over year to hit 15 percent penetration.

broadband_speed_akamai_q3_2015

Most importantly, global adoption of speeds 25 Mbps and greater (the current U.S. definition for “broadband”) increased 15 percent year over year to hit 5.2 percent penetration. All of the top 10 countries now have a penetration rate in double digits, but only South Korea can say one in five of its citizens have broadband speeds.

As in previous reports, Akamai also cited mobile traffic data collected by Ericsson, which has a presence in more than 180 countries and a customer base representing more than 1,000 networks. The volume of mobile data traffic grew 14 percent quarter over quarter and 65 percent year over year:

voice_data_akamai_ericsson_q3_2015

Mobile voice traffic continues to show a flat progression, while mobile data is still growing steadily. The latter is naturally driven by more and more mobile devices as well as a growth in average data volume, largely thanks to mobile users watching more videos

You can check out the full 60-page report for yourself here: